Uber’s Secret Tool for Keeping the Cops in the Dark - Bloomberg


51 bookmarks. First posted by Buffalo_Goku january 2018.


At least two dozen times, the San Francisco headquarters locked down equipment in foreign offices to shield files from police raids.
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january 2018 by vanadium
In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc. ’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had…
from instapaper
january 2018 by urbansheep
Weekly reminder to avoid Uber like the plague
january 2018 by kevinspencer
Like managers at Uber’s hundreds of offices abroad, they’d been trained to page a number that alerted specially trained staff at company headquarters in San Francisco. When the call came in, staffers quickly remotely logged off every computer in the Montreal office, making it practically impossible for the authorities to retrieve the company records they’d obtained a warrant to collect. The investigators left without any evidence.
january 2018 by spectrevision
Most tech companies don’t expect police to regularly raid their offices, but Uber isn’t most companies. The ride-hailing startup’s reputation for flouting local labor laws and taxi rules has made it a favorite target for law enforcement agencies around the world. That’s where this remote system, called Ripley, comes in. From spring 2015 until late 2016, Uber routinely used Ripley to thwart police raids in foreign countries, say three people with knowledge of the system. Allusions to its nature can be found in a smattering of court filings, but its details, scope, and origin haven’t been previously reported.
Uber  legal  ethics  taxation  review  critique  Bloomberg  2018 
january 2018 by inspiral
In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc. ’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had…
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january 2018 by wahoo5
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january 2018 by joewiz
In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc. ’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had…
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january 2018 by edmadrid
In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc. ’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had…
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january 2018 by rgl7194
Uber’s Secret Tool for Keeping the Cops in the Dark – Feedbin Starred Entries for toph.allen@gmail.com
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january 2018 by toph
Uber’s Secret Tool for Keeping the Cops in the Dark via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2miWqSJ
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january 2018 by heff100
In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc. ’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had…
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january 2018 by bkerr
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january 2018 by stinkingpig
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At this point Uber should best be described not as a business or startup, but as a racket, a criminal enterprise.

 ★ 
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january 2018 by josephschmitt
At this point Uber should best be described not as a business or startup, but as a racket, a criminal enterprise.

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january 2018 by rufous
RT : Even for Uber, this is Bonkers. It's a step beyond Greyball. by
from twitter
january 2018 by wolever
Bloomberg sources: in 2015-2016 Uber used “Ripley” tool to remotely shut down the company's devices and shield files and data from police raids in foreign countries
january 2018 by joeo10
RT : Uber evidence destruction tool: Ripley, an entire product built to hide evidence from law enforcement
from twitter
january 2018 by dunstan
RT : "Most tech companies don’t expect police to regularly raid their offices, but Uber isn't most companies."
from twitter
january 2018 by joeybaker
The Uber HQ team overseeing Ripley could remotely change passwords and otherwise lock up data on company-owned smartphones, laptops, and desktops as well as shut down the devices. This routine was initially called the unexpected visitor protocol.
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january 2018 by libbymiller
In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc. ’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had…
from instapaper
january 2018 by kohlmannj
Favorite tweet:

gentle reminder to tech companies that you should always go with extremely boring codenames if you dont want your programs perceived as insane nefarious shit (even if they are)https://t.co/l6NdO6G68Y http://pic.twitter.com/CXdK1HdZY2

— ಠ_ಠ (@MikeIsaac) January 12, 2018
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january 2018 by chetan
Olivia Zaleski and Eric Newcomer:
<p>In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc.’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had violated tax laws and had a warrant to collect evidence. Managers on-site knew what to do, say people with knowledge of the event.

Like managers at Uber’s hundreds of offices abroad, they’d been trained to page a number that alerted specially trained staff at company headquarters in San Francisco. When the call came in, staffers quickly remotely logged off every computer in the Montreal office, making it practically impossible for the authorities to retrieve the company records they’d obtained a warrant to collect. The investigators left without any evidence.

Most tech companies don’t expect police to regularly raid their offices, but Uber isn’t most companies.</p>


The tool is called Ripley:
<p>From spring 2015 until late 2016, Uber routinely used Ripley to thwart police raids in foreign countries, say three people with knowledge of the system. Allusions to its nature can be found in a smattering of court filings, but its details, scope, and origin haven’t been previously reported.

The Uber HQ team overseeing Ripley could remotely change passwords and otherwise lock up data on company-owned smartphones, laptops, and desktops as well as shut down the devices. This routine was initially called the unexpected visitor protocol.</p>


In <a href="https://twitter.com/matthewstoller/status/951491737540808704">the words of Matt Stoller</a>: "Uber often looks like a criminal conspiracy that happens to run a ride-sharing service."
uber  legal  ripley 
january 2018 by charlesarthur
Ripley, an entire product built to hide evidence from law enforcement
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january 2018 by nelson
full article
slashdot  2018 
january 2018 by PCjabber
Uber is an ethical cesspool.

Also, it is Thursday.
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january 2018 by aslakr
In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc. ’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had…
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january 2018 by yudha87
In May 2015 about 10 investigators for the Quebec tax authority burst into Uber Technologies Inc.’s office in Montreal. The authorities believed Uber had violated tax laws and had a warrant to collect evidence. Managers on-site knew what to do, say people with knowledge of the event. via Pocket
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january 2018 by Buffalo_Goku