Escape to another world | 1843


82 bookmarks. First posted by adrian802 march 2017.


As games improve, the terms of this trade-off change. Among those predisposed to the leisure-luxury life, better games mean people are quicker to swap working hours for gaming hours; given nes-era gaming technology, a twenty-something might decline an opportunity for overtime work to have a little longer with Mario and Luigi. Now, a part-time job might be all they are willing to do, so good are the worlds and characters waiting at home. For those with the means, any hour on the job i...
culture  economics  gaming 
june 2017 by MattieTK
As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality.
gaming  employment  economics  culture  games 
may 2017 by soobrosa
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
april 2017 by bdeskin
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
april 2017 by dylan
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
april 2017 by zseward
As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big
videogames  lifestyle  escapism  gaming  work  taglater 
april 2017 by ohhappydayne
In 2015, 22% of men in their 20's hadn't been employed for a year, live with their parents, and appear to be playing video games constantly

"As games improve, the terms of this trade-off change. Among those predisposed to the leisure-luxury life, better games mean people are quicker to swap working hours for gaming hours; given nes-era gaming technology, a twenty-something might decline an opportunity for overtime work to have a little longer with Mario and Luigi. Now, a part-time job might be all they are willing to do, so good are the worlds and characters waiting at home. For those with the means, any hour on the job is an hour too much."

Gaming while young is pleasurable but risky because when you get older and your tastes change and become more expensive, you won't have had a career built.

"One can just about spot the vision of a distant, near-workless future in the habits of young gamers. If good things in life can be had for very little money, then working hard to have more than very little money looks less attractive."

[[
“Underemployment” – work in a position for which one is overqualified – has risen steadily since the beginning of the millennium; the share of recent college graduates working in jobs which did not require a college degree rose from just over 30% in the early 2000s to nearly 45% a decade later.

A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective. But what does seem clear is that the choices we make in life are shaped by the options available to us. A society that dislikes the idea of young men gaming their days away should perhaps invest in more dynamic difficulty adjustment in real life. And a society which regards such adjustments as fundamentally unfair should be more tolerant of those who choose to spend their time in an alternate reality, enjoying the distractions and the succour it provides to those who feel that the outside world is more rigged than the game.]]
gaming  unemployment  time  job  economics 
april 2017 by dandv
Put differently, it's the social connections, when one lacks any meaningful ones, and recognizes the absence.
from twitter_favs
april 2017 by gourock_swimming
Recommended by Cowen, but found it contains distinct flavors of ERE.

"People work for many reasons – to occupy their time, to find purpose in life and to contribute to society, among other things – but the need to earn money typically comes top of the list. Money puts food on the table, clothes in the wardrobe and a roof overhead. Yet these days, satisfying those needs in the most basic way does not take an especially large income, particularly for those with the option of depending on family members for assistance. The reason to work harder and earn more than the minimum needed to survive is, in part, the desire to have something more than the bare necessities – nice meals, rather than the cheapest calories available, a car, holidays abroad, a home full of books and art. Much of the work we do is intended to earn the money to afford a few luxuries to add to our comfort and enrich our lives.
Yet we face a trade-off. The harder we work, the less time we have to enjoy the luxuries our labour affords us. The more lavish the luxuries we seek, the more we must earn to acquire them, and the longer and harder we find ourselves working."
economics  politics  dystopia  ere  cowen 
march 2017 by olepig
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that helped Caribbean content find a wider audience – before finishing business school at the University of Miami. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  appletipps  gaming  tr 
march 2017 by hansdorsch
Video games and universal basic income and the beginning of our virtual cocooning.
economics 
march 2017 by hypcourt
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
march 2017 by taonga
Are video games a good or bad place to disappear to?

What does the future look like if there isn't a social stigma against them? Black Mirror? How can we make video game playing productive?

