Facebook's PR feels broken


13 bookmarks. First posted by charlesarthur 17 days ago.


Ranjan here, writing about how Facebook’s communication operations feel completely broken and wondering whether the company’s rank and file are okay with…
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14 days ago by rboone
RT : Excellent essay on FB’s broken PR ...
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16 days ago by AramZS
Ranjan here, writing about how Facebook’s communication operations feel completely broken and wondering whether the company’s rank and file are okay with…
from instapaper
16 days ago by thijsniks
Ranjan here, writing about how Facebook’s communication operations feel completely broken and wondering whether the company’s rank and file are okay with…
from instapaper
17 days ago by mrtoto
to that last point, interesting piece today from
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17 days ago by charisse
to that last point, interesting piece today from
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17 days ago by andriak
Ranjan Roy:
<p>to summarize, Andrew Bosworth, longtime Facebook exec, wrote a long, reflective internal post on Facebook’s role in the 2020 election:

So was Facebook responsible for Donald Trump getting elected? I think the answer is yes, but not for the reasons anyone thinks. He didn’t get elected because of Russia or misinformation or Cambridge Analytica. He got elected because he ran the single best digital ad campaign I’ve ever seen from any advertiser. Period.

In a section that got a lot of attention, he continued:
<p>I find myself thinking of the Lord of the Rings at this moment. Specifically when Frodo offers the ring to Galadrial and she imagines using the power righteously, at first, but knows it will eventually corrupt her. As tempting as it is to use the tools available to us to change the outcome, I am confident we must never do that or we will become that which we fear.</p>


I'm not a big LOTR person, and will let Gizmodo cover the <a href="https://gizmodo.com/facebook-guy-confused-about-lord-of-the-rings-many-oth-1840862413">accuracy of his reference</a>, but how does Facebook possibly let this enter the national conversation? One of their most longtime, loyal leaders is directly saying they have the power to sway national elections. It is their decision, and their decision alone, to resist the temptation to "change the outcome"!

This is the very definition of a need for regulation. By its own admission, the company is acknowledging its unnatural power. In the memo, Boz clarifies he’s liberal in his politics, but the issue is not Facebook and its purported ties to the right. The issue is simply its size. An individual, for-profit corporation should not get to decide whether democracy will work.

To continue on the communications breakdown, Boz posted <a href="https://www.facebook.com/boz/posts/10111288357877121">an explanation</a> on Facebook, where he advertises the post as an organizational, internal call-to-debate. But while it's great to have a safe space for internal, organizational debates, it's still hugely concerning <strong>when that internal debate is whether we should all have a free and fair election in the U.S.</strong></p>


Roy and Manjan produce a consistently good newsletter (and it's free). This dissects the whole Facebook debacle particularly well.
facebook  socialwarming 
17 days ago by charlesarthur