A Career Cold Start Algorithm


107 bookmarks. First posted by derk0pf march 2018.


The first step is to find someone on the team and ask for 30 minutes with them. In that meeting you have a simple agenda:

1. For the first 25 minutes: ask them to tell you everything they think you should know. Take copious notes. Only stop them to ask about things you don’t understand. Always stop them to ask about things you don’t understand.
2. For the next 3 minutes: ask about the biggest challenges the team has right now.
3. In the final 2 minutes: ask who else you should talk to. Write down every name they give you.

Repeat the above process for every name you're given. Don’t stop until there are no new names.
advice  career  programming 
10 weeks ago by quad
via Pocket - A Career Cold Start Algorithm - Added March 09, 2018 at 11:28AM
personal  development  programming 
may 2018 by mikele
For the first 25 minutes: ask them to tell you everything they think you should know. For the next 3 minutes: ask about the biggest challenges the team has right now. In the final 2 minutes: ask who else you should talk to. Repeat the above process for every name you're given. Don’t stop until there are no new names.
engineering  leadership  advice  management  culture  tech 
april 2018 by spaceninja
A Career Cold Start Algorithm
via:instapaper  from instapaper
march 2018 by miikka
The first step is to find someone on the team and ask for 30 minutes with them. In that meeting you have a simple agenda:

For the first 25 minutes: ask them to tell you everything they think you should know. Take copious notes. Only stop them to ask about things you don’t understand. Always stop them to ask about things you don’t understand.
For the next 3 minutes: ask about the biggest challenges the team has right now.
In the final 2 minutes: ask who else you should talk to. Write down every name they give you.
management  professional 
march 2018 by mike
Several times in my career, I’ve joined a team whose work was already well under way, where I had a massive knowledge deficit, and didn’t have pre-existing relationships. None of those excuses relieved me from the pressure I felt to establish myself and contribute. via Pocket
Pocket 
march 2018 by LaptopHeaven
A practical approach if you join an established company or team as a new person and want to become knowledgeable as quickly as possible. Essentially you sit down with everyone and ask them three questions.
UX 
march 2018 by ahobday
The first step is to find someone on the team and ask for 30 minutes with them. In that meeting you have a simple agenda:

For the first 25 minutes: ask them to tell you everything they think you should know. Take copious notes. Only stop them to ask about things you don’t understand. Always stop them to ask about things you don’t understand.
For the next 3 minutes: ask about the biggest challenges the team has right now.
In the final 2 minutes: ask who else you should talk to. Write down every name they give you.
Repeat the above process for every name you're given. Don’t stop until there are no new names.
advice  career 
march 2018 by JorgeAranda
Several times in my career, I’ve joined a team whose work was already well under way, where I had a massive knowledge deficit, and didn’t have pre-existing relationships...
career 
march 2018 by cowpi
(When starting at a new job)
career 
march 2018 by edraves
A Career Cold Start Algorithm -- Several times in my career, I’ve joined a team whose work was already well under way, where I had a massive knowledge deficit, and didn’t have pre-existing relationships. None of those excuses relieved me from the pressure I felt to establish myself and contribute. via Pocket on March 12, 2018 at 08:18PM
mustread 
march 2018 by dueyfinster
how to get up to speed quickly at a new place
career 
march 2018 by dceddia
Several times in my career, I’ve joined a team whose work was already well under way[...] Over time, I realized that the natural instinct to push for early impact leads many incoming leaders into challenging relationships[...] So, I developed an algorithm that has helped me ramp up quickly [...and] have an impact in a relatively short period of time, while minimizing collateral damage.
march 2018 by cmiller
The first step is to find someone on the team and ask for 30 minutes with them. In that meeting you have a simple agenda:

For the first 25 minutes: ask them to tell you everything they think you should know. Take copious notes. Only stop them to ask about things you don’t understand. Always stop them to ask about things you don’t understand.
For the next 3 minutes: ask about the biggest challenges the team has right now.
In the final 2 minutes: ask who else you should talk to. Write down every name they give you.
career  management  advice  engineering  careers  via:popular 
march 2018 by rauschen
A Career Cold Start Algorithm Several times in my career, I’ve joined a team whose work was already well under way, where I had a massive knowledge deficit, and…
from instapaper
march 2018 by flobosg
The first step is to find someone on the team and ask for 30 minutes with them. In that meeting you have a simple agenda:

For the first 25 minutes: ask them to tell you everything they think you should know. Take copious notes. Only stop them to ask about things you don’t understand. Always stop them to ask about things you don’t understand.
For the next 3 minutes: ask about the biggest challenges the team has right now.
In the final 2 minutes: ask who else you should talk to. Write down every name they give you.
work 
march 2018 by bfulop
Ask people who else to talk to until you run out of names.
management  advice  engineering 
march 2018 by mechazoidal
Several times in my career, I’ve joined a team whose work was already well under way, where I had a massive knowledge deficit, and didn’t have pre-existing relationships. None of those excuses relieved me from the pressure I felt to establish myself and contribute. Over time, I realized that the natural instinct to push for early impact leads many incoming leaders into challenging relationships as they expose their knowledge deficit and waste time. So, I developed an algorithm that has helped me ramp up quickly — and in several cases — have an impact in a relatively short period of time, while minimizing collateral damage.
advice  career  management  projectmanagement 
march 2018 by tysone
Interesting algorithm for quickly coming up to speed with a new team:

+ Ask for a 30-min meeting.
+ For first 25 mins, ask them to tell you everything they think you should know.
+ For next 3 mins: what are the biggest challenges the team has right now?
+ For final 3 mins: who else should I talk to?

Repeat until you have no more names.

Would be interesting in conjunction with Anki.
gtd  career  management  advice 
march 2018 by mnielsen