What the Rich Won’t Tell You - The New York Times


50 bookmarks. First posted by archizoo 11 weeks ago.


September 08, 2017 at 08:37PM via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
14 days ago by zalary
What the Rich Won’t Tell You
artikel  readitlater 
18 days ago by webhamsterz
What the Rich Won’t Tell You
from twitter
9 weeks ago by kejadlen
Matt Chase Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by zsoltika
Matt Chase Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by scottsin
Matt Chase Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by adamthelibrarian
By not mentioning money, my interviewees follow a seemingly neutral social norm that frowns on such talk. But this norm is one of the ways in which privileged people can obscure both their advantages and their conflicts about these advantages.

And, as they try to be “normal,” these wealthy and affluent people deflect the stigma of wealth. If they can see themselves as hard workers and reasonable consumers, they can belong symbolically to the broad and legitimate American “middle,” while remaining materially at the top.

These efforts respond to widespread judgments of the individual behaviors of wealthy people as morally meritorious or not. Yet what’s crucial to see is that such judgments distract us from any possibility of thinking about redistribution. When we evaluate people’s moral worth on the basis of where and how they live and work, we reinforce the idea that what matters is what people do, not what they have. With every such judgment, we reproduce a system in which being astronomically wealthy is acceptable as long as wealthy people are morally good.

Calls from liberal and left social critics for advantaged people to recognize their privilege also underscore this emphasis on individual identities. For individual people to admit that they are privileged is not necessarily going to change an unequal system of accumulation and distribution of resources.

Instead, we should talk not about the moral worth of individuals but about the moral worth of particular social arrangements. Is the society we want one in which it is acceptable for some people to have tens of millions or billions of dollars as long as they are hardworking, generous, not materialistic and down to earth? Or should there be some other moral rubric, that would strive for a society in which such high levels of inequality were morally unacceptable, regardless of how nice or moderate its beneficiaries are?
class 
10 weeks ago by celine

We often imagine that the wealthy are unconflicted about their advantages and in fact eager to display them. Since the economist Thorstein Veblen coined the term conspicuous consumption more than a century ago, the rich have typically been represented as competing for status by showing off their wealth.

Yet we believe that wealthy people seek visibility because those we see are, by definition, visible. In contrast, the people I spoke with expressed a deep ambivalence about identifying as affluent. Rather than brag about their money or show it off, they kept quiet about their advantages. They described themselves as normal people who worked hard and spent prudently, distancing themselves from common stereotypes of the wealthy as ostentatious, selfish, snobby and entitled. Ultimately, their accounts illuminate a moral stigma of privilege.

American culture has long been marked by questions about the moral caliber of wealthy people. Capitalist entrepreneurs are often celebrated, but they are also represented as greedy and ruthless. Inheritors of fortunes, especially women, are portrayed as glamorous, but also as self-indulgent.
rich  usa  mentality  society  inegality  book  money  from instapaper
10 weeks ago by aries1988
Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were thinking about where to buy a second home and whether their young children should go to private school. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
10 weeks ago by leolobato
What the Rich Won’t Tell You
from twitter
10 weeks ago by schmidjon
“The choices that I have are obscene. Six-dollar bread is obscene.”

MY ROSEMARY OLIVE OIL BREAD IS $5 A LOAF THANK YOU VERY MUCH!

When I asked one very wealthy stay-at-home mother what her family’s assets were, she was taken aback. “No one’s ever asked me that, honestly,” she said. “No one asks that question. It’s up there with, like, ‘Do you masturbate?’ ”

LOL AS I LIKE TO SAY, IT'S THE LAST TABOO
food 
10 weeks ago by maoxian
Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were thinking about where to buy a second home and whether their young children should go to private school. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
10 weeks ago by obas818
Matt Chase Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by jesseatkinson
What the Rich Won't Tell You
from twitter_favs
10 weeks ago by adz
What the Rich Won't Tell You
from twitter_favs
10 weeks ago by demon386
“There’s nobody who knows how much we spend. You’re the only person I ever said those numbers to out loud.”
10 weeks ago by jokela
via Pocket - What the Rich Won’t Tell You - Added September 08, 2017 at 07:55AM
10 weeks ago by steinmanal
Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by alphex
“There’s nobody who knows how much we spend. You’re the only person I ever said those numbers to out loud.”
nyc 
10 weeks ago by my-flow
A great read on how rich Americans' embarrassment at being rich upholds and silences inequality
from twitter_favs
10 weeks ago by anneheathen
NYT: What the Rich Won’t Tell You https://t.co/mXcrhJh0mq
via:packrati.us 
11 weeks ago by bytebot
RT : Fascinating piece. This is how economic inequality is hidden, justified and maintained in American life.
from twitter_favs
11 weeks ago by kohlmannj
Rachel Sherman/The New York Times, Sept. 8, 2017.
wealth 
11 weeks ago by markcoddington
Matt Chase Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They…
from instapaper
11 weeks ago by stevenbedrick
RT : rich people should be taxed at higher rates for their own mental health
from twitter
11 weeks ago by pgroce
Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were thinking about where to buy a second home and whether their young children should go to private school. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  instapaper 
11 weeks ago by drewcaldwell
“the nanny is no doubt aware of the class gap whether or not she knows the price of her employer’s bread.”
from twitter
11 weeks ago by bdeskin
RT : rich people should be taxed at higher rates for their own mental health
from twitter_favs
11 weeks ago by exlibris
What the Rich Won’t Tell You via
from twitter
11 weeks ago by Reneelloyd
Interesting article on how the rich hide their wealth to avoid the discomfort of inequality. Read the comments though and it's 90% people asking for handouts from the rich.

-----

Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were thinking about where to buy a second home and whether their young children should go to private school. Then she made a confession: She took the price tags off her clothes so that her nanny would not see them. “I take the label off our six-dollar bread,” she said.

She did this, she explained, because she was uncomfortable with the inequality between herself and her nanny, a Latina immigrant. She had a household income of $250,000 and inherited wealth of several million dollars. Relative to the nanny, she told me, “The choices that I have are obscene. Six-dollar bread is obscene.”

An interior designer I spoke with told me his wealthy clients also hid prices, saying that expensive furniture and other items arrive at their houses “with big price tags on them” that “have to be removed, or Sharpied over, so the housekeepers and staff don’t see them.”
finance  interesting 
11 weeks ago by gdubz
rich people should be taxed at higher rates for their own mental health
from twitter_favs
11 weeks ago by axelav
rich people should be taxed at higher rates for their own mental health
from twitter_favs
11 weeks ago by girma
rich people should be taxed at higher rates for their own mental health
from twitter_favs
11 weeks ago by marks
•Fascinating• portrait of how the wealthy perceive themselves. Nuanced, sympathetic, troubling, and hopeful.
from twitter
11 weeks ago by pcantrell
RT : On socioeconomic class: "[the wealthy] must appear worthy of privilege for their privilege to be seen as legitimate"
from twitter
11 weeks ago by AramZS
Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were thinking about where to buy a second home and whether their young children should go to private school. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
11 weeks ago by k2theiely
Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were thinking about where to buy a second home and whether their young children should go to private school. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
11 weeks ago by archizoo