The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can. - The New York Times


58 bookmarks. First posted by aebraddy may 2018.


Inspired by Silicon Valley’s hyper-growth, companies elsewhere are burning cash in hopes of being the next big thing.
business  economics 
june 2018 by marcosmesser
The Entire Is Now. Enjoy It While You Can.
MoviePass  Economy  from twitter
june 2018 by alvar
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by kohlmannj
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service charges, no hidden fees, just crisp $1 bills for the price of three quarters. It’ll be huge.
may 2018 by AnthonyBaker
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service charges, no hidden fees, just crisp $1 bills for the price of three quarters. It’ll be huge.
lastmac 
may 2018 by philapple
For consumers who are willing to do their research, though, this can be a golden age of deals. We can get our “Avengers: Infinity War” tickets and pecan-crusted salmon meal kits, reaping the benefits of artificially cheap goods and services while investors soak up the losses. The current crop of money-losing companies may not survive forever, but as long as someone is willing to keep funding these types of gambles, there’s no reason to stop enjoying the fruits of their optimism.

So, back to the 75 Cent Dollar Store. Are you in?
may 2018 by judytuna
“The entire economy is Movie Pass now.”

(via )
from twitter
may 2018 by wwc
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by ecandino
Inspired by Silicon Valley’s hyper-growth, companies elsewhere are burning cash in hopes of being the next big thing.
may 2018 by brianyang
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by adamlogic
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service charges, no hidden fees, just crisp $1 bills for the price of three quarters. It’ll be huge. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  nyt  technology 
may 2018 by eemorningwood
The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can.
from twitter
may 2018 by sammyrulez
> "It’s also difficult for small businesses without access to huge amounts of capital to compete with the Googles and Amazons of the world, which further distorts economic growth in favor of corporations that can afford to spend billions of dollars undercutting the competition"
quote  instapaper 
may 2018 by kaiton
“76 percent of the companies that went public last year were unprofitable on a per-share basis in the year leading up to their initial offerings”

The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can. https://t.co/Yy7C0q6Xf5

— Emrys Schoemaker (@emrys_s) May 19, 2018
IFTTT  Twitter 
may 2018 by semrys
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by louderthan10
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by johnrclark
The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can.
from twitter
may 2018 by bartmroz
The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can. - New York Times via
from twitter_favs
may 2018 by mathewi
If you’re still skeptical, I don’t blame you. It used to be that in order to survive, businesses had to sell goods or services above cost. But that model is so 20th century. The new way to make it in business is to spend big, grow fast and use Kilimanjaro-size piles of investor cash to subsidize your losses, with a plan to become profitable somewhere down the road.

The rise in unprofitable companies is partly the result of growth in the technology and biotech sectors, where companies tend to lose money for years as they spend on customer acquisition and research and development, Mr. Ritter said. But it also reflects the willingness of shareholders and deep-pocketed private investors to keep fast-growing upstarts afloat long enough to conquer a potential “winner-take-all” market. Today’s public tech companies generally earn more revenue than their dot-com era counterparts, and could find it easier to flip the profit switch once they’ve reached a sufficient size.

For consumers who are willing to do their research, though, this can be a golden age of deals. We can get our “Avengers: Infinity War” tickets and pecan-crusted salmon meal kits, reaping the benefits of artificially cheap goods and services while investors soak up the losses. The current crop of money-losing companies may not survive forever, but as long as someone is willing to keep funding these types of gambles, there’s no reason to stop enjoying the fruits of their optimism.
business  economics 
may 2018 by rianvdm
Inspired by Silicon Valley’s hyper-growth, companies elsewhere are burning cash in hopes of being the next big thing.
economics 
may 2018 by MattieTK
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by adrianhon
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by joeybaker
If you’re still skeptical, I don’t blame you. It used to be that in order to survive, businesses had to sell goods or services above cost. But that model is so 20th century. The new way to make it in business is to spend big, grow fast and use Kilimanjaro-size piles of investor cash to subsidize your losses, with a plan to become profitable somewhere down the road.

Over all, 76 percent of the companies that went public last year were unprofitable on a per-share basis in the year leading up to their initial offerings, according to data compiled by Jay Ritter, a professor at the University of Florida’s Warrington College of Business. That was the largest number since the peak of the dot-com boom in 2000, when 81 percent of newly public companies were unprofitable. Of the 15 technology companies that have gone public so far in 2018, only three had positive earnings per share in the preceding year, according to Mr. Ritter.
#$#nextcrash  #$#monopoly  #$#innov 
may 2018 by lemeb
via Pocket - The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can. - Added May 16, 2018 at 08:53PM
may 2018 by mikele
RT : Boy it's smelling like 1999 around here.
from twitter
may 2018 by hyperfekt
The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can.
from twitter
may 2018 by ichthyos
Inspired by Silicon Valley’s hyper-growth, companies elsewhere are burning cash in hopes of being the next big thing.
may 2018 by nfultz
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by yudha87
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by mjbrej
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service charges, no hidden fees, just crisp $1 bills for the price of three quarters. It’ll be huge.
Archive  ifttt  nyt  op-ed  opinion 
may 2018 by odelano
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch?

It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service charges, no hidden fees, just crisp $1 bills for the price of three quarters. It’ll be huge.

You’re probably thinking: Wait, won’t your store go out of business? Nope. I’ve got that part figured out, too. The plan is to get tons of people addicted to buying 75-cent dollars so that, in a year or two, we can jack up the price to $1.50 or $2 without losing any customers. Or maybe we’ll get so big that the Treasury Department will start selling us dollar bills at a discount. We could also collect data about our customers and sell it to the highest bidder. Honestly, we’ve got plenty of options.

If you’re still skeptical, I don’t blame you. It used to be that in order to survive, businesses had to sell goods or services above cost. But that model is so 20th century.
economics  business  netcritique  articles 
may 2018 by mikael
I’ve got a great idea for a start-up. Want to hear the pitch? It’s called the 75 Cent Dollar Store. We’re going to sell dollar bills for 75 cents — no service…
from instapaper
may 2018 by alphex
Inspired by Silicon Valley’s hyper-growth, companies elsewhere are burning cash in hopes of being the next big thing.
may 2018 by burin
The Entire Economy Is MoviePass Now. Enjoy It While You Can. via
from twitter
may 2018 by cianw
I like this analogy
from twitter
may 2018 by acdlite
Uber ($4.5 billion)
Snapchat ($3.4 billion)
Spotify ($1.5 billion)
unicorns  losers 
may 2018 by dotcoma
via NYT > Home Page https://nyti.ms/2IfI5AI
NEWS 
may 2018 by aebraddy