What if We Stopped Pretending the Climate Apocalypse Can Be Stopped? | The New Yorker


45 bookmarks. First posted by ningwie 9 days ago.


here is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose characters strive for ostensibly reachable goals and, tragically or amusingly, never manage to get any closer to them. But it seems to me, in our rapidly darkening world, that the converse of Kafka’s quip is equally true: There is no hope, except for us.

I’m talking, of course, about climate change.
climate  newyorker  toread  change 
3 hours ago by edsonm
What if We Stopped Pretending the Climate Apocalypse Can Be Stopped?
from twitter
yesterday by gyaresu
All-out war on climate change made sense only as long as it was winnable. Once you accept that we’ve lost it, other kinds of action take on greater meaning. Preparing for fires and floods and refugees is a directly pertinent example. But the impending catastrophe heightens the urgency of almost any world-improving action. In times of increasing chaos, people seek protection in tribalism and armed force, rather than in the rule of law, and our best defense against this kind of dystopia is to maintain functioning democracies, functioning legal systems, functioning communities. In this respect, any movement toward a more just and civil society can now be considered a meaningful climate action. Securing fair elections is a climate action. Combatting extreme wealth inequality is a climate action. Shutting down the hate machines on social media is a climate action. Instituting humane immigration policy, advocating for racial and gender equality, promoting respect for laws and their enforcement, supporting a free and independent press, ridding the country of assault weapons—these are all meaningful climate actions. To survive rising temperatures, every system, whether of the natural world or of the human world, will need to be as strong and healthy as we can make it.
future  climatechange  climatecrisis  hope  war  climate 
2 days ago by msszczep
Jonathan Franzen writes about the tendency of media and politicians to describe the climate crisis with an excess of hope, and about the different decisions that become available after realizing that the climate catastrophe is unavoidable.
apocalypse  climate  change  adaptation  psychology  denial  social 
3 days ago by ivar
Illustration by Leonardo Santamaria “There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose…
from instapaper
4 days ago by mlinder
To me this isn't a question. We are past the point of no return.
climate  apocalypse  pragmatism 
5 days ago by jntolva
The struggle to rein in global carbon emissions and keep the planet from melting down has the feel of Kafka’s fiction. The goal has been clear for thirty years, and despite earnest efforts we’ve made essentially no progress toward reaching it. Today, the scientific evidence verges on irrefutable. If you’re younger than sixty, you have a good chance of witnessing the radical destabilization of life on earth—massive crop failures, apocalyptic fires, imploding economies, epic flooding, hundreds of millions of refugees fleeing regions made uninhabitable by extreme heat or permanent drought. If you’re under thirty, you’re all but guaranteed to witness it.
climate-change 
5 days ago by altoii
Illustration by Leonardo Santamaria “There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose…
from instapaper
6 days ago by danbee
“There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose characters strive for ostensibly reachable goals and, tragically or amusingly, never manage to get any closer to them. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  twitter 
6 days ago by Werderbach
Illustration by Leonardo Santamaria “There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose…
from instapaper
6 days ago by hugochisholm
What if We Stopped Pretending the Climate Apocalypse Can Be Stopped? via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2ZX7GWH
IFTTT  Instapaper 
7 days ago by craniac
All-out war on climate change made sense only as long as it was winnable. Once you accept that we’ve lost it, other kinds of action take on greater meaning. Preparing for fires and floods and refugees is a directly pertinent example. But the impending catastrophe heightens the urgency of almost any world-improving action. In times of increasing chaos, people seek protection in tribalism and armed force, rather than in the rule of law, and our best defense against this kind of dystopia is to maintain functioning democracies, functioning legal systems, functioning communities.
7 days ago by martinderm
Illustration by Leonardo Santamaria “There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose…
from instapaper
7 days ago by davejavou
Illustration by Leonardo Santamaria “There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose…
from instapaper
7 days ago by richirvine
RT : La vision de l’apocalypse climatique de l’écrivain Jonathan Franzen et l’absurde faux espoir du salut...
from twitter_favs
8 days ago by lyonelk
What if We Stopped Pretending the Climate Apocalypse Can Be Stopped? - The New Yorker
from twitter
8 days ago by basetta
RT : Regardless of what happens in the interregnum, it’s going to be interesting to come back to this essay in 20 years.
from twitter
8 days ago by ewerickson
This is the best thing I’ve ever read on climate change
climate 
8 days ago by souldoubt
What if We Stopped Pretending the Climate Apocalypse Can Be Stopped?
from twitter
8 days ago by Nomad93
If you care about the planet, and about the people and animals who live on it, there are two ways to think about this. You can keep on hoping that catastrophe is preventable, and feel ever more frustrated or enraged by the world’s inaction. Or you can accept that disaster is coming, and begin to rethink what it means to have hope.
climate 
8 days ago by dpb
The climate apocalypse is coming. To prepare for it, we need to admit that we can’t prevent it.
environment  future  articles 
9 days ago by mikael
What if We Stopped Pretending the Climate Apocalypse Can Be Stopped? via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2ZX7GWH
Instapaper 
9 days ago by alexrudy
“There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose characters strive for ostensibly reachable goals and, tragically or amusingly, never manage to get any closer to them.
9 days ago by AnthonyBaker
“There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose characters strive for ostensibly reachable goals and, tragically or amusingly, never manage to get any closer to them.
climatechange  softapocalypse 
9 days ago by josephaleo
Illustration by Leonardo Santamaria “There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose…
from instapaper
9 days ago by kerim
Illustration by Leonardo Santamaria “There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose…
from instapaper
9 days ago by Shurs