No Share Buttons on Mobile Sites (Except This One Weird Case) | Big Medium


106 bookmarks. First posted by paulhhowells march 2017.


> Don’t include social share buttons in small-screen websites, unless the user just tapped through from a social network.
sharing  social  ux  mobile 
11 weeks ago by barryf
Only show share buttons to people coming in from mobile networks and only show a couple and make their source network the major one.
design  social  sharing  ux 
august 2017 by traggett
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
social  design  ux  sharing  IFTTT  mobile  web  share  Unread  socialmedia 
july 2017 by electrolusty
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button—like even once—according to a Moovweb study . We found similarly tiny numbers during…
from instapaper
july 2017 by josedante
Josh Clark, back in March: Hey, please, under no circumstances should you pin social buttons to the top or bottom of mobile screens. In an effort to try to…
from instapaper
july 2017 by johnrclark
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
socialmedia  mobile  ux 
july 2017 by cspanring
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
web  web:design 
july 2017 by sechilds
The rule: only include share buttons if user is coming from a social network.
mobile  social  design  via:popular 
june 2017 by pb
Don’t include social share buttons in small-screen websites, unless the user just tapped through from a social network.
mobile  ux  social 
june 2017 by Gwendoux
bigmedium.com gives preferred size and placement to the button for the referring social network (Twitter at left, Facebook at right).
sharing  evidence  design  mobile  social  ux 
june 2017 by tobymilner
For small screens, always show share buttons for visits originating from a social network. (Set a cookie and show buttons for subsequent visits, too.)

For all other small-screen visitors, don’t show share buttons.

For larger screens, always show share buttons; usage is high enough to be valuable.
design  social  sharing  mobile  ux 
june 2017 by tedw
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
UX  productmanagement 
june 2017 by rchrd_h
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button—like even once—according to a Moovweb study . We found similarly tiny numbers during…
from instapaper
june 2017 by thecosas
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
mobile  ux  social  sharing  share  frontend  socialmedia 
june 2017 by RyanRoberts
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button—like even once—according to a Moovweb study. We found similarly tiny numbers during our research designing Philly.com and verticals for About.com. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  feedly 
june 2017 by schmitz
File under: dickbars don't work.

Hey, please, under no circumstances should you pin social buttons to the top or bottom of mobile screens. In an effort to try to boost mobile use of share buttons, About.com experimented with fixing them to screen bottom and separately to screen top, so that the buttons were always visible when scrolling. While this did modestly increase share-button usage, it also caused overall session engagement to go down.

You read that right: adding a locked toolbar to the small-screen experience shortened sessions and reduced page views. The very small increase in share-button usage was far outweighed by reduced site usage.
mobile  ux  design  web  webdesign  usability 
june 2017 by jefframnani
via Starred items from BazQux Reader http://ift.tt/1cAKc9M and IFTTT
Starred  items  from  BazQux  Reader 
june 2017 by stinkingpig
Dickbars Don’t Work
june 2017 by nimprojects
bigmedium.com
social-media  ux 
june 2017 by alwerner
"Adding a locked toolbar to the small-screen experience shortened sessions and reduced page views"
from twitter
june 2017 by edelagrave
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button—like even once—according to a Moovweb study . We found similarly tiny numbers during…
from instapaper
june 2017 by scottsin
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button—like even once—according to a Moovweb study. We found similarly tiny numbers during our research designing Philly.com and verticals for About.com. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
june 2017 by trisignia
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button—like even once
ux  issr 
june 2017 by joostvanderborg
via Daring Fireball http://ift.tt/1wWZ3qV
june 2017 by radii0
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button—like even once—according to a Moovweb study . We found similarly tiny numbers during…
from instapaper
june 2017 by adrianhon
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
design  ux 
june 2017 by cbotwell
Josh Clark, back in March:

Hey, please, under no circumstances should you pin social buttons to the top or bottom of mobile screens. In an effort to try to boost mobile use of share buttons, About.com experimented with fixing them to screen bottom and separately to screen top, so that the buttons were always visible when scrolling. While this did modestly increase share-button usage, it also caused overall session engagement to go down.

