The Secret Language of Ships | Hakai Magazine


47 bookmarks. First posted by wn april 2018.


The Secret Language of Ships
Signs and symbols on the sides of ships tell stories about an industry few outsiders understand.
Authored by Text by Erin Van Rheenen
Photos by David Webster Smith

IMO, load lines, Samuel Plimsoll
nautical 
7 weeks ago by asfaltics
The Secret Language of Ships:
from twitter
9 weeks ago by hockendougal
Article body copy Approaching the container ship in San Francisco Bay, the tugboat looks like a pit bull puppy chasing an eighteen-wheeler. When the vessels are…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by kslimbs
The Secret Language of Ships | Hakai Magazine https://ift.tt/2qlr8fV
IFTTT  Instapaper 
april 2018 by ldodds
Article body copy Approaching the container ship in San Francisco Bay, the tugboat looks like a pit bull puppy chasing an eighteen-wheeler. When the vessels are…
from instapaper
april 2018 by rdr
The Secret Language of Ships
from twitter
april 2018 by kejadlen
Quite interesting - The Secret Language of Ships
from twitter
april 2018 by puja
Approaching the container ship in San Francisco Bay, the tugboat looks like a pit bull puppy chasing an eighteen-wheeler. When the vessels are an arm’s length apart, the ship’s mate throws down a line. Now leashed to the ship, the tug can push and pull it around the bay. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  browser 
april 2018 by minifig
Article body copy Approaching the container ship in San Francisco Bay, the tugboat looks like a pit bull puppy chasing an eighteen-wheeler. When the vessels are…
from instapaper
april 2018 by peterwhelan
Ships have a secret language. I now energised to visit a dock again...
design  from twitter_favs
april 2018 by qdot
Article body copy Approaching the container ship in San Francisco Bay, the tugboat looks like a pit bull puppy chasing an eighteen-wheeler. When the vessels are…
from instapaper
april 2018 by johnrclark
The Secret Language of Ships | Signs and symbols on the sides of ships tell stories few outsiders understand.
from twitter_favs
april 2018 by rwentechaney
Not many people have an opportunity to get this close to a container ship. Those who do may see icons that impart important information. For example, those black brackets to the right of the company name indicate where the tugboat is supposed to push.
language  ships  transport  sea  knowledge  shipping 
april 2018 by sspela
"Tugboat crews routinely encounter what few of us will ever see. They easily read a vessel’s size, shape, function, and features, while deciphering at a glance the mysterious numbers, letters, and symbols on a ship’s hull. To non-mariners, the markings look like hieroglyphs. For those in the know, they speak volumes about a particular ship and also about the shipping industry."
ships  symbols 
april 2018 by davewsmith
Signs and symbols on the sides of ships tell stories about an industry few outsiders understand.
engineering 
april 2018 by chris.leaman
On what the various symbols on the side of ships mean. Plus some details of tug boats and pilots.
shipping  design 
april 2018 by mr_stru
Signs and symbols on the sides of ships tell stories about an industry few outsiders understand.
maritime  reference  language 
april 2018 by RedWolf
Notations used by tugs, dockworkers
via:metafilter  shipping  containers 
april 2018 by nelson
The Secret Language of Ships
from twitter_favs
april 2018 by burritojustice
What markings and other things on the outside of ships mean.
design  engineering  toread  reference 
april 2018 by moose
How to decode a Plimsoll Line, and other markings on the hulls of big ships. The original 19C Plimsoll Line was a circle with a horizontal line through it. If the line sank below sea-level, the ship was overloaded. The marks and letters to the right of the circle indicate maximum loads under different climatic conditions: W marks the maximum load in winter temperate seawater, S in summer temperate seawater, T in tropical seawater, F in fresh water, and TF in tropical fresh water, like that of the Amazon River
from instapaper
april 2018 by petulantskeptic
Tugboat crews routinely encounter what few of us will ever see. They easily read a vessel’s size, shape, function, and features, while deciphering at a glance the mysterious numbers, letters, and symbols on a ship’s hull. To non-mariners, the markings look like hieroglyphs. For those in the know, they speak volumes about a particular ship and also about the shipping industry.
shipping  IMO  glyphs  marks  tranport  annotation 
april 2018 by zzkt
This is beautiful and a must-read for transport nerds: the secret language of ships https://t.co/GEKeljHw35

— 𝕄𝕚𝕜𝕖 𝕃𝕪𝕟𝕔𝕙 (@bombinans) April 13, 2018
twitter 
april 2018 by mikelynch