Your smartphone is making you stupid, antisocial and unhealthy. So why can’t you put it down? - The Globe and Mail


104 bookmarks. First posted by alisonsinclair january 2018.


A decade ago, smart devices promised to change the way we think and interact, and they have – but not by making us smarter. Eric Andrew-Gee explores the growing body of scientific evidence that digital distraction is damaging our minds
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january 2018 by parkermalenke
I'M NOT AN ADDICT BUT I CAN SEE HOW SOME PEOPLE WOULD BE
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january 2018 by maoxian
Your smartphone is making you stupid, antisocial and unhealthy. So why can’t you put it down? via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2m1czMt
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january 2018 by lavallee
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january 2018 by iany
Favorite tweet:

Wait. @instagram strategically *withholds* "likes" from users that they believe might disengage hoping they'll be disappointed and recheck the app?! Harvesting painful insecurities. This is so messed up. https://t.co/tXs9R1T1zK http://pic.twitter.com/Yba9qfovnf

— Andy Coravos (@AndreaCoravos) January 12, 2018
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january 2018 by paulreid
It takes office workers an average of 25 minutes to get back on task after an interruption, he notes, while workers who are habitually interrupted by e-mail become likelier to "self-interrupt" with little procrastination breaks.
psychology  culture  distraction  attention 
january 2018 by libbymiller
more, more, more.

Nice that this article cites both Sean Parker's and Chamath's talks. And another interesting social media mental model: given the 'always with us' nature of smartphones, and how they're used to access apps algorithmically tuned to get out attention - the human mind finally meets its match in battling The Algorithm.
But while previous generations may have cried wolf about new media, "it's different this time," Mr. Harris says. Unlike TVs and desktop computers, which are typically relegated to a den or home office, smartphones go with us everywhere. And they know us. The stories that pop up in your iPhone newsfeed and your social media apps are selected by algorithms to grab your eye.

Smartphones are "literally using the power of billion-dollar computers to figure out what to feed you," Mr. Harris said. That's why you can't look away.

What about The Algorithm as entity? Maybe that's already been covered somewhere, but --

I remember Eddie from Standing Rock, showing me how to blast FB live posts to the top of the feed by something akin to like-hacking. Eddie didn't know much about tech, or even have a computer (the phone he was using was shared with this brother) - but he'd interacted enough with FB to learn the algorithm's behaviour, and how to use it to his advantage. Bottom-up reverse engineering, in this case to spread a message, a cause.

I wonder what the internal codenames for algorithms are, at the tech monopolies' dev divisions - I'm willing to bet they are revealing in some way or other. This article does point out an interesting bit of 'common knowledge' from the dev perspective - a strategy of withholding the dopamine release to encourage repeat visits, used by Instagram:
Matt Mayberry, who works at a California startup called Dopamine Labs, says it's common knowledge in the industry that Instagram exploits this craving by strategically withholding "likes" from certain users. If the photo-sharing app decides you need to use the service more often, it'll show only a fraction of the likes you've received on a given post at first, hoping you'll be disappointed with your haul and check back again in a minute or two. "They're tying in to your greatest insecurities," Mr. Mayberry said.
social-media  nice-thinking 
january 2018 by mozzarella
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january 2018 by jgillman
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january 2018 by jburkunk
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january 2018 by ericaheinz
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january 2018 by louderthan10
The evidence for this goes beyond the carping of Luddites. It's there, cold and hard, in a growing body of research by psychiatrists, neuroscientists, marketers and public health experts. What these people say – and what their research shows – is that smartphones are causing real damage to our minds and relationships, measurable in seconds shaved off the average attention span, reduced brain power, declines in work-life balance and hours less of family time.

They have impaired our ability to remember. They make it more difficult to daydream and think creatively. They make us more vulnerable to anxiety. They make parents ignore their children. And they are addictive, if not in the contested clinical sense then for all intents and purposes.

Consider this: In the first five years of the smartphone era, the proportion of Americans who said internet use interfered with their family time nearly tripled, from 11 per cent to 28 per cent. And this: Smartphone use takes about the same cognitive toll as losing a full night's sleep. In other words, they are making us worse at being alone and worse at being together.

Ten years into the smartphone experiment, we may be reaching a tipping point. Buoyed by mounting evidence and a growing chorus of tech-world jeremiahs, smartphone users are beginning to recognize the downside of the convenient little mini-computer we keep pressed against our thigh or cradled in our palm, not to mention buzzing on our bedside table while we sleep.

Nowhere is the dawning awareness of the problem with smartphones more acute than in the California idylls that created them. Last year, ex-employees of Google, Apple and Facebook, including former top executives, began raising the alarm about smartphones and social media apps, warning especially of their effects on children.

...Yes, people are always put off by the strange power of new technologies. Socrates thought writing would melt the brains of Athenian youths by undermining their ability to memorize. Erasmus cursed the "swarm of new books" plaguing post-Gutenberg Europe. In its infancy, TV was derided as a "vast wasteland."

