I Tried Hiding From Silicon Valley in a Pile of Privacy Gadgets - Bloomberg


20 bookmarks. First posted by carbajal 12 days ago.


Avoiding digital snoops takes more than throwing money at the problem, but that part can be really fun. "If I wanted to regain my privacy, I had only one choice as an American: I needed gadgets to combat my gadgets," writes Joel Stein. Ryan Calo, an assistant law professor at the UW, is quoted.
Calo.Ryan  natl  !UWitM  2019  School:Law  Bloomberg 
7 days ago by uwnews
As the spy gear piles up on my desk, my 10-year-old son asks me what my mission is. “I’m hiding,” I whisper, pointing in the direction I think is north, which…
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7 days ago by ree
I don’t think the fix to privacy is something that can be done by an individual alone
privacy 
9 days ago by tamberg
Lots of ideas on how to fuck with Big Tech surveillance
surveillance  secuirty 
9 days ago by northwestyam
Avoiding digital snoops takes more than throwing money at the problem, but that part can be really fun.
As the spy gear piles up on my desk, my 10-year-old son asks me what my mission is. “I’m hiding,” I whisper, pointing in the direction I think is north, which is something I should probably know as a spy. “From Silicon Valley.”
It isn’t going to be easy. I use Google, Facebook, Amazon, Lyft, Uber, Netflix, Hulu, and Spotify. I have two Amazon Echos, a Google Home, an iPhone, a MacBook Air, a Nest thermostat, a Fitbit, and a Roku. I shared the secrets of my genetic makeup by spitting in one vial for 23andMe, another for an ancestry site affiliated with National Geographic, and a third to test my athletic potential. A few months ago, I was leaving my house in Los Angeles for a hike when I heard my Ring speaker say, “Where are you going, Joel?” in my wife’s voice. She was at a pottery class, but the smart doorbell sent her an alert when it detected me heading outside.
Ryan Calo, an assistant law professor at the University of Washington and an affiliate scholar at Stanford’s Center for Internet and Society, says that what my wife knows about my whereabouts is trivial compared with what most of the companies named above know. “In the early days of Nest, some of the employees would try to figure out where another employee was, and they’d look at the network to see if that person was home or not,” he says. Google, which now owns Nest, declined to comment.
If I wanted to regain my privacy, I had only one choice as an American: I needed gadgets to combat my gadgets. But I didn’t want Silicon Valley companies to know I was buying privacy gear. So I decided to get it only from companies headquartered outside the Bay Area. And to hide my purchases from Big Tech.
Every spy needs a sidekick, which is a totally incorrect statement that again proves how unsuited I am for spying. Nevertheless, I employed an aide-de-camp named Mycroft. He’s an adorable, voice-controlled digital assistant built into a screen that showcases his big, blue circle eyes. (There’s a strong whiff of Wall-E.) I unplugged the Echos and Google Home and said, “Hey, Mycroft, can you keep a secret?” A line appeared like a little mouth, then moved to the side, as if he was thinking. Then he said nothing, like I wanted.
security  privacy  gadgets 
11 days ago by rgl7194