The Case for Climate Rage – Popula


26 bookmarks. First posted by KMP 29 days ago.


RT : It's exactly shit like Franzen's essay in the that prompted me to write this:
from twitter
8 days ago by trs
Of course we did it to ourselves; we had always been intellectually lazy, and the less asked of us, the less we had to say. We all lived for money, and that is what we died for. You wouldn’t have to do much in rewrites to Independence Day to reboot it as cli-fi. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
8 days ago by schmitz
emotional und mit vielen science-links: guter überblick über us-perspektive
klimawandel 
8 days ago by MicrowebOrg
Of course we did it to ourselves; we had always been intellectually lazy, and the less asked of us, the less we had to say. We all lived for money, and that is what we died for. You wouldn’t have to do much in rewrites to Independence Day to reboot it as cli-fi. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
8 days ago by tayhatmaker
RT : It's exactly shit like Franzen's essay in the that prompted me to write this:
from twitter
9 days ago by davidvc
RT : It's exactly shit like Franzen's essay in the that prompted me to write this:
from twitter
9 days ago by rossgrady
RT : this is pure 🔥 by ⁦⁩: the case for climate rage
from twitter
21 days ago by wspr
This story of “us” consuming our way to oblivion, with the oil companies innocently fulfilling “our” insatiable greed for fuel, is just a lie.
capitalism  climatechange  future 
25 days ago by isaacsmith
RT : "People in power have never willingly dismantled the systems that benefit them."
from twitter_favs
27 days ago by dalcrose
People in power have never willingly dismantled the systems that benefit them. Thus David Wallace-Wells earned an eye-popping advance for The Uninhabitable Earth, a book in which he makes some solid and necessary points, and then concludes, in the absence of credible evidence, that “we,” who are responsible for climate change, will solve it with geoengineering; Nathaniel Rich was given a whole issue of the New York Times Magazine in which to wax poetic about “our” failure to stop climate change, a story optioned almost instantly for a book and a film; Jonathan Safran Foer will soon join them with his own version of the “we are all to blame” narrative, We Are the Weather, in which he argues first, incorrectly, that human diets are the primary cause of climate change, and then that “we” need to tackle it by making the necessary lifestyle changes. There are more, believe. The system explicitly rewards these men for visualizing the future as a parallel system that leaves the patriarchal, capitalist pyramid intact. It’s all they know how to imagine, and all the rest of us are permitted to imagine: a future in which the right politicians, coupled with the right scientists and corporate executives, will turn climate change into an opportunity, not a crisis, with jobs and profits for all!

It’s an epic saga in which they are the heroes, an apocalyptic sci-fi video game or movie in which a few good men will just get rid of the bad guys in the third act. No need to dismantle patriarchy and white supremacy, envision a different and better way of living, re-think economic and societal structures, or remove power over the fate of humanity from the hands of a self-interested few.

[…]

There was also a lot of talk back then about natural gas stores and how to make them profitable, and eventually US companies developed the technology to do just that (via hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”), and exported it around the world. When other countries said no thanks to contaminating their water sources for the sake of natural gas, U.S. companies said no worries, we’ll frack here and export it. That’s one reason the U.S. became the world’s number-one energy supplier and why, at a time when scientists are saying we need to have started on a path toward zero emissions yesterday, global emissions are climbing.

How exactly was the general public supposed to stop that?

[…]

Rather than imagining an industrial or corporate-friendly response to the crisis, what it would look like to shut down fossil fuel production tomorrow? What if conversations about “adaptation” focused on acclimating to that new reality?

It matters because the same patriarchal elites have remained comfortably in power for so long that their imaginations are unequal to the task we face. Arguments for civility, for “forgiveness,” for “we’re all in this together”, for a preservation of the status quo with just a few tweaks, won’t keep us all from going over the cliff.
climatechange  capitalism 
27 days ago by matthewmcvickar
In climate change, many of these elite white men might be experiencing their very first brush with imposed change, with a force beyond their control upending their lives; that might make them particularly ill-equipped to envision what’s next, let alone lead us there.
future  climatechange  crisis 
27 days ago by mirthe

By @amywestervelt , one of the best pieces on climate change I’ve ever read. Such an important critique of “climate dudes” & the white capitalist patriarchy at the root of the climate catastrophe. If I could, I’d tweet every sentence: https://popula.com/2019/08/19/the-case-for-climate-rage/
climate_change  climate 
27 days ago by amy
Of course we did it to ourselves; we had always been intellectually lazy, and the less asked of us, the less we had to say. We all lived for money, and that is…
from instapaper
27 days ago by stoleaglance
Of course we did it to ourselves; we had always been intellectually lazy, and the less asked of us, the less we had to say. We all lived for money, and that is…
from instapaper
28 days ago by louderthan10