Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. - The New York Times


55 bookmarks. First posted by drewcaldwell 9 weeks ago.


Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2x5yd8J
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22 days ago by alexrudy
U.S. unemployment is down and jobs are going unfilled. But for people without much education, the real question is: Do those jobs pay enough to live on?
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4 weeks ago by dontran
Rather than hold itself accountable, America reverses roles by blaming the poor for their own miseries. Here is the blueprint. First, valorize work as the ticket out of poverty, and debase caregiving as not work. Look at a single mother without a formal job, and say she is not working; spot one working part time and demand she work more. Transform love into laziness. Next, force the poor to log more hours in a labor market that treats them as expendables. Rest assured that you can pay them little and deny them sick time and health insurance because the American taxpayer will step in, subsidizing programs like the earned-income tax credit and food stamps on which your work force will rely. Watch welfare spending increase while the poverty rate stagnates because, well, you are hoarding profits. When that happens, skirt responsibility by blaming the safety net itself. From there, politicians will invent new ways of denying families relief, like slapping unrealistic work requirements on aid for the poor.

Democrats may scoff at Republicans’ work requirements, but they have yet to challenge the dominant conception of poverty that feeds such meanspirited politics. Instead of offering a counternarrative to America’s moral trope of deservedness, liberals have generally submitted to it, perhaps even embraced it, figuring that the public will not support aid that doesn’t demand that the poor subject themselves to the low-paying jobs now available to them.
politics  government  sigh  FAVORITES 
6 weeks ago by wahbahdoo
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2x5yd8J
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7 weeks ago by TypingPixels
These days, we’re told that the American economy is strong. Unemployment is down, the Dow Jones industrial average is north of 25,000 and millions of jobs are going unfilled. But for people like Vanessa, the question is not, Can I land a job? (The answer is almost certainly, Yes, you can.) Instead the question is, What kinds of jobs are available to people without much education? By and large, the answer is: jobs that do not pay enough to live on.

In recent decades, the nation’s tremendous economic growth has not led to broad social uplift. Economists call it the “productivity-pay gap” — the fact that over the last 40 years, the economy has expanded and corporate profits have risen, but real wages have remained flat for workers without a college education. Since 1973, American productivity has increased by 77 percent, while hourly pay has grown by only 12 percent. If the federal minimum wage tracked productivity, it would be more than $20 an hour, not today’s poverty wage of $7.25.

American workers are being shut out of the profits they are helping to generate. The decline of unions is a big reason. During the 20th century, inequality in America decreased when unionization increased, but economic transformations and political attacks have crippled organized labor, emboldening corporate interests and disempowering the rank and file. This imbalanced economy explains why America’s poverty rate has remained consistent over the past several decades, even as per capita welfare spending has increased. It’s not that safety-net programs don’t help; on the contrary, they lift millions of families above the poverty line each year. But one of the most effective antipoverty solutions is a decent-paying job, and those have become scarce for people like Vanessa. Today, 41.7 million laborers — nearly a third of the American work force — earn less than $12 an hour, and almost none of their employers offer health insurance.
Economics  inequality  jobs 
8 weeks ago by cnk
The house of Vanessa Solivan’s mother, right of garden. Credit Credit Devin Yalkin for The New York Times V enessa Solivan and her three children fled their…
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8 weeks ago by adrianhon
RT : Facts worth knowing - Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. via
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8 weeks ago by aistettner
Instead of offering a counternarrative to America’s moral trope of deservedness, liberals have generally submitted to it, perhaps even embraced it, figuring that the public will not support aid that doesn’t demand that the poor subject themselves to the low-paying jobs now available to them. Even stalwarts of the progressive movement seem to reserve economic prosperity for the full-time worker.
poverty  economy  america  homelessness  fusechange 
8 weeks ago by corrales
The house of Vanessa Solivan’s mother, right of garden. Credit Credit Devin Yalkin for The New York Times V enessa Solivan and her three children fled their…
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9 weeks ago by mjbrej
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not.
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9 weeks ago by edenman
"U.S. unemployment is down and jobs are going unfilled. But for people without much education, the real question is: Do those jobs pay enough to live on?"
poverty  economy  politics 
9 weeks ago by jimmykduong
But rather than hold itself accountable, America reverses roles by blaming the poor for their own miseries.

Here is the blueprint. First, valorize work as the ticket out of poverty, and debase caregiving as not work. Look at a single mother without a formal job, and say she is not working; spot one working part time and demand she work more. Transform love into laziness. Next, force the poor to log more hours in a labor market that treats them as expendables. Rest assured that you can pay them little and deny them sick time and health insurance because the American taxpayer will step in, subsidizing programs like the earned-income tax credit and food stamps on which your work force will rely. Watch welfare spending increase while the poverty rate stagnates because, well, you are hoarding profits. When that happens, skirt responsibility by blaming the safety net itself. From there, politicians will invent new ways of denying families relief, like slapping unrealistic work requirements on aid for the poor.

As I watched this young man identify with Smith’s character, it dawned on me that what his parents, preachers, teachers, coaches and guidance counselors had told him for motivation — “Study hard, stick to it, dream big and you will be successful” — had been internalized as a theory of life.

