NSA officials worried about the day its potent hacking tool would get loose. Then it did. - The Washington Post


20 bookmarks. First posted by Buffalo_Goku may 2017.


When the National Security Agency began using a new hacking tool called EternalBlue, those entrusted with deploying it marveled at both its uncommon power and the widespread havoc it could wreak if it ever got loose. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  reading 
may 2017 by letphilsing55
The consequences of the NSA’s decision to keep the flaw secret, combined with its failure to keep the tool secure, became clear Friday when reports began spreading of a massive cyberattack in which the WannaCry software encrypted data on hundreds of thousands of computers and demanded a ransom to decrypt it.
may 2017 by SecurityFeed
When the National Security Agency began using a new hacking tool called EternalBlue, those entrusted with deploying it marveled at both its uncommon power and…
from instapaper
may 2017 by timwburch
RT : [[[MUST READ]]] NSA officials worried about the day its potent hacking tool would get loose. Then it did.
from twitter
may 2017 by gaelicWizard
When the National Security Agency began using a new hacking tool called EternalBlue, those entrusted with deploying it marveled at both its uncommon power and…
from instapaper
may 2017 by johnrclark
When the National Security Agency began using a new hacking tool called EternalBlue, those entrusted with deploying it marveled at both its uncommon power and the widespread havoc it could wreak if it ever got loose. Some officials even discussed whether the flaw was so dangerous they should reveal it to Microsoft, the company whose software the government was exploiting, according to former NSA employees who spoke on the condition of anonymity given the sensitivity of the issue. But for more than five years, the NSA kept using it — through a time period that has seen several serious security breaches — and now the officials’ worst fears have been realized. The malicious code at the heart of the WannaCry virus that hit computer systems globally late last week was apparently stolen from the NSA, repackaged by cybercriminals and unleashed on the world for a cyberattack that now ranks as among the most disruptive in history. The failure to keep EternalBlue out of the hands of criminals and other adversaries casts the NSA’s decisions in a harsh new light, prompting critics to question anew whether the agency can be trusted to develop and protect such potent hacking tools.
wp, 16.05.2017
land_usa  geheimdienst_us_nsa_tao_cna_cne  itsicherheit_malware_spyware  itsicherheit_os  itsicherheit_exploit_flaw  kriminalität_cracker_blackhat  itsicherheit_datensicherheit  unternehmen_microsoft  software_os_windows 
may 2017 by kraven
The global backlash to the Snowden revelations added urgency to the government’s efforts to revamp rules on when to report flaws to companies and when to use them for surveillance. Alexander said that about 90 percent of discovered flaws are reported to the companies that make the software.
windows  security  policy 
may 2017 by jasonsamuels
When the National Security Agency began using a new hacking tool called EternalBlue, those entrusted with deploying it marveled at both its uncommon power and the widespread havoc it could wreak if it ever got loose.

The agency eventually warned Microsoft after learning about EternalBlue’s theft, allowing the company to prepare a software patch issued in March. But the Shadow Brokers did not just release the flaw, which would take time and talent to turn into a tool. They released the exploits, which means even a novice hacker could use them to cause damage.
may 2017 by hakan
I think the most exciting part of this article is they found a second stock image of the NSA building to use.
from twitter_favs
may 2017 by emerose
I think the most exciting part of this article is they found a second stock image of the NSA building to use.
from twitter_favs
may 2017 by peterood
I think the most exciting part of this article is they found a second stock image of the NSA building to use.
from twitter_favs
may 2017 by joseph
And yet the idea that gov should have master keys to encryption is still a thing
from twitter
may 2017 by pberry
When the National Security Agency began using a new hacking tool called EternalBlue, those entrusted with deploying it marveled at both its uncommon power and…
from instapaper
may 2017 by yudha87
When the National Security Agency began using a new hacking tool called EternalBlue, those entrusted with deploying it marveled at both its uncommon power and…
from instapaper
may 2017 by hybridsolidr
When the National Security Agency began using a new hacking tool called EternalBlue, those entrusted with deploying it marveled at both its uncommon power and…
from instapaper
may 2017 by dabigc
Officials feared release... http://ift.tt/2qq2igR
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may 2017 by Buffalo_Goku