The Birth of the New American Aristocracy - The Atlantic


170 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 may 2018.


Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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4 weeks ago by keithb
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem. For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. via Pocket
economics  politics 
8 weeks ago by sohailmamdani
The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy
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8 weeks ago by jubois
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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10 weeks ago by aditir
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem. For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
11 weeks ago by kubia
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem.
society  politics 
11 weeks ago by brsma
The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2KvteTd
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12 weeks ago by craniac
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem. For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. via Pocket
250_SocialClass 
july 2018 by glewmarg
The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy via
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july 2018 by mattlatmatt
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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july 2018 by dylan
I’ve joined a new aristocracy now, even if we still call ourselves meritocratic winners. To be sure, there is a lot to admire about my new group, which I’ll call—for reasons you’ll soon see—the 9.9 percent. We’ve dropped the old dress codes, put our faith in facts, and are (somewhat) more varied in skin tone and ethnicity. People like me, who have waning memories of life in an earlier ruling caste, are the exception, not the rule.

By any sociological or financial measure, it’s good to be us. It’s even better to be our kids. In our health, family life, friendship networks, and level of education, not to mention money, we are crushing the competition below. But we do have a blind spot, and it is located right in the center of the mirror: We seem to be the last to notice just how rapidly we’ve morphed, or what we’ve morphed into.

The meritocratic class has mastered the old trick of consolidating wealth and passing privilege along at the expense of other people’s children. We are not innocent bystanders to the growing concentration of wealth in our time. We are the principal accomplices in a process that is slowly strangling the economy, destabilizing American politics, and eroding democracy. Our delusions of merit now prevent us from recognizing the nature of the problem that our emergence as a class represents. We tend to think that the victims of our success are just the people excluded from the club. But history shows quite clearly that, in the kind of game we’re playing, everybody loses badly in the end.
Culture:Class  Culture:Race  reference 
july 2018 by rosadina
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem.
economics  politics 
july 2018 by dannydb
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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july 2018 by nertzy
the 9.9% and inherited privilege - how societies structure into and maintain hierarchy
economics  trump  inequality  money  elite  privilege  aristocracy  history 
june 2018 by emmacarlson
Obesity, diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, and liver disease are all two to three times more common in individuals who have a family income of less than $35,000 than in those who have a family income greater than $100,000. Among low-educated, middle-aged whites, the death rate in the United States—alone in the developed world—increased in the first decade and a half of the 21st century.
Inequality  mobility  USA  world  AtlanticMonthly 
june 2018 by HispanicPundit
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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june 2018 by AramZS
el in our bones that class works only for itself; that every individual is dispensable; that some of us will be discarded and replaced with fresh blood. This insecurity of privilege only grows as the chasm beneath the privileged class expands. It is the restless engine that drives us to invest still more time and energy in the walls that will keep us safe by keeping others out.
2018  america  economics  politics 
june 2018 by avikbhattacharya
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem. For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies.
Archive  economics 
june 2018 by dvand5
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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june 2018 by poritsky
In between the top 0.1 percent and the bottom 90 percent is a group that has been doing just fine. It has held on to its share of a growing pie decade after decade.
june 2018 by brc007
👍 if you've not already seen it, this is a fantastic read that touches on many similar themes
from twitter
june 2018 by jburnmurdoch
This was good throughout, but I found these things especially insightful:

"Imagine yourself on the socioeconomic ladder with one end of a rubber band around your ankle and the other around your parents’ rung. The strength of the rubber determines how hard it is for you to escape the rung on which you were born. If your parents are high on the ladder, the band will pull you up should you fall; if they are low, it will drag you down when you start to rise. Economists represent this concept with a number they call “intergenerational earnings elasticity,” or IGE, which measures how much of a child’s deviation from average income can be accounted for by the parents’ income. An IGE of zero means that there’s no relationship at all between parents’ income and that of their offspring. An IGE of one says that the destiny of a child is to end up right where she came into the world."

And this:

"The source of the trouble, considered more deeply, is that we have traded rights for privileges. We’re willing to strip everyone, including ourselves, of the universal right to a good education, adequate health care, adequate representation in the workplace, genuinely equal opportunities, because we think we can win the game. But who, really, in the end, is going to win this slippery game of escalating privileges?"
theatlantic  economics  politics  unitedstates 
june 2018 by lsouzek
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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june 2018 by tjames
Craig Cutler Introducing Crazy/Genius, a new podcast from The Atlantic with Derek Thompson. Eight bold questions—and eight smart answers—about how tech is…
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june 2018 by WillisWasabi
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem.
caviar  society  politics 
june 2018 by sieyin
The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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june 2018 by jt.http
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem. For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. May 22, 2018 at 02:41PM
june 2018 by colin.eide
The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2KvteTd
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june 2018 by jurvis
“The defining challenge of our time is to renew the promise of American democracy by reversing the calcifying effects of accelerating inequality. As long as inequality rules, reason will be absent from our politics; without reason, none of our other issues can be solved. It’s a world-historical problem.”
inequality  war  America  politics 
june 2018 by fumoboy007
Exactly the premise of this article.
from twitter
may 2018 by cpdis
e mortal enemies of our clan. Only much later in life did I learn that the stories about the Colonel and his tangles with titans fell far short of the truth.
may 2018 by vincenzo
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem. For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. via Pocket
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may 2018 by Pheelmore
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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may 2018 by divergio
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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may 2018 by stevenbedrick
The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2KvteTd
Instapaper 
may 2018 by alexrudy
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
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may 2018 by granth
A good invective on economic inequality, class, and stability in society.
economics  politics 
may 2018 by Mr0grog
This piece is going to stay with me for a long time.
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may 2018 by gnat
Craig Cutler 1. The Aristocracy Is Dead … For about a week every year in my childhood, I was a member of one of America’s fading aristocracies. Sometimes around…
from instapaper
may 2018 by ashaw
Il concetto dell'inequità economico/sociale applicato alla genetica?
laar 
may 2018 by jim.grendel
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem.
economics  inequality  politics  us  society 
may 2018 by soobrosa