Is tapping into the virtual world the start of the next concise world? AHhhhhh
future  culture  psychology 
march 2017 by mkatase
- changing gender roles, changing expectations of what they can achieve and escapism
gaming  consumerbehaviour 
march 2017 by renaissancechambara
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that helped Caribbean content find a wider audience – before finishing business school at the University of Miami. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  instapaper 
march 2017 by drewcaldwell
Very good piece on the impact of "leisure luxuries" on work:
from twitter_favs
march 2017 by john_horton
A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective. But what does seem clear is that the choices we make in life are shaped by the options available to us. A society that dislikes the idea of young men gaming their days away should perhaps invest in more dynamic difficulty adjustment in real life. And a society which regards such adjustments as fundamentally unfair should be more tolerant of those who choose to spend their time in an alternate reality, enjoying the distractions and the succour it provides to those who feel that the outside world is more rigged than the game.
games  society  culture  blog 
march 2017 by rianvdm
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
march 2017 by lou31
Dit artikel is een heel goed argument tegen of voor een basisinkomen (ik neig naar tegen):
from twitter
march 2017 by alper
A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective.
march 2017 by souldoubt
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that…
from instapaper
march 2017 by kfinlayson
In the 1950s, futurists hoped we'd work way less. Now it's happening, and it doesn't seem so good.
from twitter_favs
march 2017 by alpinegizmo
"Stand back, however, and the implications are far more substantial than this. One can just about spot the vision of a distant, near-workless future in the habits of young gamers. If good things in life can be had for very little money, then working hard to have more than very little money looks less attractive. The history of the industrial era has been one in which technology has reduced the proportion of income devoted to necessities like food while providing vast new possibilities for consumption. As this happened, the hours worked by the typical person declined."
march 2017 by andrewpbrett
Mullings’s friends invited him to join them in playing Destiny, a “massively multi­player online game” (meaning that lots of different people around the world…
from instapaper
march 2017 by urbansheep
As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big
video_games_are_srs_bsns  we're_so_fucked  from pocket
march 2017 by anaximander
"As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big."
society  video-games  escapism  economics  mens-issues  sad  incentives  20s 
march 2017 by ilhan
As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big
economics  employment  videogames  psychology 
march 2017 by Chirael
David Mullings was always a self-starter. Born in Jamaica, he moved to Florida to go to university, and founded his first company – a digital media firm that helped Caribbean content find a wider audience – before finishing business school at the University of Miami.
march 2017 by rwhe
As video games get better and job prospects worse, more young men are dropping out of the job market to spend their time in an alternate reality. Ryan Avent suspects this is the beginning of something big
march 2017 by scwebd
A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective. But what does seem clear is that the choices we make in life are shaped by the options available to us. A society that dislikes the idea of young men gaming their days away should perhaps invest in more dynamic difficulty adjustment in real life. And a society which regards such adjustments as fundamentally unfair should be more tolerant of those who choose to spend their time in an alternate reality, enjoying the distractions and the succour it provides to those who feel that the outside world is more rigged than the game.
work  labour  jobs  employment  unemployment  games  gaming  leisure  escapism  dctagged  dc:creator=AventRyan 
march 2017 by petej
Disturbingly close to home. I've played many of these games. A truly excellent long read. - The games were an escape from reality. Emily is a fan of the Fallout franchise: a series of role-playing games set in the future, after a nuclear apocalypse. Gaming lifted her mood, she tells me; achievements within them allowed her to feel that she was getting something right at a time when most things were going wrong. She knew it was only tricking her brain. She would beat herself up sometimes after playing for hours, rueing the potentially productive time lost to games. Now, in hindsight, she says she is glad she had the ability to escape for a while.
IFTTT  Facebook 
march 2017 by shaunkoh
As video games get better & job prospects worse, young men dropping out of jobs to spend… https://t.co/rCCRluQGdH https://t.co/7dCocKYS9i
march 2017 by wiobyrne
This is such a great story on video games destroying the will to work:
from twitter_favs
march 2017 by gpadgett
RT : Excellent, long piece reporting on how games are more alluring than crappy jobs for youth:
from twitter
march 2017 by dave_sullivan
Gaming
news 
march 2017 by akvera
RT : Excellent, long piece reporting on how games are more alluring than crappy jobs for youth:
from twitter_favs
march 2017 by rtanglao
Excellent, long piece reporting on how games are more alluring than crappy jobs for youth:
from twitter_favs
march 2017 by willie