Escape to another world | 1843


59 bookmarks. First posted by nhaliday 10 days ago.


David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
yesterday by taonga
Are video games a good or bad place to disappear to?

What does the future look like if there isn't a social stigma against them? Black Mirror? How can we make video game playing productive?

Is tapping into the virtual world the start of the next concise world? AHhhhhh
future  culture  psychology 
2 days ago by mkatase
- changing gender roles, changing expectations of what they can achieve and escapism
gaming  consumerbehaviour  totwitter 
2 days ago by renaissancechambara
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that helped Caribbean content find a wider audience – before finishing business school at the University of Miami. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  instapaper 
3 days ago by drewcaldwell
Very good piece on the impact of "leisure luxuries" on work:
from twitter_favs
3 days ago by john_horton
A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective. But what does seem clear is that the choices we make in life are shaped by the options available to us. A society that dislikes the idea of young men gaming their days away should perhaps invest in more dynamic difficulty adjustment in real life. And a society which regards such adjustments as fundamentally unfair should be more tolerant of those who choose to spend their time in an alternate reality, enjoying the distractions and the succour it provides to those who feel that the outside world is more rigged than the game.
games  society  culture  blog 
3 days ago by rianvdm
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
3 days ago by lou31
Dit artikel is een heel goed argument tegen of voor een basisinkomen (ik neig naar tegen):
from twitter
3 days ago by alper
A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective.
4 days ago by souldoubt
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
5 days ago by kfinlayson
In the 1950s, futurists hoped we'd work way less. Now it's happening, and it doesn't seem so good.
from twitter_favs
6 days ago by alpinegizmo
"Stand back, however, and the implications are far more substantial than this. One can just about spot the vision of a distant, near-workless future in the habits of young gamers. If good things in life can be had for very little money, then working hard to have more than very little money looks less attractive. The history of the industrial era has been one in which technology has reduced the proportion of income devoted to necessities like food while providing vast new possibilities for consumption. As this happened, the hours worked by the typical person declined."
6 days ago by andrewpbrett
Mullings’s friends invited him to join them in playing Destiny, a “massively multi­player online game” (meaning that lots of different people around the world…
from instapaper
6 days ago by urbansheep
"As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big."
society  video-games  escapism  economics  mens-issues  sad  incentives  20s 
6 days ago by ilhan
As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big
economics  employment  videogames  psychology 
7 days ago by Chirael
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that helped Caribbean content find a wider audience – before finishing business school at the University of Miami.
IFTTT 
7 days ago by rwhe
As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big
7 days ago by scwebd
A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective. But what does seem clear is that the choices we make in life are shaped by the options available to us. A society that dislikes the idea of young men gaming their days away should perhaps invest in more dynamic difficulty adjustment in real life. And a society which regards such adjustments as fundamentally unfair should be more tolerant of those who choose to spend their time in an alternate reality, enjoying the distractions and the succour it provides to those who feel that the outside world is more rigged than the game.
work  labour  jobs  employment  unemployment  games  gaming  leisure  escapism  dctagged  dc:creator=AventRyan 
7 days ago by petej
Disturbingly close to home. I've played many of these games. A truly excellent long read. - The games were an escape from reality. Emily is a fan of the Fallout franchise: a series of role-playing games set in the future, after a nuclear apocalypse. Gaming lifted her mood, she tells me; achievements within them allowed her to feel that she was getting something right at a time when most things were going wrong. She knew it was only tricking her brain. She would beat herself up sometimes after playing for hours, rueing the potentially productive time lost to games. Now, in hindsight, she says she is glad she had the ability to escape for a while.
IFTTT  Facebook 
7 days ago by shaunkoh
As video games get better & job prospects worse, young men dropping out of jobs to spend… https://t.co/rCCRluQGdH https://t.co/7dCocKYS9i
7 days ago by wiobyrne
This is such a great story on video games destroying the will to work:
from twitter_favs
8 days ago by gpadgett
Gaming
news 
8 days ago by akvera
RT : Excellent, long piece reporting on how games are more alluring than crappy jobs for youth:
from twitter_favs
8 days ago by rtanglao
Excellent, long piece reporting on how games are more alluring than crappy jobs for youth:
from twitter_favs
8 days ago by willie
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
9 days ago by adrian802
As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big
news  org:anglo  org:biz  trends  economics  labor  gender  games  attention  org:mag  rhetoric  wonkish  stagnation  malaise  current-events 
10 days ago by nhaliday