The Cornell Note-taking System – Learning Strategies Center


53 bookmarks. First posted by Jibarosoy november 2016.


What are Cornell Notes? A brief description of Cornell Notes.
classic  education 
4 days ago by dustinvenegas
What are Cornell Notes? A brief description of Cornell Notes
learning  notes 
8 days ago by aram
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the
lecture using telegraphic sentences.
2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on
the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify
meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen
memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying
later.
3. Recite: Cover the note-taking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking
at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say
aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas
indicated by the cue-words.
4. Reflect: Reflect on the material by asking yourself questions, for example:
“What’s the significance of these facts? What principle are they based on?
How can I apply them? How do they fit in with what I already know?
What’s beyond them?
5. Review: Spend at least ten minutes every week reviewing all your previous
notes. If you do, you
10 days ago by timk
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the
lecture using telegraphic sentences.
2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on
the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify
meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen
memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying
later.
3. Recite: Cover the note-taking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking
at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say
aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas
indicated by the cue-words.
4. Reflect: Reflect on the material by asking yourself questions, for example:
“What’s the significance of these facts? What principle are they based on?
How can I apply them? How do they fit in with what I already know?
What’s beyond them?
5. Review: Spend at least ten minutes every week reviewing all your previous
notes. If you do, you
11 days ago by samullen
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the
lecture using telegraphic sentences.
2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on
the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify
meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen
memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying
later.
3. Recite: Cover the note-taking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking
at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say
aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas
indicated by the cue-words.
4. Reflect: Reflect on the material by asking yourself questions, for example:
“What’s the significance of these facts? What principle are they based on?
How can I apply them? How do they fit in with what I already know?
What’s beyond them?
5. Review: Spend at least ten minutes every week reviewing all your previous
notes. If you do, you
11 days ago by samilton
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the
lecture using telegraphic sentences.
2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on
the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify
meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen
memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying
later.
3. Recite: Cover the note-taking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking
at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say
aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas
indicated by the cue-words.
4. Reflect: Reflect on the material by asking yourself questions, for example:
“What’s the significance of these facts? What principle are they based on?
How can I apply them? How do they fit in with what I already know?
What’s beyond them?
5. Review: Spend at least ten minutes every week reviewing all your previous
notes. If you do, you
note  taking  learning  communities  activities  faculty  development  LIUBLC  peer  teaching 
12 days ago by jellacious
The Cornell Note-taking System | Learning Strategies Center
fbinstar 
14 days ago by jjlsetter
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the
lecture using telegraphic sentences.
2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on
the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify
meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen
memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying
later.
3. Recite: Cover the note-taking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking
at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say
aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas
indicated by the cue-words.
4. Reflect: Reflect on the material by asking yourself questions, for example:
“What’s the significance of these facts? What principle are they based on?
How can I apply them? How do they fit in with what I already know?
What’s beyond them?
5. Review: Spend at least ten minutes every week reviewing all your previous
notes. If you do, you
14 days ago by jtemplet
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the lecture using telegraphic sentences.
2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying later.
3. Recite: Cover the note-taking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas indicated by the cue-words.
4. Reflect: Reflect on the material by asking yourself questions, for example: “What’s the significance of these facts? What principle are they based on? How can I apply them? How do they fit in with what I already know? What’s beyond them?
5. Review: Spend at least ten minutes every week reviewing all your previous notes. If you do, you’ll retain a great deal for current use, as well as, for the exam.
notes  cornell 
15 days ago by rpmuller
Description of a system for taking notes from lecture and learning the material well.
teaching 
15 days ago by mcherm
via Pocket - The Cornell Note-taking System – Learning Strategies Center - Added December 03, 2019 at 11:20AM
4 weeks ago by mikele
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the lecture using telegraphic sentences. 2. Questions: As soon after class as possible,…
from instapaper
6 weeks ago by johnrclark
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the
lecture using telegraphic sentences.
2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on
the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify
meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen
memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying
later.
notetaking  teaching 
may 2017 by verstehen
narrow column for questions (to be filled in after the class when reviewing the material), wide column for lecture notes.
notetaking  cornell 
february 2017 by raphman
1. Record: During the lecture, use the note-taking column to record the
lecture using telegraphic sentences.
2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on
the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify
meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen
memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying
later.
3. Recite: Cover the note-taking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking
at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say
aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas
indicated by the cue-words.
4. Reflect: Reflect on the material by asking yourself questions, for example:
“What’s the significance of these facts? What principle are they based on?
How can I apply them? How do they fit in with what I already know?
What’s beyond them?
5. Review: Spend at least ten minutes every week reviewing all your previous
notes. If you do, you
note  taking  learning  communities  activities  learning  communities  faculty  development  LIUBLC  peer  learning  teaching 
november 2016 by Jibarosoy