FCC Accuses Stealthy Startup of Launching Rogue Satellites - IEEE Spectrum


24 bookmarks. First posted by stevestrohpb march 2018.


Photo: Antrix India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle rocket launched on 12 January 2018. On 12 January, a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket blasted…
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march 2018 by johnrclark
The U.S. communications agency says tiny Internet of Things satellites from Swarm Technologies could endanger other spacecraft
articles  space  satellites  start-up 
march 2018 by gmisra
On 12 January, a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket blasted off from India’s eastern coast. While its primary cargo was a large Indian mapping satellite, dozens of secondary CubeSats from other countries travelled along with it.

Also on board were four small satellites that probably should not have been there. SpaceBee-1, 2, 3, and 4 were briefly described by the Indian space agency ISRO as “two-way satellite communications and data relay” devices from the United States. No operator was specified, and only ISRO publicly noted that they successfully reached orbit the same day.

IEEE Spectrum can reveal that the SpaceBees are almost certainly the first spacecraft from a Silicon Valley startup called Swarm Technologies, currently still in stealth mode. Swarm was founded in 2016 by one engineer who developed a spacecraft concept for Google and another who sold his previous company to Apple. The SpaceBees were built as technology demonstrators for a new space-based Internet of Things communications network.
universe  transportation  crime 
march 2018 by lehmannro
Mark Harris:
<p>On 12 January, a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket blasted off from India’s eastern coast. While its primary cargo was a large Indian mapping satellite, dozens of secondary CubeSats from other countries travelled along with it. Seattle-based Planetary Resources supplied a spacecraft that will test prospecting tools for future asteroid miners, Canadian company Telesat launched a broadband communications satellite, and a British Earth-observation mission called Carbonite will capture high-definition video of the planet’s surface.

Also on board were four small satellites that probably should not have been there. SpaceBee-1, 2, 3, and 4 were briefly described by the Indian space agency ISRO as “two-way satellite communications and data relay” devices from the United States. No operator was specified, and only ISRO publicly noted that they successfully reached orbit the same day.

IEEE Spectrum can reveal that the SpaceBees are almost certainly the first spacecraft from a Silicon Valley startup called Swarm Technologies, currently still in stealth mode. Swarm was founded in 2016 by one engineer who developed a spacecraft concept for Google and another who sold his previous company to Apple. The SpaceBees were built as technology demonstrators for a new space-based Internet of Things communications network.</p>


You may think: what has the FCC got to do with satellites launched in India? Turns out there's an <a href="https://space.stackexchange.com/questions/25981/might-isros-2018-004-launch-be-at-least-a-technical-violation-of-the-outer-spac">international treaty</a> about what you can launch into space, and both the US and India are signatories. The suggestion from that Stack Exchange discussion is that India is responsible for any damage the satellites cause.

More to the point, do we need an IoT in space?
satellite  space  startup 
march 2018 by charlesarthur
"Federal Communications Commission (FCC) had dismissed Swarm’s application for its experimental satellites a month earlier, on safety grounds."

"On Wednesday, the FCC sent Swarm a letter revoking its authorization for a follow-up mission with four more satellites, due to launch next month. A pending application for a large market trial of Swarm’s system with two Fortune 100 companies could also be in jeopardy."

"An unauthorized launch would also call into question the ability of secondary satellite ‘ride-share’ companies and foreign launch providers to comply with U.S. space regulations."

"Swarm would provide solar-powered gateways that would collect data from nearby IoT devices using Bluetooth, LoRa, or Wi-Fi, then beam them up to an orbiting SpaceBee using VHF radio. When the SpaceBee passed over a ground station that was connected to the Internet, it would beam the data down again, and on to its end user."
FCC  enforcement  satellite  IoT  launch  space-debris 
march 2018 by pierredv
Unauthorized satellites are a thing.
from twitter
march 2018 by artlung
1) Uber’s attitude toward community standards… in space!
2) Space junk as startup fraud
3) BEES
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march 2018 by fkbarrett
RT : In space, no one can hear you regulate
from twitter
march 2018 by eivindingebrigtsen
A stealth startup just launched 4 satellites without approval from the FCC -
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march 2018 by photographer
Launch fast and break things is not always a sensible strategy and does not seem to war well in space.
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march 2018 by sinned
If confirmed, this would be the first ever unauthorized launch of commercial satellites.
legal  history  space  startup  usa  crime 
march 2018 by akamediasystem
In space, no one can hear you regulate
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march 2018 by sudonim
RT : FCC Accuses Stealthy Startup of Launching Rogue Satellites
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march 2018 by kejadlen
FCC Accuses Stealthy Startup of Launching Rogue Satellites http://ift.tt/2FCSU1s Prospective http://ift.tt/2Fo1gum March 9, 2018 at 08:37PM

The U.S. communications agency says tiny Internet of Things satellites from Swarm Technologies could endanger other spacecraft http://ift.tt/2BGBrAP IEEE Spectrum Aerospace http://ift.tt/2DTJni9 March 9, 2018 at 08:37PM
Prospective 
march 2018 by SergioWerner
nah, what the hell, move fast and break things and if there are any broken regs, apologise and/or counter sue later
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march 2018 by psychemedia