The long, incredibly tortuous, and fascinating process of creating a Chinese font — Quartz


27 bookmarks. First posted by dirtystylus may 2017.


Surprisingly interesting...
design  font  China 
may 2018 by traggett
The long, incredibly tortuous, and fascinating process of creating a Chinese font — Quartz
from twitter
april 2018 by jackysee
This is all about “balance,” one of the main principles of Chinese calligraphy. Arphic actually has software that automates collecting the necessary components for a character, but that alone is never enough. A simple stroke may fit nicely in one character but upset the balance of another, maybe by being too thick when there are many thin strokes, or vice versa. A stroke or radical’s placement could make the character look crowded, or loose, depending on the strokes around it, and need to be adjusted accordingly. These are the kinds of things happening with 言 (yan, speech) above.

A Chinese reader would be put off by such mistakes as readily as an English reader would be by a lowercase “l” that looks too much like a “1.” Here an Arphic edit suggests aligning the bottom of the character 蹉 with its top part, writing in red ink, “bottom shifted right.” The character, as it happens, is cuo, and means “error.”

This means that, as Chinese typeface designers continue to add to the set of representative characters, they find cases where the stroke and radical designs they were once quite proud of do not hold up to the range of contexts they need to be used in. These assumptions must be constantly challenged and revised.
typography  china  design 
april 2018 by madamim
The story of Chinese characters begins with, of all things, turtle bellies. The kings of the Shang Dynasty—which ruled from the 16th to the 11th centuries…
from instapaper
april 2018 by jdelStrother
- The long, incredibly tortuous, and fascinating process of creating a Chinese font.
from twitter_favs
april 2018 by adamamyl
The story of Chinese characters begins with, of all things, turtle bellies. The kings of the Shang Dynasty—which ruled from the 16th to the 11th centuries…
from instapaper
april 2018 by wenxin
The long, tortuous and fascinating process of creating a Chinese font
from twitter
april 2018 by gpessia
"This has been possible for a number of years, but Chinese always posed a particular problem: with so many glyphs, the fonts require huge downloads for users that have not visited the site before, putting a strain on bandwidth both for user and provider. (A Chinese font can run up to 6 or 7 megabytes for a single style and weight. Compare that to PT Serif—Quartz’s body font, which covers over 100 Latin languages—which is just 1.4 megabytes for four styles.) Now Chinese webfont providers cleverly scan through a webpage’s text to identify which glyphs are required, and send only those to the user instead of all 13,000-plus."
design  typography  awesome  best-of  china 
april 2018 by tjwds
The story of Chinese characters begins with, of all things, turtle bellies. The kings of the Shang Dynasty—which ruled from the 16th to the 11th centuries…
from instapaper
april 2018 by anglepoised
The story of Chinese characters begins with, of all things, turtle bellies. The kings of the Shang Dynasty—which ruled from the 16th to the 11th centuries…
from instapaper
april 2018 by stevenbedrick