2018 iPad Pro review: “What’s a computer?” | Ars Technica


14 bookmarks. First posted by aebraddy 8 days ago.


Early this year, Apple ran an ad that featured a young girl using an iPad as her primary computing device. An older woman asked the girl a question about her computer, and she responded, "What's a computer?" The ad was widely mocked. For starters, an iPad is a computer. via Pocket
Pocket 
yesterday by funkatron
Early this year, Apple ran an ad that featured a young girl using an iPad as her primary computing device. An older woman asked the girl a question about her computer, and she responded, "What's a computer?" The ad was widely mocked. For starters, an iPad is a computer. via Pocket
Pocket 
5 days ago by driptray
Software and applications With that kind of performance, the iPad Pro seems like it should make a strong case that it can replace powerful laptops as a…
from instapaper
7 days ago by svs
Samuel Axon:
<p>iOS is excellent software for phones, but it is not up to the task of driving creative professionals’ power user ambitions on a tablet—not even close. Copying, pasting, and editing text is an enormous hassle if you're doing anything other than scribbling a couple of notes or shooting off an email. The multitasking features expanded upon in iOS 11 are still neat, and the iPhone X-like gesture for swiping quickly between apps like you'd swipe between Spaces on a Mac is powerful. But using this machine, you'll be laboriously swiping between apps constantly to do the smallest things.

I already talked about the iPad Pro's frustrating limitations of the USB-C connection and the lack of OS-wide support for external drives. This stuff is essential for power users, and iOS just doesn't deliver. If you've ever used an iPad for productivity before, you know what I'm talking about. It's infuriatingly close, and it gets marginally closer with each passing year, yet it never quite seems to arrive.

The problems here are surprising in part because they are very un-Apple. The company’s pitch to consumers and professionals alike has always been about the advantages of end-to-end integration, and that includes software and hardware built to work well together. But iOS feels like it is built for a completely different device, given that the new iPad Pro's ambitions are much greater than those of prior iPads, or of the iPhone.

Then there's app support. The OS's limitations would be more tolerable if third-party (and first-party) apps picked up the slack, and the development tools are there to make it happen. Unfortunately, too many of the "pro" apps for the iPad Pro are deliberately stripped down for the tablet. And there are numerous tools that creatives and professionals would love to see on the iPad that just aren't there.</p>


I don't agree. I've written and edited most of a book on an iPad Pro; I've produced and edited and given presentations from one. His criticism of the music element - that there's no 3.5mm jack, and you need a wired connection for good audio editing - is strong on its face, but they you buy a <a href="https://www.hypershop.com/products/hyperdrive-solo-hub-for-usb-c-macbook-pc-devices">$80 7-in-1 USB-C dongle from Hypershop</a> which provides multiple USB-A, HDMI, SD, USB-C... and a 3.5mm jack.

Sure, dongles are an annoyance. But it's there.
apple  ipad  realwork  ipadpro 
7 days ago by charlesarthur
Yes, tablets and smartphones have replaced laptops and desktops among large numbers of young people for personal uses like social media, Web browsing, and games. And a select few robust applications like Photoshop and AutoCAD are making their way to the platform, challenging assumptions that a tablet should be a stripped-down, pinch hitting experience. The company hasn't been forthcoming with many technical details about the architecture, but a recent deep dive at Anandtech with its iPhone counterpart, the A12, suggested that increased cache sizes might be part of the equation. The A12X is the most interesting thing about the iPad Pro, so we went into considerably more detail in a related article—that piece also includes our interview with representatives at Apple about the company's in-house silicon strategy. If Apple had implemented this the way this product's target users wanted, I would have spent half this review joyously sharing all the nifty, powerful new things you can now do with an iPad.
7 days ago by sechilds
Software and applications With that kind of performance, the iPad Pro seems like it should make a strong case that it can replace powerful laptops as a…
from instapaper
7 days ago by scottsin
Software and applications With that kind of performance, the iPad Pro seems like it should make a strong case that it can replace powerful laptops as a…
from instapaper
8 days ago by adamparnes
the 2018 iPad Pro is both awe-inspiring and deeply disappointing. It offers performance unlike anything we've seen before in a mobile device. Its Pencil accessory is a truly powerful art tool. And a select few robust applications like Photoshop and AutoCAD are making their way to the platform, challenging preconceptions that a tablet should be a stripped-down, pitch hitting experience

But it became obvious within a day of use that iOS, otherwise an excellent operating system for phones, is still not designed with that kind of real work in mind. Limitations with how the new USB-C port can be used ultimately undermine the pitch that this tablet is a real workhorse ... The new iPad Pro tries to redefine computing, but in many ways, it feels like a tech demo for that redefinition, not the final product.
Apple 
8 days ago by zephyr777