But while previous generations may have cried wolf about new media, "it's different this time," Mr. Harris says. Unlike TVs and desktop computers, which are typically relegated to a den or home office, smartphones go with us everywhere. And they know us. The stories that pop up in your iPhone newsfeed and your social media apps are selected by algorithms to grab your eye.

Smartphones are "literally using the power of billion-dollar computers to figure out what to feed you," Mr. Harris said. That's why you can't look away.

Socrates was wrong about writing and Erasmus was wrong about books. But after all, the boy who cried wolf was eaten in the end. And in smartphones, our brains may have finally met their match.

"It's Homo sapiens minds against the most powerful supercomputers and billions of dollars …. It's like bringing a knife to a space laser fight," Mr. Harris said. "We're going to look back and say, 'Why on earth did we do this?'"

...Maybe it's best for children to learn young that their parents frequently find their phone more absorbing than them, because they will learn sooner or later. Catherine Steiner-Adair, a clinical psychologist and research associate in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, interviewed 1,000 kids between the ages of 4 and 18 for her 2013 book The Big Disconnect. Many of them said they no longer run to the door to greet their parents because the adults are so often on their phones when they get home.

And it gets worse once they're through the door. One of the smartphone's terrible, mysterious powers, from a child's perspective, is its ability "to pull you away instantly, anywhere, anytime," Dr. Steiner-Adair writes. Because what's happening on the smartphone screen is inscrutable to others, parents often seem to have simply gotten sucked into another dimension, leaving their kid behind. "To children, the feeling is often one of endless frustration, fatigue and loss."

The digital drift affecting families shows up in national statistics. The Center for the Digital Future, an American think tank, found that between 2006 and 2011, the average number of hours American families spent together per month dropped by nearly a third, from 26 to about 18.
smartphones  social-media 
january 2018 by thegrandnarrative
In the winter of 1906, the year San Francisco was destroyed by an earthquake and SOS became the international distress signal, Britain's Punch magazine published a dark joke about the future of technology.
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january 2018 by plouf
In the winter of 1906, the year San Francisco was destroyed by an earthquake and SOS became the international distress signal, Britain's Punch magazine published a dark joke about the future of technology.
january 2018 by AnthonyBaker
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january 2018 by mattl
Your smartphone is making you stupid, antisocial and unhealthy. So why can’t you put it down?
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january 2018 by jamescampbell
" They have impaired our ability to remember. They make it more difficult to daydream and think creatively. They make us more vulnerable to anxiety. They make parents ignore their children. And they are addictive, if not in the contested clinical sense then for all intents and purposes.

Consider this: In the first five years of the smartphone era, the proportion of Americans who said internet use interfered with their family time nearly tripled, from 11 per cent to 28 per cent. And this: Smartphone use takes about the same cognitive toll as losing a full night's sleep. In other words, they are making us worse at being alone and worse at being together. "
mobile-disease 
january 2018 by kellyramsey
RT : Oh, yeah - I meant to share it originally.
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january 2018 by noahsussman
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january 2018 by mrtoto
A decade ago, smart devices promised to change the way we think and interact, and they have – but not by making us smarter. Eric Andrew-Gee explores the growing body of scientific evidence that digital distraction is damaging our minds
smartphone  psychology  damage  readings 
january 2018 by aldolat
RT : Link to story. Worth a read.
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january 2018 by kohlmannj
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january 2018 by mjbrej
Your smartphone is making you stupid, antisocial and unhealthy. So why can’t you put it down? /via
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january 2018 by hdrapin
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january 2018 by kslimbs
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january 2018 by christos
We're doomed! Interesting for this bit: "It takes office workers an average of 25 minutes to get back on task after an interruption, he notes, while workers who are habitually interrupted by e-mail become likelier to "self-interrupt" with little procrastination breaks". That's true of me: if I'm constantly getting interrupted I give up and procastinate in anticipation of the next interruption.
technology  culture  psychology  smartphones  facebook  work 
january 2018 by pw201
A decade ago, smart devices promised to change the way we think and interact, and they have – but not by making us smarter. Eric Andrew-Gee explores the growing body of scientific evidence that digital distraction is damaging our minds
mobile  psychology  society 
january 2018 by SimonHurtz
In the winter of 1906, the year San Francisco was destroyed by an earthquake and SOS became the international distress signal, Britain's Punch magazine published a dark joke about the future of technology.
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january 2018 by neilscott
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january 2018 by leftyotter
Your smartphone is making you stupid, antisocial and unhealthy. So why can’t you put it down?
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january 2018 by edan
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january 2018 by cyflychwr
In the winter of 1906, the year San Francisco was destroyed by an earthquake and SOS became the international distress signal, Britain's Punch magazine published a dark joke about the future of technology.
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january 2018 by peterjblack
The growing evidence that digital distraction is damaging our minds
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