Implementing Webmentions


24 bookmarks. First posted by davidhund 10 weeks ago.


There continues to be significant thought on how to create the goo things about the social web in the open or IndieWeb. Webmentions are a modern take on the old blog [pingbacks](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pingback). I've enabled my site with them using [webmention.io](https://webmention.io).
6 weeks ago by thingles
In a world before social media, a lot of online communities existed around blog comments. The particular community I was part of – web standards – was all built up around the personal websites of those involved.
Pocket 
8 weeks ago by iiska
As social media sites gained traction, those communities moved away from blog commenting systems. Instead of reacting to a post underneath the post, most people will now react with a URL someplace else. That might be a tweet, a Reddit post, a Facebook emission, basically anywhere that combines an audience with the ability to comment on a URL.
comments  indieweb  webdevelopment  perch  webmentions 
8 weeks ago by garrettc
Webmention is a W3C Recommendation that solves a big part of this. It describes a system for one site to notify another when it links to it. It’s similar in concept to Pingback for those who remember that, just with all the lessons learned from Pingback informing the design.
comments  webmentions  webdev  pingback 
9 weeks ago by hp
Implementing Webmentions ::

(Allow people to post a response to something you've published with just a URL)
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by locuna
Implementing Webmentions
from twitter
9 weeks ago by jackysee
webmentions
developer 
10 weeks ago by terraling
Webmentions are on the rise… wrote a great post about implementing them for Perch CMS:
from twitter
10 weeks ago by matthiasott
Drew McLellan:
<p>In a world before social media, a lot of online communities existed around blog comments. The particular community I was part of – web standards – was all built up around the personal websites of those involved.

As social media sites gained traction, those communities moved away from blog commenting systems. Instead of reacting to a post underneath the post, most people will now react with a URL someplace else. That might be a tweet, a Reddit post, a Facebook emission, basically anywhere that combines an audience with the ability to comment on a URL.


Whether you think that’s a good thing or not isn’t really worth debating – it’s just the way it is now, things change, no big deal. However, something valuable that has been lost is the ability to see others’ reactions when viewing a post. Comments from others can add so much to a post, and that overview is lost when the comments exist elsewhere.

Webmention is a W3C Recommendation that solves a big part of this. It describes a system for one site to notify another when it links to it. It’s similar in concept to Pingback for those who remember that, just with all the lessons learned from Pingback informing the design.</p>


I remember how pingback got turned into a spam problem so bad that most people - and stop me if this bit sounds familiar in this whole debate - turned it off. Yup, any system that scales and allows anyone to contribute will have a spam problem. It will also, now, have a "mad troll" problem, if one thinks the two are different.

The problem with comments is not in systems for allowing comments. It's in what people want to put into their comments: most has zero value, even to the commenter.
comments 
10 weeks ago by charlesarthur
Comments are 1990s technology. What I discovered implementing webmentions:
from twitter_favs
10 weeks ago by davidhund