Creation and consumption — Benedict Evans


57 bookmarks. First posted by ilicco 10 weeks ago.


There's a pretty common argument in tech that though of course there are billions more smartphones than PCs, and will be many more still, smartphones are not…
from instapaper
6 weeks ago by hutsonh
It seems to me that when people talk about what you ‘can’t’ do on a device, there are actually two different meanings of ‘can’t’ in computing. There is ‘can’t’ as meaning the feature doesn’t exist, and there is ‘can’t’ as meaning you don’t know how to do it. If you don’t know how to do it, the feature might as well not be there. So, there is what an expert can’t do on a smartphone or tablet that they could do on a PC. But then there are all of the things that a normal person (the other 90% or 95%) can’t do on a PC but can do on a smartphone, because the step change in user interface abstraction and simplicity means that they know how to do it on a phone and didn’t know how to do it on a PC. That is, the step change in user interface models that comes with the shift from Windows and Mac to iOS and Android is really a shift in the accessibility of capability. A small proportion of people might temporarily go from can to can’t, but vastly more go from can’t to can.
writing 
7 weeks ago by iagor
"There's a pretty common argument in tech that though of course there are billions more smartphones than PCs, and will be many more still, smartphones are not really the next computing platform, just a computing platform, because smartphones (and the tablets that derive from them) are only used for consumption where PCs are used for creation. You might look at your smartphone a lot, but once you need to create, you'll go back to a PC.

There are two pretty basic problems with this line of thinking. First, the idea that you cannot create on a smartphone or tablet assumes both that the software on the new device doesn't change and that the nature of the work won't change. Neither are good assumptions. "
analysis  technology  creativity  mobile  ios  android 
9 weeks ago by garrettc
Creation and consumption via Instapaper http://bit.ly/2vFgm5v
There's a pretty common argument in tech that though of course there are billions more smartphones than PCs, and will be many more still, smartphones are not…
instapaper 
9 weeks ago by patrick
RT : "...the shift from Windows and Mac to iOS and Android is really a shift in the accessibility of capability."
from twitter
9 weeks ago by Mykl
“A small proportion of people might temporarily go from can to can’t, but vastly more go from can’t to can.”
webdesign  computers  usability  mobile  trends  accessibility 
9 weeks ago by leereamsnyder
It seems to me that when people talk about what you ‘can’t’ do on a device, there are actually two different meanings of ‘can’t’ in computing. There is ‘can’t’ as meaning the feature doesn’t exist, and there is ‘can’t’ as meaning you don’t know how to do it. If you don’t know how to do it, the feature might as well not be there. So, there is what an expert can’t do on a smartphone or tablet that they could do on a PC. But then there are all of the things that a normal person (the other 90% or 95%) can’t do on a PC but can do on a smartphone, because the step change in user interface abstraction and simplicity means that they know how to do it on a phone and didn’t know how to do it on a PC. That is, the step change in user interface models that comes with the shift from Windows and Mac to iOS and Android is really a shift in the accessibility of capability. A small proportion of people might temporarily go from can to can’t, but vastly more go from can’t to can.
analysis  mobile  technology  future  computers  edtech 
9 weeks ago by the_alt
So, there are perhaps 100m people who today engage in some form of complex creation using what one might call 'sophisticated professional software' on a windows + mouse + keyboard-based personal computer. (I’ve outlined my workings and sources for this at the bottom). 

If less than 10% of PCs are actually doing professional, precise, complex creation, what are the other 90% being used for, if not creation?
mobile  technology  stats  data  computing  evans  benevans  talks 
10 weeks ago by ntschutta
here are actually two different meanings of ‘can’t’ in computing. There is ‘can’t’ as meaning the feature doesn’t exist, and there is ‘can’t’ as meaning you don’t know how to do it. If you don’t know how to do it, the feature might as well not be there. So, there is what an expert can’t do on a smartphone or tablet that they could do on a PC. But then there are all of the things that a normal person (the other 90% or 95%) can’t do on a PC but can do on a smartphone, because the step change in user interface abstraction and simplicity means that they know how to do it on a phone and didn’t know how to do it on a PC. That is, the step change in user interface models that comes with the shift from Windows and Mac to iOS and Android is really a shift in the accessibility of capability. A small proportion of people might temporarily go from can to can’t, but vastly more go from can’t to can. 
psychology  defintition  attitude 
10 weeks ago by gustavoluz
There's a pretty common argument in tech that though of course there are billions more smartphones than PCs, and will be many more still, smartphones are not…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by divigation
Benedict Evans: ‘Creation and Consumption’ – Feedbin Starred Entries for toph.allen@gmail.com
Feedbin 
10 weeks ago by toph
when people talk about what you ‘can’t’ do on a device, there are actually two different meanings of ‘can’t’ in computing. There is ‘can’t’ as meaning the feature doesn’t exist, and there is ‘can’t’ as meaning you don’t know how to do it. If you don’t know how to do it, the feature might as well not be there. So, there is what an expert can’t do on a smartphone or tablet that they could do on a PC. But then there are all of the things that a normal person (the other 90% or 95%) can’t do on a PC but can do on a smartphone, because the step change in user interface abstraction and simplicity means that they know how to do it on a phone and didn’t know how to do it on a PC. That is, the step change in user interface models that comes with the shift from Windows and Mac to iOS and Android is really a shift in the accessibility of capability. A small proportion of people might temporarily go from can to can’t, but vastly more go from can’t to can. 
mobile  usability  content  ux 
10 weeks ago by rmohns
There's a pretty common argument in tech that though of course there are billions more smartphones than PCs, and will be many more still, smartphones are not…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by stevenbedrick
Benedict Evans:

It seems to me that when people talk about what you ‘can’t’ do on a device, there are actually two different meanings of ‘can’t’ in computing. There is ‘can’t’ as meaning the feature doesn’t exist, and there is ‘can’t’ as meaning you don’t know how to do it. If you don’t know how to do it, the feature might as well not be there. So, there is what an expert can’t do on a smartphone or tablet that they could do on a PC. But then there are all of the things that a normal person (the other 90% or 95%) can’t do on a PC but can do on a smartphone, because the step change in user interface abstraction and simplicity means that they know how to do it on a phone and didn’t know how to do it on a PC. That is, the step change in user interface models that comes with the shift from Windows and Mac to iOS and Android is really a shift in the accessibility of capability. A small proportion of people might temporarily go from can to can’t, but vastly more go from can’t to can.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
10 weeks ago by rufous
from Daring Fireball

Benedict Evans:

It seems to me that when people talk about what you ‘can’t’ do on a device, there are actually two different meanings of ‘can’t’ in computing. There is ‘can’t’ as meaning the feature doesn’t exist, and there is ‘can’t’ as meaning you don’t know how to do it. If you don’t know how to do it, the feature might as well not be there. So, there is what an expert can’t do on a smartphone or tablet that they could do on a PC. But then there are all of the things that a normal person (the other 90% or 95%) can’t do on a PC but can do on a smartphone, because the step change in user interface abstraction and simplicity means that they know how to do it on a phone and didn’t know how to do it on a PC. That is, the step change in user interface models that comes with the shift from Windows and Mac to iOS and Android is really a shift in the accessibility of capability. A small proportion of people might temporarily go from can to can’t, but vastly more go from can’t to can.

 ★ 
ifttt  daringfireball 
10 weeks ago by josephschmitt
Ben is right--more is created now in-hand than with-mouse:
from twitter
10 weeks ago by topgold
“Vastly more is being created on mobile now by vastly more people than was ever created on PCs.”
from twitter
10 weeks ago by beeston
“My father-in-law prints things out by taking a photo of the computer screen and then taking his camera to the…”
from twitter
10 weeks ago by bdeskin
There's a pretty common argument in tech that though of course there are billions more smartphones than PCs, and will be many more still, smartphones are not really the next computing platform, just a computing platform, because smartphones (and the tablets that derive from them) are only u via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  benedict.evans  content  creation  pc 
10 weeks ago by jburkunk
So, 100m or so people are doing things on PCs now that can't be done on tablets or smartphones. Some portion of those tasks will change and become possible on mobile, and some portion of them will remain restricted to PCs for a long time. But there are another 3bn people who were using PCs (but mostly sharing them) but who weren't doing any of those things with them, and are now doing on mobile almost all of the stuff that they actually did do on PCs, plus a lot more. And, there's another 2bn or so people whose first computer of any kind is or will be a smartphone. 'Creation on PC, consumption on mobile' seems like a singularly bad way to describe this: vastly more is being created on mobile now by vastly more people than was ever created on PCs. 
mobile  stats  hardware  technology  makers  content  instagram 
10 weeks ago by dancall
So, 100m or so people are doing things on PCs now that can't be done on tablets or smartphones. Some portion of those tasks will change and become possible on mobile, and some portion of them will remain restricted to PCs for a long time. But there are another 3bn people who were using PCs (but mostly sharing them) but who weren't doing any of those things with them, and are now doing on mobile almost all of the stuff that they actually did do on PCs, plus a lot more. And, there's another 2bn or so people whose first computer of any kind is or will be a smartphone. 'Creation on PC, consumption on mobile' seems like a singularly bad way to describe this: vastly more is being created on mobile now by vastly more people than was ever created on PCs.
analysis 
10 weeks ago by my-flow
RT : 100m people create on PCs, 5bn create on mobile. ♻️
from twitter
10 weeks ago by gaelicWizard
100m people create on PCs, 5bn create on mobile. ♻️
from twitter_favs
10 weeks ago by peterood
RT : New post: Creation & consumption.
Far more is created on mobile now by far more people than was ever created on PCs
from twitter
10 weeks ago by moia
Creation and consumption excellent
from twitter
10 weeks ago by rickc57
There's a pretty common argument in tech that though of course there are billions more smartphones than PCs, and will be many more still, smartphones are not…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by mjbrej
New post: Creation & consumption.
Far more is created on mobile now by far more people than was ever created on PCs https://t.co/NUtiAoOfS6

— Benedict Evans (@BenedictEvans) July 14, 2017
Twitter  liked 
10 weeks ago by hochan
This is a brilliant technique that needs to be preserved for future generations
They looked at the pictures on the camera screen, or got them printed at a kiosk - but didn't print them until the card was full, as they often thought that you couldn’t add more pictures to the card after you’d ‘developed’ it in this way. My father-in-law prints things out by taking a photo of the computer screen and then taking...
2017-art  nice-thinking  a16z 
10 weeks ago by mozzarella
There's a pretty common argument in tech that though of course there are billions more smartphones than PCs, and will be many more still, smartphones are not…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by Shurs
Creation and consumption by // or "how I stopped worrying about precision pointers defining 'work'"
from twitter_favs
10 weeks ago by lesteph
New post: Creation & consumption.
Far more is created on mobile now by far more people than was ever created on PCs
from twitter_favs
10 weeks ago by ilicco