You read that right: adding a locked toolbar to the small-screen experience shortened sessions and reduced page views. The very small increase in share-button usage was far outweighed by reduced site usage. (I can’t explain why this is the case, but I’ve seen it elsewhere with locked toolbars, too. They chase small-screen users away.)

Read the whole article. First, Clark’s advice is based on actual results, not just opinion and hunches (like mine). Second, he doesn’t advice against ever showing custom sharing buttons — but he does say only to show them to visitors coming from social media referrals. And but even then, don’t put them in fixed position dickbars.

As for why dickbars actually decrease site usage, I think the answer is obvious: when people see user-hostile fixed position bars at the top and/or bottom of their display, especially on phones, they’re annoyed, and the easiest way to eliminate the annoyance is to close the fucking tab and move on to something that isn’t annoying.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
june 2017 by rufous
from Daring Fireball

Josh Clark, back in March:

Hey, please, under no circumstances should you pin social buttons to the top or bottom of mobile screens. In an effort to try to boost mobile use of share buttons, About.com experimented with fixing them to screen bottom and separately to screen top, so that the buttons were always visible when scrolling. While this did modestly increase share-button usage, it also caused overall session engagement to go down.

You read that right: adding a locked toolbar to the small-screen experience shortened sessions and reduced page views. The very small increase in share-button usage was far outweighed by reduced site usage. (I can’t explain why this is the case, but I’ve seen it elsewhere with locked toolbars, too. They chase small-screen users away.)

Read the whole article. First, Clark’s advice is based on actual results, not just opinion and hunches (like mine). Second, he doesn’t advice against ever showing custom sharing buttons — but he does say only to show them to visitors coming from social media referrals. And but even then, don’t put them in fixed position dickbars.

As for why dickbars actually decrease site usage, I think the answer is obvious: when people see user-hostile fixed position bars at the top and/or bottom of their display, especially on phones, they’re annoyed, and the easiest way to eliminate the annoyance is to close the fucking tab and move on to something that isn’t annoying.

 ★ 
ifttt  daringfireball 
june 2017 by josephschmitt
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
june 2017 by mfessler
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don't even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network."
social  sharing  ux  bestpractices  research 
april 2017 by spaceninja
Don’t include social share buttons in small-screen websites, unless the user just tapped through from a social network.
mobile  ux  sharinglinks  socialmedia  socialsoftware  via:danielmall  by:bigmediumjosh 
march 2017 by dirtystylus
Don't include share buttons on mobile websites ... unless the visitor arrived from a mobile site.
mobile  sharing  sharebuttons  webdev 
march 2017 by angusm
"under normal circumstances there are lots of reasons to avoid pinny any kind of toolbar to the top or bottom of small-screen browsers. But for social buttons, it’s multiplied by the stark fact that most users simply don’t want to use your custom buttons in the first place"
social_network  share  button  UX  mobile  clevermarks 
march 2017 by nhoizey
Don’t use share buttons on mobile sites, unless… via
from twitter_favs
march 2017 by girma
been wondering a bit if this will change with full screen PWAs. Something to keep an eye on.
from twitter
march 2017 by grigs
New rule: Don’t include social share buttons in mobile sites, unless user just tapped through from a social network
march 2017 by Werderbach
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
research  socialmedia  socialbookmarking 
march 2017 by devolute
No Share Buttons on Mobile Sites (Except This One Weird Case) | Big Medium
from twitter
march 2017 by kemie
IDEA: evolvere i responsive buttons per includere questa logica
march 2017 by andrea_sdl
Only 2 out of every 1000 mobile web users ever tap a custom share button. Don’t even bother including them in mobile sites except when users are coming from a social network.
march 2017 by creditcardnumber
To be clear: people do share a ton of webpages to those services from mobile devices, but it happens through other means—using browsers’ built-in sharing tools or copying the URL directly into a social post. Mobile users have established their own sharing habits, in other words, and for the vast majority, those habits don’t involve share buttons embedded in the page canvas.
march 2017 by jamesacklin