'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia | Technology | The Guardian


237 bookmarks. First posted by dcolanduno 10 weeks ago.


Distraction life social media
distraction  focus  attention 
3 days ago by mikemike
There is growing concern that as well as addicting users, technology is contributing toward so-called “continuous partial attention”, severely limiting people’s ability to focus, and possibly lowering IQ. One recent study showed that the mere presence of smartphones damages cognitive capacity – even when the device is turned off. “Everyone is distracted,” Rosenstein says. “All of the time.”
attention  design  ethics  facebook  technology  blog 
14 days ago by rianvdm
Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough.
IFTTT  Pocket 
4 weeks ago by designerbrent
All of it, he says, is reward-based behaviour that activates the brain’s dopamine pathways. He sometimes finds himself clicking on the red icons beside his apps “to make them go away”, but is conflicted about the ethics of exploiting people’s psychological vulnerabilities. “It is not inherently evil to bring people back to your product,” he says. “It’s capitalism.”
4 weeks ago by spectrevision
'Everyone is distracted, all of the time" 📱
from twitter_favs
5 weeks ago by mdrovdahl
Your cheery long read for the day: 'the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia'
from twitter
5 weeks ago by miaridge
“Is it OK to shut off my phone after work? Is it OK if I don’t get back to you? Is it OK not to ‘like’ everything?”
from twitter_favs
5 weeks ago by briantrice
discomfort was compounded during a moment at work, when he glanced at one of Google’s dashboards, a multicoloured display showing how much of people’s attention the company had commandeered for advertisers. “I realised: this is literally a million people that we’ve sort of nudged or persuaded to do this thing that they weren’t going to otherwise do,” he recalls.

He embarked on several years of independent research, much of it conducted while working part-time at Google. About 18 months in, he saw the Google memo circulated by Harris and the pair became allies, struggling to bring about change from within.

It is not inherently evil to bring people back to your product. It’s capitalism
Chris Marcellino, former Apple engineer
Williams and Harris left Google around the same time, and co-founded an advocacy group, Time Well Spent, that seeks to build public momentum for a change in the way big tech companies think about design. Williams finds it hard to comprehend why this issue is not “on the front page of every newspaper every day.
design  psychology  visualization 
6 weeks ago by janpeuker
Read this and tweet at at anybody that doesn’t understand why Russian disinformation war is a huge deal.
from twitter_favs
6 weeks ago by mathewi
Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough.
6 weeks ago by AnthonyBaker
Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
6 weeks ago by djhworld
"It all began in 2013, when he was working as a product manager at Google, and circulated a thought-provoking memo, A Call To Minimise Distraction & Respect Users’ Attention, to 10 close colleagues. It struck a chord, spreading to some 5,000 Google employees, including senior executives who rewarded Harris with an impressive-sounding new job: he was to be Google’s in-house design ethicist and product philosopher.

Looking back, Harris sees that he was promoted into a marginal role. “I didn’t have a social support structure at all,” he says. Still, he adds: “I got to sit in a corner and think and read and understand.”"
design  ethics  technology  attention  facebook  people  addiction  communication  software  internet  advertising 
7 weeks ago by ssam
'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia | Technology | The Guardian
from twitter
7 weeks ago by matt.grieser
RT : 'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia
from twitter
7 weeks ago by avesse
Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough.
#productivity  #tech 
7 weeks ago by lividhedgehog
Yuuuuup.

“Drawing a straight line between addiction to social media and political earthquakes like Brexit and the rise of Donald Trump, they contend that digital forces have completely upended the political system and, left unchecked, could even render democracy as we know it obsolete.”

###

“It is revealing that many of these younger technologists are weaning themselves off their own products, sending their children to elite Silicon Valley schools where iPhones, iPads and even laptops are banned. They appear to be abiding by a Biggie Smalls lyric from their own youth about the perils of dealing crack cocaine: never get high on your own supply.”

###

“It’s this that explains how the pull-to-refresh mechanism, whereby users swipe down, pause and wait to see what content appears, rapidly became one of the most addictive and ubiquitous design features in modern technology. “Each time you’re swiping down, it’s like a slot machine,” Harris says. “You don’t know what’s coming next. Sometimes it’s a beautiful photo. Sometimes it’s just an ad.””

###

“All of which has left Brichter, who has put his design work on the backburner while he focuses on building a house in New Jersey, questioning his legacy. “I’ve spent many hours and weeks and months and years thinking about whether anything I’ve done has made a net positive impact on society or humanity at all,” he says. He has blocked certain websites, turned off push notifications, restricted his use of the Telegram app to message only with his wife and two close friends, and tried to wean himself off Twitter. “I still waste time on it,” he confesses, “just reading stupid news I already know about.” He charges his phone in the kitchen, plugging it in at 7pm and not touching it until the next morning.

