Ancient Rome’s Collapse Is Written Into Arctic Ice - The Atlantic


50 bookmarks. First posted by aebraddy may 2018.


(via @TGentetGanose ) Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic On March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous…
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25 days ago by evrenk
It is a new input in an argument—did plagues doom the Roman empire?—so careworn that even the 18th-century historian Edward Gibbon, who wrote 4,000 pages on Rome’s decline, wearied of debating it. And like the rest of the study, it will change how classicists like Seth Bernard go back to the primary sources.
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11 weeks ago by fmgagnon
Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic On March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous politicians—sturdy men, duly elected…
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11 weeks ago by johnrclark
Scientists can finally track the civilization’s economic booms and recessions—thanks to the exhaust of its massive coin-making operation, preserved for centuries in Greenland’s ice sheet. via Pocket
climate  newsletter  research 
12 weeks ago by thewavingcat
Ancient Rome’s Collapse Is Written Into Arctic Ice via Instapaper https://theatln.tc/2IUx4YG
Scientists can finally track the civilization’s economic booms and recessions—thanks to the exhaust of its massive coin-making operation, preserved for…
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may 2018 by patrick
Scientists can finally track the civilization’s economic booms and recessions—thanks to the exhaust of its massive coin-making operation, preserved for centuries in Greenland’s ice sheet. May 16, 2018 at 03:30AM
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may 2018 by colin.eide
Scientists can finally track the civilization’s economic booms and recessions—thanks to the exhaust of its massive coin-making operation, preserved for centuries in Greenland’s ice sheet.
may 2018 by sonicrocketman
Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic On March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous politicians—sturdy men, duly elected…
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may 2018 by breau
Neat work using arctic ice records as a proxy for Ancient Rome’s economic activity
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may 2018 by acdha
Ancient Rome’s Collapse Is Written Into Arctic Ice - The Atlantic - https://t.co/zpBX4XDBbK

— 𝕄𝕚𝕜𝕖 𝕃𝕪𝕟𝕔𝕙 (@bombinans) May 18, 2018
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may 2018 by mikelynch
ROBINSON MEYER MAY 15, 2018
Greenland  Artic  history  Romans  climate_change  proxies 
may 2018 by jerryking
Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic On March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous politicians—sturdy men, duly elected…
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may 2018 by AramZS
Scientists can finally track the civilization’s economic booms and recessions—thanks to the exhaust of its massive coin-making operation, preserved for centuries in Greenland’s ice sheet.
may 2018 by muffinista
Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic On March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous politicians—sturdy men, duly elected…
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may 2018 by yorlt
We can now read ancient Rome's economic booms and recessions... in Greenland's ice sheet, reports
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may 2018 by gordonr
Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic On March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous politicians—sturdy men, duly elected…
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may 2018 by artlung
RT : This is amazing.
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may 2018 by Iko
Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic On March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous politicians—sturdy men, duly elected…
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may 2018 by bcamper
Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic On March 15, some time ago, several dozen famous politicians—sturdy men, duly elected…
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may 2018 by mleduc
Oskari Porkka / Gilmanshin / Shutterstock / Katie Martin / The Atlantic Introducing Crazy/Genius, a new podcast from The Atlantic with Derek Thompson. Eight…
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may 2018 by joostvanderborg
But for all those years, the source material for the arguments have remained largely the same. Archeologists can locate new sites and excavate for coins, plates, or jewelry; scholars can read and reread Roman writers like Cicero, Sallust, and Catullus, who all documented Caesar. These have been the techniques for learning about Rome for centuries, and they are indispensable. But lately, they have been joined by something new.

On Monday, scientists announced the discovery of an entirely new resource that has the potential to remake some of those centuries-old arguments over Roman politics and history. A team of archeologists, historians, and climate scientists have constructed a history of Rome’s lead pollution, which allows them to approximate Mediterranean economic activity from 1,100 b.c. to 800 a.d. They found it hiding thousands of miles from the Roman Forum: deep in the Greenland Ice Sheet, the enormous, miles-thick plate of ice that entombs the North Atlantic island.

In short, they have reconstructed year-by-year economic data documenting the rise and fall of the Roman Republic and Empire. The first news of the record was published Monday afternoon in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


science ftw
%history  %science 
may 2018 by lemeb
We can now read ancient Rome's economic booms and recessions... in Greenland's ice sheet
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may 2018 by thatgoodnight
I read a LOT of climate-related studies. This is far and away the most fascinating one I’ve seen in a long time:
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may 2018 by mathewi
I read a LOT of climate-related studies. This is far and away the most fascinating one I’ve seen in a long time:
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may 2018 by TracyWMeyer
Scientists can finally track the civilization’s economic booms and recessions—thanks to the exhaust of its massive coin-making operation, preserved for centuries in Greenland’s ice sheet. via Pocket
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may 2018 by Werderbach
Lunch reading:



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may 2018 by vruba
Lunch reading:



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may 2018 by lalavalse