Media Bubbles Aren’t The Biggest Reason We’re Partisans


11 bookmarks. First posted by pdiddie 15 days ago.


Maybe you call it a bubble. Maybe you call it a silo. Maybe you just call it an echo chamber. via Pocket
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11 days ago by driptray
Maybe you call it a bubble. Maybe you call it a silo. Maybe you just call it an echo chamber. But whatever metaphorical, narrow and enclosed space you prefer,…
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14 days ago by bdeskin
Maybe you call it a bubble. Maybe you call it a silo. Maybe you just call it an echo chamber. But whatever metaphorical, narrow and enclosed space you prefer,…
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14 days ago by kerim
Maybe you call it a bubble. Maybe you call it a silo. Maybe you just call it an echo chamber. But whatever metaphorical, narrow and enclosed space you prefer,…
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14 days ago by streicher
“People have a notion from hearing about [information echo chambers] that most Americans are getting news and information from a very slanted media diet,” he told me. “Empirical evidence suggests that’s not true.”

Yes, seriously. Consider, for instance, the simple math of TV ratings. There are about 122 million Americans who told the Census Bureau that they voted in 2018. The vast majority of those voters don’t watch partisan cable news. FOX News and MSNBC pull in around 3 million viewers when their top hosts are on air. In contrast, around 5 million people tune in to each of the network nightly news shows. More Americans have a centrist media diet than a slanted one. And most Americans are basically fasting.

[...]

Sure, we all do like to hear perspectives that verify what we already think we know. Who doesn’t enjoy being told that we are smarter than people we don’t like? But while lab experiments suggest that could cause us to silo ourselves, reality looks a little more nuanced. In a 2016 paper, researchers tracked a sample of 50,000 Americans who heavily consumed online news and found that their reading was overwhelmingly self-directed (rather than algorithm-selected) and mainstream centrist in orientation. And, while the use of social networks and search engines were associated with a larger partisan divide — they were also associated with people being more frequently exposed to more opinions they disagreed with.
media  electionStrategy  elections  politics 
15 days ago by sandykoe