Decentralisation: the next big step for the world wide web | Technology | The Guardian


43 bookmarks. First posted by dcolanduno 9 weeks ago.


First, it is technically more difficult to build a decentralised web because everything isn’t in one place. Then there’s getting people to use it. “Right now humanity lives at Facebook,” says Mitchell Baker, chairwoman of the Mozilla Foundation. A killer app, a thing that everyone wants, could help here – but there isn’t one yet. Though that is neither surprising nor a failure given how early it still is, adds Baker. Many of the apps that do exist are clunky and difficult to use; user experience needs to improve.

The DWeb movement also needs to focus on its true advantages – the things centralised systems can’t do, says Juan Benet, founder of Protocol Labs. And one of those is speed. Because of the way the DWeb works differently from the current web, it should intrinsically be faster, but there is a long way to go on that, he says.

There are also big issues about governance that need to be ironed out, says Primavera De Filippi, who studies the legal and organisational challenges of decentralised technologies at the National Centre for Scientific Research in Paris and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. How does the decentralised web all come together when no one is in charge? And how do you make sure things don’t just become centralised again, the system repeating itself, particularly when there are companies that want to make money?

How big online companies push back also remains to be seen. “There are going to be a lot of forces for the status quo,” says Kahle. The DWeb is new and burgeoning, but it also isn’t inevitable.
conference  decentralized  democracy  freedom  future  inspiration  internet  parecon  tech  technology  video  videos  web  web2.0 
13 days ago by msszczep
Technology | The Guardian https://ift.tt/21NZQKD
9 weeks ago by mourique
The story that broke early last month that Google would again cooperate with Chinese authorities to run a censored version of its search engine, something the tech giant has neither confirmed nor denied, had ironic timing. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
9 weeks ago by archizoo
The decentralised web isn’t quite here yet. But there are apps and programs built on the decentralised model. Many are experimental but some of the more developed products include OpenBazaar (a decentralised marketplace), Graphite Docs (a Google documents alternative), Textile Photos (an Instagram-like alternative for storing, managing, and sharing photos on the DWeb), Matrix (which provides Slack and WhatsApp alternatives) and DTube (a YouTube alternative). Social network alternatives include Akasha and Diaspora. There is also a new independent experimental browser for exploring the peer-to-peer web called Beaker Browser. The Internet Archive, the nonprofit organisation that archives the web through snapshots of web pages and other media, has made a first attempt to decentralise its website by bringing together many of the technologies.
9 weeks ago by spectrevision
The story that broke early last month that Google would again cooperate with Chinese authorities to run a censored version of its search engine, something the tech giant has neither confirmed nor denied, had ironic timing. via Pocket
Pocket 
9 weeks ago by driptray
Explaining the Decentralized Web to a global audience at @: with interviews at the .
DWebSummit  from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by briantrice
The decentralised web, or DWeb, could be a chance to take control of our data back from the big tech firms. So how does it work and when will it be here?
#t#next  #techpol  #$#monopoly  !write!technologist 
9 weeks ago by lemeb
The story that broke early last month that Google would again cooperate with Chinese authorities to run a censored version of its search engine, something the tech giant has neither confirmed nor denied, had ironic timing. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
9 weeks ago by djhworld
The decentralised web, or DWeb, could be a chance to take control of our data back from the big tech firms. So how does it work and when will it be here?
9 weeks ago by joeo10
I’m convinced – where do I sign up?
The decentralised web isn’t quite here yet. But there are apps and programs built on the decentralised model. Many are experimental but some of the more developed products include OpenBazaar (a decentralised marketplace), Graphite Docs (a Google documents alternative), Textile Photos (an Instagram-like alternative for storing, managing, and sharing photos on the DWeb), Matrix (which provides Slack and WhatsApp alternatives) and DTube (a YouTube alternative). Social network alternatives include Akasha and Diaspora. There is also a new independent experimental browser for exploring the peer-to-peer web called Beaker Browser. The Internet Archive, the nonprofit organisation that archives the web through snapshots of web pages and other media, has made a first attempt to decentralise its website by bringing together many of the technologies.
internet  web  decentralized 
9 weeks ago by euler
The story that broke earlier last month that Google would again cooperate with Chinese authorities to run a censored version of its search engine, something the tech giant has neither confirmed nor denied, had ironic timing. via Pocket
pocket 
9 weeks ago by jburkunk
The story that broke earlier last month that Google would again cooperate with Chinese authorities to run a censored version of its search engine, something the tech giant has neither confirmed nor denied, had ironic timing.
Archive 
9 weeks ago by fraz87
The story that broke earlier last month that Google would again cooperate with Chinese authorities to run a censored version of its search engine, something the tech giant has neither confirmed nor denied, had ironic timing. via Pocket
culture  newsletter  tech  web 
9 weeks ago by thewavingcat
The story that broke earlier last month that Google would again cooperate with Chinese authorities to run a censored version of its search engine, something the tech giant has neither confirmed nor denied, had ironic timing. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
9 weeks ago by michimaurer
Decentralisation: the next big step for the world wide web | Technology | The Guardian
from twitter
9 weeks ago by jackysee
The decentralised web, or DWeb, could be a chance to take control of our data back from the big tech firms. So how does it work and when will it be here?
articles  internet  decentralization 
9 weeks ago by mikael
The story that broke earlier last month that Google would again cooperate with Chinese authorities to run a censored version of its search engine, something the tech giant has neither confirmed nor denied, had ironic timing.
Pocket 
9 weeks ago by apolaine