“Smartphones are useful tools,” he says. “But they’re addictive. Pull-to-refresh is addictive. Twitter is addictive. These are not good things. When I was working on them, it was not something I was mature enough to think about. I’m not saying I’m mature now, but I’m a little bit more mature, and I regret the downsides.””
tech  how_we_work  politics  culture  how_we_live  democracy 
8 weeks ago by alexpriest
Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks alarmed by a race for human attentio
articles  internet  culture 
8 weeks ago by gmisra
'He sometimes finds himself clicking on the red icons beside his apps “to make them go away”, but is conflicted about the ethics of exploiting people’s psychological vulnerabilities. “It is not inherently evil to bring people back to your product,” he says. “It’s capitalism.”'

Good, good...keep going.
grim-meathook-future 
8 weeks ago by bokane
The Google, Apple and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks who worry the race for human attention has created a world of perpetual distraction that could ultimately end in disaster
technology  smartphone  addiction  attention  psychology  stefanimhoff-de 
8 weeks ago by kogakure
'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia
design  technology 
8 weeks ago by apbitner
“One reason it is particularly important for us is that we may be the last generation that can remember life before”
from twitter
8 weeks ago by arainert
It all began in 2013, when he was working as a product manager at Google, and circulated a thought-provoking memo, A Call To Minimise Distraction & Respect Users’ Attention, to 10 close colleagues. It struck a chord, spreading to some 5,000 Google employees, including senior executives who rewarded Harris with an impressive-sounding new job: he was to be Google’s in-house design ethicist and product philosopher.

Looking back, Harris sees that he was promoted into a marginal role. “I didn’t have a social support structure at all,” he says. Still, he adds: “I got to sit in a corner and think and read and understand.”
design  technology  ethics 
8 weeks ago by crankyuser
Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  addiction  attention  internet 
8 weeks ago by cristianconti
“One reason I think it is particularly important for us to talk about this now is that we may be the last generation that can remember life before,” Rosenstein says. It may or may not be relevant that Rosenstein, Pearlman and most of the tech insiders questioning today’s attention economy are in their 30s, members of the last generation that can remember a world in which telephones were plugged into walls.
writing  from iphone
8 weeks ago by iagor
RT @JamesFallows: Pls take 30 mins non-distracted to read https://t.co/8EBWGe38aW and https://t.co/swoIqYrh8n on individual / cultural effe…
via:packrati.us 
8 weeks ago by mshook
“It is not inherently evil to bring people back to your product,” he says. “It’s capitalism.”
technology  guardian  badge  notification  drug  addition 
8 weeks ago by hashier
Pls take 30 mins non-distracted to read and on individual / cultural effects of social media
from twitter_favs
8 weeks ago by wlanderson
Pls take 30 mins non-distracted to read and on individual / cultural effects of social media
from twitter_favs
8 weeks ago by ThomNagy
A graduate of Stanford University, Harris studied under BJ Fogg, a behavioural psychologist revered in tech circles for mastering the ways technological design can be used to persuade people. Many of his students, including Eyal, have gone on to prosperous careers in Silicon Valley.
technology  ethics  cognition  design 
8 weeks ago by craniac
'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia | Technology | The Guardian
IFTTTTwitter 
8 weeks ago by scottmoff
RT : "Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves"
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by antoniodini
RT : "Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves"
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by jfuentejr
RT : attention is the currency of the dystopia we’re living in.
from twitter
9 weeks ago by adrianh
Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks alarmed by a race for human attention
technology 
9 weeks ago by dangeranger
Actually pretty legit, though it elides the role of surveillance / analytics / metrics.
design  facebook  ethics  software  addiction  networks  politics  apocalypse 
9 weeks ago by brennen
Justin Rosenstein had tweaked his laptop’s operating system to block Reddit, banned himself from Snapchat, which he compares to heroin, and imposed limits on his use of Facebook. But even that wasn’t enough. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
9 weeks ago by sarahchin
Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks alarmed by a race for human attention
design  ethics  facebook  technology  addiction  attention 
9 weeks ago by soobrosa
"'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia"
from twitter
9 weeks ago by peterjblack
"the largest, most standardised and most centralised form of attentional control in human history."
from twitter
9 weeks ago by grantpotter
The Guardian
10/5/17
9 weeks ago by seandanaher
'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia
Design  App  psychology  ethics  digital-ethics 
9 weeks ago by PieroRivizzigno