How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met


255 bookmarks. First posted by lemonodor november 2017.


In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
april 2018 by louderthan10
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
april 2018 by mrmanner
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
april 2018 by robw
Behind the Facebook profile you’ve built for yourself is another one, a shadow profile, built from the inboxes and smartphones of other Facebook users. Contact information you’ve never given the network gets associated with your account, making it easier for Facebook to more completely map your social connections.
facebook  surveillance  privacy  security  social 
february 2018 by spaceninja
How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met via
from twitter
february 2018 by eliotwhite
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
january 2018 by jolilius
Behind the Facebook profile you’ve built for yourself is another one, a shadow profile, built from the inboxes and smartphones of other Facebook users. Contact information you’ve never given the network gets associated with your account, making it easier for Facebook to more completely map your social connections.
privacy  infosec  facebook  socialmedia  surveillance 
december 2017 by campylobacter
RT : How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met
from twitter
november 2017 by mikebutcher
How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met
from twitter
november 2017 by beeston
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
november 2017 by davejavou
Tech twitter already knows this but normal people don’t seem to: How Facebook figures out everyone you’ve ever met.
november 2017 by slee2004
"It’s what the sociologist danah boyd calls “networked privacy”: All the people who know you and who choose to share their contacts with Facebook are making it easier for Facebook to make connections you may not want it to make—say if you’re in a profession like law, medicine, social work, or even journalism, where you might not want to be connected to people you encounter at work, because of what it could reveal about them or you, or because you may not have had a friendly encounter with them.

Imagine the challenge for people trying to maintain two different identities, such as sex workers or undercover investigators. Not only do you have to keep those identities apart like a security professional, you have to make sure that no one else links them either. If just one person you know has contact information for both identities and gives Facebook access to it, your worlds collide. Bruce Wayne and Clark Kent would be screwed."
facebook  privacy  data  mining 
november 2017 by elrob
Shadow contact information has been a known feature of Facebook for a few years now. But most users remain unaware of its reach and power. Because shadow-profile connections happen inside Facebook’s algorithmic black box, people can’t see how deep the data-mining of their lives truly is, until an uncanny recommendation pops up.
facebook  privacy  security  surveillance 
november 2017 by Gwendoux
Interesting companion to the recent Reply All episode:

https://gimletmedia.com/episode/109-facebook-spying/
facebook  replyall 
november 2017 by lsouzek
QUOTE Behind the Facebook profile you’ve built for yourself is another one, a shadow profile, built from the inboxes and smartphones of other Facebook users. Contact information you’ve never given the network gets associated with your account, making it easier for Facebook to more completely map your social connections.
AI 
november 2017 by fjk4
QUOTE Behind the Facebook profile you’ve built for yourself is another one, a shadow profile, built from the inboxes and smartphones of other Facebook users. Contact information you’ve never given the network gets associated with your account, making it easier for Facebook to more completely map your social connections.
AI 
november 2017 by lafgrp
Ever wonder how Facebook is so good at recommending people you may know? It is a little scary.
from twitter
november 2017 by etucker
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
november 2017 by femmebot
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and they say, “Oh, I have a grandparent in Sarasota,” and they tell you where they live and their name, and you may or may not recognize them.
You might assume Facebook’s friend recommendations would work the same way: You tell the social network who you are, and it tells you who you might know in the online world. But Facebook’s machinery operates on a scale far beyond normal human interactions. And the results of its People You May Know algorithm are anything but obvious. In the months I’ve been writing about PYMK, as Facebook calls it, I’ve heard more than a hundred bewildering anecdotes...
facebook  security  privacy  spying  tracking 
november 2017 by rgl7194
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
november 2017 by paryshnikov
"Behind the Facebook profile you’ve built for yourself is another one, a shadow profile, built from the inboxes and smartphones of other Facebook users. Contact information you’ve never given the network gets associated with your account, making it easier for Facebook to more completely map your social connections.""If you agree to share your contacts, every piece of contact data you possess will go to Facebook, and the network will then use it to try to search for connections between everyone you know, no matter how slightly—and you won’t see it happen.""When Steinfeld wrote “a friend or someone you might know,” he meant anyone—any person who might at some point have labeled your phone number or email or address in their own contacts. A one-night stand from 2008, a person you got a couch from on Craiglist in 2010, a landlord from 2013: If they ever put you in their phone, or you put them in yours, Facebook could log the connection if either party were to upload their contacts.

