From design patterns to category theory


23 bookmarks. First posted by blebo 8 days ago.


Understanding source code #
As I explain in my Humane Code video, you can't program without abstractions. To summarise, in the words of Robert C. Martin

"Abstraction is the elimination of the irrelevant and the amplification of the essential"
With such abstractions, source code becomes easier to understand. Like everything else, there's no silver bullet, but good coding abstractions can save you much grief, and make it easier to understand big and complex code bases.
Not only can a good abstraction shield you from having to understand all the details in a big system, but if you're familiar with the abstraction, you may be able to quickly get up to speed.

While the above definition is great for identifying a good abstraction, it doesn't tell you how to create one.

Design patterns #
Design Patterns explains that a design pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem. As I interpret the original intent of the Gang of Four, the book was an attempt to collect and abstract solutions that were repeatedly observed 'in the wild'. The design patterns in the book are descriptive, not prescriptive.

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Writers before me have celebrated the power of mathematical abstraction in programming. For instance, in Domain-Driven Design Eric Evans discusses how Closure of Operations leads to object models reminiscent of arithmetic. If you can design Value Objects in such a way that you can somehow 'add' them together, you have an intuitive and powerful abstraction.

Notice that there's more than one way to combine numbers. You can add them together, but you can also multiply them. Could there be a common abstraction for that? What about objects that can somehow be combined, even if they aren't 'number-like'? The generalisation of such operations is a branch of mathematics called category theory, and it has turned out to be productive when applied to functional programming. Haskell is the most prominent example.

By an interesting coincidence, the 'things' in category theory are called objects, and while they aren't objects in the sense that we think of in object-oriented design, there is some equivalence. Category theory concerns itself with how objects map to other objects. A functional programmer would interpret such morphisms as functions, but in a sense, you can also think of them as well-defined behaviour that's associated with data.
Patterns  mathematics  model 
7 days ago by janpeuker
How do you design good abstractions? By using abstractions that already exist.
programming  categorytheory 
7 days ago by okeefe77
How do you design good abstractions? By using abstractions that already exist.
8 days ago by rawland
From design patterns to category theory
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8 days ago by jackysee
From Design Patterns to Category Theory
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8 days ago by rukku
From Design Patterns to Category Theory
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8 days ago by jacobin