BBC - Capital - The compelling case for working a lot less


36 bookmarks. First posted by kamal 9 days ago.


When I moved to Rome from Washington, DC, one sight struck me more than any ancient column or grand basilica: people doing nothing. I’d frequently glimpse old…
from instapaper
3 days ago by zsoltika
"One meta-analysis found that long working hours increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 40% – almost as much as smoking (50%). Another found that people who worked long hours had a significantly higher risk of stroke, while people who worked more than 11 hours a day were almost 2.5 times more likely to have a major depressive episode than those who worked seven to eight."
mind  health  career 
6 days ago by richtbreak
Mastering 'active rest' is far harder than it looks, but there are good reasons why we should keep working at it
culture  work  capital  career  health  creativity  productivity 
6 days ago by vloux
File under: Innovation Requires Waste.
Of course, ever since Grand Tourists began penning their observations in the seventeenth century, outsiders have stereotyped the idea of Italian ‘indolence’. And it isn’t the whole story. The same friends who headed home on their scooters for a leisurely lunch often returned to the office to work until 8pm.

Researchers are learning that it doesn’t just mean that the work we produce at the end of a 14-hour day is of worse quality than when we’re fresh. This pattern of working also undermines our creativity and our cognition. Over time, it can make us feel physically sick – and even, ironically, as if we have no purpose.

This surprised me.

Holidays also can literally pay off. One study of more than 5,000 full-time American workers found that people who took fewer than 10 of their paid holiday days a year had a little more than a one-in-three chance of getting a pay rise or a bonus over three years. People who took more than 10 days? A two in three chance.

On the effects of not letting your mind rest, and not activating your brain's Default Mode Network.

“We’re just doing things without making meaning out of it a lot of the time,” Immordino-Yang says. “When you don’t have the ability to embed your actions into a broader cause, they feel purposeless over time, and empty, and not connected to your broader sense of self. And we know that not having a purpose over time is connected to not having optimal psychological and physiological health.”
creativity  health  career  innovation 
6 days ago by jefframnani
When I moved to Rome from Washington, DC, one sight struck me more than any ancient column or grand basilica: people doing nothing. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
7 days ago by cijanzen
When I moved to Rome from Washington, DC, one sight struck me more than any ancient column or grand basilica: people doing nothing.
IFTTT  Pocket 
8 days ago by serkef
Mastering 'active rest' is far harder than it looks, but there are good reasons why we should keep working at it
work  productivity  Health  creativity 
9 days ago by basemaly
The compelling case for working less
from twitter_favs
9 days ago by rukku
RT : The compelling case for working less ()
from twitter
9 days ago by benny