That accumulation of contact data from hundreds of people means that Facebook probably knows every address you’ve ever lived at, every email address you’ve ever used, every landline and cell phone number you’ve ever been associated with, all of your nicknames, any social network profiles associated with you, all your former instant message accounts, and anything else someone might have added about you to their phone book.""This is how a psychiatrist’s patients were recommended to one another and may be why a man had his secret biological daughter recommended to him. (He and she would have her parents’ contact information in common.) And it may explain why a non-Facebook user had his ex-wife recommended to his girlfriend. Facebook doesn’t keep profiles for non-users, but it does use their contact information to connect people.""“Mobile phone numbers are even better than social security numbers for identifying people,” said security technologist Bruce Schneier by email. “People give them out all the time, and they’re strongly linked to identity.”"
Facebook  surveillance  algorithms  networked-privacy 
november 2017 by jschneider
How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met
from twitter
november 2017 by joshpuetz
Creepy... How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met via
from twitter
november 2017 by waynewilliamberninger
How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met // This is so incredibly creepy.
from twitter
november 2017 by Cmacmurchy
"When Steinfeld wrote 'a friend or someone you might know', he meant anyone—any person who might at some point have labeled your phone number or email or address in their own contacts. A one-night stand from 2008, a person you got a couch from on Craiglist in 2010, a landlord from 2013: If they ever put you in their phone, or you put them in yours, Facebook could log the connection if either party were to upload their contacts. That accumulation of contact data from hundreds of people means that Facebook probably knows every address you’ve ever lived at, every email address you’ve ever used, every landline and cell phone number you’ve ever been associated with, all of your nicknames, any social network profiles associated with you, all your former instant message accounts, and anything else someone might have added about you to their phone book."
a:Kashmir-Hill★  p:Gizmodo★  d:2017.11.07  w:2500  Facebook  privacy  mobile  from twitter
november 2017 by bankbryan
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
november 2017 by johnke
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and they say, “Oh, I have a grandparent in Sarasota,” and they tell you where they live and their name, and you may or may not recognize them.
privacy 
november 2017 by jellis
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
november 2017 by kabads
RT : Facebook’s shadow profiles are shady as fuck. What a disgusting invasion of privacy to juice “engagement”. Yuck.
from twitter
november 2017 by davidflo
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
november 2017 by siggiarni
That accumulation of contact data from hundreds of people means that Facebook probably knows every address you’ve ever lived at, every email address you’ve ever used, every landline and cell phone number you’ve ever been associated with, all of your nicknames, any social network profiles associated with you, all your former instant message accounts, and anything else someone might have added about you to their phone book.

As far as Facebook is concerned, none of that even counts as your own information. It belongs to the users who’ve uploaded it, and they’re the only ones with any control over it.

Shadow profile data powers Facebook’s effort to connect as many people as possible, in as many ways as possible. The company’s ability to perceive the threads connecting its billion-plus users around the globe led it to announce last year that it’s not six degrees that separate one person from another—it’s just three and a half.
facebook  privacy 
november 2017 by W6AZ
John Gruber:
https://daringfireball.net/linked/2017/11/14/hill-facebook

“Excellent investigation by Kashmir Hill, writing for Gizmodo, on Facebook’s creepy “People You May Know” system:

[quote]
In the months I’ve been writing about PYMK, as Facebook calls it, I’ve heard more than a hundred bewildering anecdotes:

A man who years ago donated sperm to a couple, secretly, so they could have a child — only to have Facebook recommend the child as a person he should know. He still knows the couple but is not friends with them on Facebook.

A social worker whose client called her by her nickname on their second visit, because she’d shown up in his People You May Know, despite their not having exchanged contact information.

A woman whose father left her family when she was six years old — and saw his then-mistress suggested to her as a Facebook friend 40 years later.

An attorney who wrote: “I deleted Facebook after it recommended as PYMK a man who was defense counsel on one of my cases. We had only communicated through my work email, which is not connected to my Facebook, which convinced me Facebook was scanning my work email.”
[/quote]

Even if, like me, you’ve never even signed up for Facebook, they almost certainly have a detailed profile of you.”
privacy  articles  surveillance  via_df 
november 2017 by metaproof
In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and…
from instapaper
november 2017 by jonstieg
Reminder, Facebook is still as creepy and untrustworthy as ever.
from twitter_favs
november 2017 by mdrovdahl
RT : Facebook’s shadow profiles are shady as fuck. What a disgusting invasion of privacy to juice “engagement”. Yuck.
from twitter
november 2017 by jukkan