Special sunglasses, license-plate dresses, Juggalo face paint: How to be anonymous in the age of surveillance | The Seattle Times


21 bookmarks. First posted by bigiain 15 days ago.


A fringe movement of privacy advocates are experimenting with clothes, makeup and accessories as a defense against some surveillance technologies. Some wearers desire to opt-out of “surveillance capitalism,” while others...
privacy  surveillance  facialrecognition 
10 days ago by cothrun
The frames of his sunglasses, from Chicago-based eyewear line Reflectacles, are made of a material that reflects the infrared light found in surveillance…
from instapaper
11 days ago by indirect
Cory Doctorow’s sunglasses are seemingly ordinary. But they are far from it when seen on security footage, where his face is transformed into a glowing white…
from instapaper
11 days ago by johnrclark
via Pocket - Special sunglasses, license-plate dresses: How to be anonymous in the age of surveillance - Added January 16, 2020 at 11:09AM
IFTTT  Pocket 
11 days ago by williger
Melissa Hellmann:
<p>Daniel Castro, the vice president of nonprofit think tank Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, believes the error rates could be reduced by comparing images to a wider range of databases that are more diverse.

Facial recognition systems have proved effective in pursuing criminal investigation leads, he said, and are more accurate than humans at verifying people’s identities at border crossings. The development of policies and practices around the retention and usage of data could avoid government misuse, he said.

“The general use of this technology in the United States is very reasonable,” said Castro. “They’re being undertaken by police agencies that are trying to balance communities’ public safety interests with individual privacy.”

Still, in Doctorow’s eyes, the glasses serve as a conversation starter about the perils of granting governments and companies unbridled access to our personal data.

The motivation to seek out antidotes to an over-powerful force has political and symbolic significance for Doctorow, an L.A.-based science-fiction author and privacy advocate. His father’s family fled the Soviet Union, which used surveillance to control the masses.

“We are entirely too sanguine about the idea that surveillance technologies will be built by people we agree with for goals we are happy to support,” he said. “For this technology to be developed and for there to be no countermeasures is a road map to tyranny.”</p>
privacy  surveillance  technology  anonymity 
14 days ago by charlesarthur
How to be anonymous in the age of surveillance
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15 days ago by typhon
A fringe movement of privacy advocates are experimenting with clothes, makeup and accessories as a defense against some surveillance technologies. Some wearers desire to opt-out of “surveillance capitalism,” while others...
15 days ago by briandrum