What renovations are worth doing? - Curbed


11 bookmarks. First posted by llitchi march 2018.


"A few months ago, I received an email from a woman who had bought a 1964 ranch with all its original interiors: wood paneling, Formica countertops, a blue bathroom, the works. She hosted a housewarming party for her friends and relatives. Six different people at the party asked her The Question: “So, when are you going to flip this place?” When they heard that she had no desire to flip the house, which she found to be interesting and charming, her guests were shocked and tried to convince her otherwise. She should try for a return on her investment; the house was dated; it would need future repairs. One guest called the house 'plain ugly' She asked me if I thought the guests were right: Should she think about remodeling?"

and

"Instead of falling prey to this thinking, take a moment to consider this simple idea: There is nothing wrong with your house.

Most of the time, this statement is true (especially if one lives in a house constructed relatively recently). The roof does not leak; the house is warm or cool when it needs to be; there are no structural or electrical issues; nothing is broken or needs to be replaced from routine wear and tear. Why, then, do so many of us feel dissatisfied with our perfectly fine houses?"

and

"Consciously or subconsciously, our constant remodeling is an effort to make ourselves more acceptable to others, something we should do as 'good' homeowners. Like the beauty industry, the home-improvement industry plays on (usually gendered) insecurity—the fear that we are unattractive or inadequate. But the truth is, 'other people' don’t have to live in your house, and when they come to visit, they’re there to see you, not your succulents and marble-and-brass side table. It’s time we reconsidered the house as a place instead of an object, to be lived in, rather than consumed; time we stopped thinking of a home as something that constantly has to be 'improved'; time we enjoyed the historicity of our old houses, or the personality of our new houses. It’s time for a new era: an era of house-positivity."
kate-wagner  hgtv  houses  homes  improvement  psychology  curbed 
21 days ago by actualitems
Why do we see our homes as in constant need of improvement?
architecture  article  culture 
5 weeks ago by jatstelnet
A few months ago, I received an email from a woman who had bought a 1964 ranch with all its original interiors: wood paneling, Formica countertops, a blue bathroom, the works. She hosted a housewarming party for her friends and relatives. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
march 2018 by archizoo
Renovations have become a national pastime, but there is nothing wrong with your house
article  topic:design 
march 2018 by meitachi
"Rustic modernism is the perfect example of the simulacrum, the copy for which no original exists: it is historical without much history, a color palette and vague ruralness masquerading as a pure American legacy. The truth is, though there are the occasional episodes featuring truly decrepit properties, the vast majority of the homes featured on the show have nothing wrong with them. In fact, the hosts have time and time again muddied up houses (especially midcentury modern ones) with genuinely authentic, or even irreplaceable, interiors."
architecture  buildings  housing  culture  essays  mcmansion-hell  hgtv  reality-television  economics 
march 2018 by brennen
Devon Banks A few months ago, I received an email from a woman who had bought a 1964 ranch with all its original interiors: wood paneling, Formica countertops,…
from instapaper
march 2018 by llitchi