YouTube Comes To A 5-Star Realization: Its Ratings Are Useless | TechCrunch


14 bookmarks. First posted by rufous 6 weeks ago.


5-star vs thumbs up & down
business 
24 days ago by cvn
Why YouTube Switched From 5-Star Ratings to Thumbs Up/Down in 2009
from twitter
5 weeks ago by matthurst
Why YouTube Switched From 5-Star Ratings to Thumbs Up/Down in 2009
5 weeks ago by nimprojects
The graph above is hilarious. It represents the way in which people rate videos on YouTube. As you can see, there are some 1-stars and a huge amount of 5-stars, and then basically no 2, 3, or 4 stars. As such, YouTube has a blog post today admitting that maybe its star system isn’t the best way to vote on videos.
Of course, anyone who has used YouTube for an extended period of time will already know this. And really, the same seems to be true of basically all 1 to 5 star crowd rating systems. It’s easy to know if a video (or anything) is good or bad, but how on Earth do you determine if it’s 2 star, 3 star, or 4 star-worthy? Everyone likely has their own opinions about what would constitute those ratings, and naturally, they’re all completely subjective.
youtube  apps  store  rating  like 
6 weeks ago by rgl7194
"Why YouTube Switched From 5-Star Ratings to Thumbs Up/Down in 2009"
from twitter
6 weeks ago by peba
via Starred items from BazQux Reader http://ift.tt/1cAKc9M and IFTTT
Starred  items  from  BazQux  Reader 
6 weeks ago by stinkingpig
via Feedbin Starred Entries for joewiz@gmail.com
IFTTT  Feedbin  Starred  Entries  for  joewiz@gmail.com 
6 weeks ago by joewiz
from Daring Fireball

I got a lot of pushback from readers regarding my post yesterday supporting Netflix’s switch from a 5-star rating system to a simple thumbs up/down system. The gist of the complaints is that some people do carefully consider their star ratings, and do value the granularity of being able to say that you like/dislike something a little or a lot. But of course some people take that care. The problem is that most people don’t, and collectively, 5-star rating systems are garbage.

This post from YouTube back in 2009 shows it with data: when they had a 5-star rating system, the overwhelmingly most common rating was 5-stars. The next most common was the lowest, 1-star. 2-, 3-, and 4-star ratings were effectively never used.

For a personally curated collection, 5-star ratings can be meaningful. But for a recommendation service that averages ratings among all users, they are not. It’s the difference between designing for the ideal case of how people should behave versus designing for the practical case of how people actually behave.

 ★ 
ifttt  daringfireball 
6 weeks ago by josephschmitt
I got a lot of pushback from readers regarding my post yesterday supporting Netflix’s switch from a 5-star rating system to a simple thumbs up/down system. The gist of the complaints is that some people do carefully consider their star ratings, and do value the granularity of being able to say that you like/dislike something a little or a lot. But of course some people take that care. The problem is that most people don’t, and collectively, 5-star rating systems are garbage.

This post from YouTube back in 2009 shows it with data: when they had a 5-star rating system, the overwhelmingly most common rating was 5-stars. The next most common was the lowest, 1-star. 2-, 3-, and 4-star ratings were effectively never used.

For a personally curated collection, 5-star ratings can be meaningful. But for a recommendation service that averages ratings among all users, they are not. It’s the difference between designing for the ideal case of how people should behave versus designing for the practical case of how people actually behave.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
6 weeks ago by rufous