Elementary-School Curriculum Is All Wrong - The Atlantic


14 bookmarks. First posted by phaustin 8 days ago.


At first glance, the classroom I was visiting at a high-poverty school in Washington, D.C., seemed like a model of industriousness. The teacher sat at a desk in the corner, going over student work, while the first graders quietly filled out a worksheet intended to develop their reading skills.
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yesterday by dvand5
"In the early grades, U.S. schools value reading-comprehension skills over knowledge. The results are devastating, especially for poor kids."

All of which raises a disturbing question: What if the medicine we have been prescribing is only making matters worse, particularly for poor children? What if the best way to boost reading comprehension is not to drill kids on discrete skills but to teach them, as early as possible, the very things we’ve marginalized—including history, science, and other content that could build the knowledge and vocabulary they need to understand both written texts and the world around them?
In the late 1980s, two researchers in Wisconsin, Donna Recht and Lauren Leslie, designed an ingenious experiment to try to determine the extent to which a child’s reading comprehension depends on her prior knowledge of a topic. ...
It turned out that prior knowledge of baseball made a huge difference in students’ ability to understand the text—more so than their supposed reading level.
education  fail  education_fail 
2 days ago by jimmykduong
At first glance, the classroom I was visiting at a high-poverty school in Washington, D.C., seemed like a model of industriousness. The teacher sat at a desk in the corner, going over student work, while the first graders quietly filled out a worksheet intended to develop their reading skills. via Pocket
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2 days ago by domingogallardo
That girl’s assignment was merely one example, albeit an egregious one, of a standard pedagogical approach. American elementary education has been shaped by a theory that goes like this: Reading—a term used to mean not just matching letters to sounds but also comprehension—can be taught in a manner completely disconnected from content. Use simple texts to teach children how to find the main idea, make inferences, draw conclusions, and so on, and eventually they’ll be able to apply those skills to grasp the meaning of anything put in front of them.
freire_project  education  pedagogy 
4 days ago by jfbeatty
“One Rand Corporation survey of teachers found that 95 percent of elementary-school teachers resort to Google for materials and lesson plans; 86 percent turn to Pinterest.” https://t.co/0xxd44cBCo Interesting read about reading. pic.twitter.com/1MU6L8Ueif

— Will Richardson (@willrich45) July 11, 2019
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6 days ago by willrichardson
Justyna Stasik A t first glance, the classroom I was visiting at a high-poverty school in Washington, D.C., seemed like a model of industriousness. The teacher…
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7 days ago by johnrclark
reading comprehension needs both reading skills and knowledge about the thing you are reading so if you improve kids general knowledge they do better at reading as they are more likely to understand what they are are reading. Plus, they enjoy learning about things more than learning skills in isolation.
education  reading 
7 days ago by mr_stru
Elementary Education Has Gone Terribly Wrong Content without context is generally a bad ide…
from twitter
7 days ago by tellio
In the early grades, U.S. schools value reading-comprehension skills over knowledge. The results are devastating, especially for poor kids.
reading  education  kids  learning  failure  humanities  epistemology 
7 days ago by basemaly
Elementary Education Has Gone Terribly Wrong
8 days ago by tptacek