---

We need a new language for talking about poverty. “Nobody who works should be poor,” we say. That’s not good enough. Nobody in America should be poor, period. No single mother struggling to raise children on her own; no formerly incarcerated man who has served his time; no young heroin user struggling with addiction and pain; no retired bus driver whose pension was squandered; nobody. And if we respect hard work, then we should reward it, instead of deploying this value to shame the poor and justify our unconscionable and growing inequality. “I’ve worked hard to get where I am,” you might say. Well, sure. But Vanessa has worked hard to get where she is, too.
USA  economy  poverty  jobs  pay  wages  employment  outsourcing  zeroHours  insecurity  precarity  socialMobility  workEthic  welfare  workfare  TrumpDonald  blame 
9 weeks ago by petej
Just work 5 different shitty jobs so you can pay the rent! AMERICA!
Poverty  Inequality  Employment  Economy  Income  Wealth 
9 weeks ago by Membranophonist
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. via
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9 weeks ago by bdusablon
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2x5yd8J
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9 weeks ago by sshappell
These days, we’re told that the American economy is strong. Unemployment is down, the Dow Jones industrial average is north of 25,000 and millions of jobs are going unfilled. But for people like Vanessa, the question is not, Can I land a job? (The answer is almost certainly, Yes, you can.) Instead the question is, What kinds of jobs are available to people without much education? By and large, the answer is: jobs that do not pay enough to live on.

In recent decades, the nation’s tremendous economic growth has not led to broad social uplift. Economists call it the “productivity-pay gap” — the fact that over the last 40 years, the economy has expanded and corporate profits have risen, but real wages have remained flat for workers without a college education. Since 1973, American productivity has increased by 77 percent, while hourly pay has grown by only 12 percent. If the federal minimum wage tracked productivity, it would be more than $20 an hour, not today’s poverty wage of $7.25.
jobs  indeed  economy 
9 weeks ago by kevnull
RT atmostbeautiful : 가난은 게으름 탓, 일을 안 해서라는 통념은 옳은가. 미 경제 호조에 주가 높고 기업이윤 높지만 실질임금은 정체. 임금으로 생계 충당 안 되는 저학력 저소득 워킹 푸어 갈수록 는다. 일하는 복지의 실패. ‘쫓겨난 사람들’로 퓰리처상 받은 매튜 데스몬드의 강력한 르포. http://bit.ly/2MoZ9Ft September 13, 2018 at 07:05AM http://twitter.com/atmostbeautiful/status/1039998444461424640
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9 weeks ago by seoulrain
"Democrats may scoff at Republicans’ work requirements, but they have yet to challenge the dominant conception of poverty that feeds such meanspirited politics. Instead of offering a counternarrative to America’s moral trope of deservedness, liberals have generally submitted to it, perhaps even embraced it, figuring that the public will not support aid that doesn’t demand that the poor subject themselves to the low-paying jobs now available to them. Even stalwarts of the progressive movement seem to reserve economic prosperity for the full-time worker. Senator Bernie Sanders once declared, echoing a long line of Democrats who have come before and after him, “Nobody who works 40 hours a week should be living in poverty.”

[...]

That’s not good enough. Nobody in America should be poor, period. No single mother struggling to raise children on her own; no formerly incarcerated man who has served his time; no young heroin user struggling with addiction and pain; no retired bus driver whose pension was squandered; nobody. And if we respect hard work, then we should reward it, instead of deploying this value to shame the poor and justify our unconscionable and growing inequality."
9 weeks ago by mattsteadman
Here is the blueprint. First, valorize work as the ticket out of poverty, and debase caregiving as not work. Look at a single mother without a formal job, and say she is not working; spot one working part time and demand she work more. Transform love into laziness.
poverty 
9 weeks ago by MF_reads
New York Times, 9/11/2018
News  MustRead  Jobs  Poverty  unemployment  minimumwage 
9 weeks ago by jwjnational
"Do those jobs pay enough to live on?"
United+States  clippings  living+wage  poverty  jobs  domestic+policy  economy 
9 weeks ago by mjb
The house of Vanessa Solivan’s mother, right of garden. Credit Credit Devin Yalkin for The New York Times V enessa Solivan and her three children fled their…
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9 weeks ago by zsoltika
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not.
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9 weeks ago by ciocci
The house of Vanessa Solivan’s mother, right of garden. Credit Credit Devin Yalkin for The New York Times V enessa Solivan and her three children fled their…
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9 weeks ago by bkerr
U.S. unemployment is down and jobs are going unfilled. But for people without much education, the real question is: Do those jobs pay enough to live on?
poverty 
9 weeks ago by daniel.zappala
Favorite tweet: DanielLurie

Please read this...
“When Americans see a homeless man cocooned in blankets, we often wonder how he failed. When the French see the same man, they wonder how the state failed him.” https://t.co/yuadLMdLZX

— Daniel Lurie (@DanielLurie) September 11, 2018

http://twitter.com/DanielLurie/status/1039648287022669824
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9 weeks ago by tswaterman
The house of Vanessa Solivan’s mother, right of garden. Credit Credit Devin Yalkin for The New York Times V enessa Solivan and her three children fled their…
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9 weeks ago by davejavou
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2x5yd8J
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9 weeks ago by chetan
The house of Vanessa Solivan’s mother, right of garden. Credit Credit Devin Yalkin for The New York Times V enessa Solivan and her three children fled their…
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9 weeks ago by kohlmannj
The house of Vanessa Solivan’s mother, right of garden. Credit Credit Devin Yalkin for The New York Times V enessa Solivan and her three children fled their…
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9 weeks ago by timwburch
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9 weeks ago by rtanglao
Vanessa Solivan and her three children fled their last place in June 2015, after a young man was shot and killed around the corner. They found a floor to sleep on in Vanessa’s parents’ home on North Clinton Avenue in East Trenton. It wasn’t a safer neighborhood, but it was a known one. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago by egwillim
Venessa Solivan and her three children fled their last place in June 2015, after a young man was shot and killed around the corner. They found a floor to sleep on in Vanessa’s parents’ home on North Clinton Avenue in East Trenton. It wasn’t a safer neighborhood, but it was a known one. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago by drewcaldwell