Why Doctors Hate Their Computers | The New Yorker


101 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 10 days ago.


Atul Gawande on the promise of digitization to make medical care easier and more efficient, and whether screens may be coming between doctors and patients.
newswire 
6 hours ago by kejadlen
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
medicine  healthcare  IT  bureacracy  doctors  computers 
yesterday by mirthe
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient; instead, doctors feel trapped behind their screens. Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny…
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2 days ago by argonaut
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer. via Pocket
3 days ago by laurajnash
“We ultimately need systems that make the right care simpler for both patients and professionals, not more complicated. And they must do so in ways that strengthen our human connections, instead of weakening them.”
computers  medicine  usability  software  ux 
3 days ago by leereamsnyder
Adaptation requires two things: mutation and selection. Mutation produces variety and deviation; selection kills off the least functional mutations. Our old, craft-based, pre-computer system of professional practice—in medicine and in other fields—was all mutation and no selection. There was plenty of room for individuals to do things differently from the norm; everyone could be an innovator. But there was no real mechanism for weeding out bad ideas or practices.

Computerization, by contrast, is all selection and no mutation. Leaders install a monolith, and the smallest changes require a committee decision, plus weeks of testing and debugging to make sure that fixing the daylight-saving-time problem, say, doesn’t wreck some other, distant part of the system.
3 days ago by tinotopia
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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3 days ago by nugent
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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4 days ago by paryshnikov
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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4 days ago by mattl
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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4 days ago by frog
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer.
article 
4 days ago by mud
Why Doctors Hate Their Computers via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2PbKpzJ
IFTTT  Instapaper 
4 days ago by stephenfrancoeur
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
healthcare  digital-health  digital-culture  doctor  computer-aversion 
5 days ago by PieroRivizzigno
A 2016 study found that physicians spent about two hours doing computer work for every hour spent face to face with a patient—whatever the brand of medical software.

Before, Sadoughi almost never had to bring tasks home to finish. Now she routinely spends an hour or more on the computer after her children have gone to bed.

Ordering a mammogram used to be one click,” she said. “Now I spend three extra clicks to put in a diagnosis. When I do a Pap smear, I have eleven clicks. It’s ‘Oh, who did it?’ Why not, by default, think that I did it?” She was almost shouting now. “I’m the one putting the order in. Why is it asking me what date, if the patient is in the office today? When do you think this actually happened? It is incredible!” The Revenge of the Ancillaries, I thought.
computers  healthcare  medicine  health 
5 days ago by craniac
In my personal life, screens don't sit between me and my GP. But in others' lives?
from twitter
5 days ago by topgold
In my personal life, screens don't sit between me and my GP. But in others' lives?
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5 days ago by dermotcasey
> "It’s a beguiling vision. Many fear that the advance of technology will replace us all with robots. Yet in fields like health care the more imminent prospect is that it will make us all behave like robots. And the people we serve need something more than either robots or robot-like people can provide. They need human enterprises that can adapt to change."
quote  instapaper 
5 days ago by kaiton
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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6 days ago by granth
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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6 days ago by nimprojects
"Why Doctors Hate Their Computers" in this week's New Yorker by the great Atul Gawande (via…
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6 days ago by Smokler
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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6 days ago by junesix
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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6 days ago by stevenbedrick
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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6 days ago by digdoug
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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6 days ago by loganrhyne
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer.
Archive 
6 days ago by dvand5
Doctors are among the most technology-avid people in society; computerization has simplified tasks in many industries. Yet somehow we’ve reached a point where people in the medical profession actively, viscerally, volubly hate their computers.
healthcare  medicine 
7 days ago by rianvdm
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
from instapaper
7 days ago by jrheard
Atul Gawande
7 days ago by brainwane
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer.
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7 days ago by seansharp
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient; instead, doctors feel trapped behind their screens. Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny…
from instapaper
7 days ago by mjbrej
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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7 days ago by nzeribe
Computerization, which simplified tasks in many industries, has largely failed to achieve the same result in healthcare, causing many doctors to hate their PCs
8 days ago by joeo10
Brilliant post by Why Doctors Hate Their Computers - check it out
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8 days ago by mberg
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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8 days ago by AramZS
Why Doctors Hate Their Computers // Many years ago I did a site visit at Mayo Clinic (osten…
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8 days ago by Pfcbenjamin
By CEO of BH, JPM, and Amazon Health partnership
healthcare  medicine  amazon  startups 
8 days ago by cera
From the brilliant, must-read article in by, who else, : Why Doctors Hate Their Computers
from twitter
8 days ago by ampressman
How not to do big systems
health  systems  humans  matcher  technology 
9 days ago by traggett
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
atoll-gawande  new-yorker 
9 days ago by lendamico
> Putting the system first is not inevitable. Postwar Japan and West Germany eschewed Taylor’s method of industrial management, and implemented more collaborative approaches than was typical in the U.S. In their factories, front-line workers were expected to get involved when production problems arose, instead of being elbowed aside by top-down management. By the late twentieth century, American manufacturers were scrambling to match the higher quality and lower costs that these methods delivered. If our machines are pushing medicine in the wrong direction, it’s our fault, not the machines’ fault.
medicine  atul_gawande  dusty  computers  taylorization 
9 days ago by porejide
Why Doctors Hate Their Computers
— Atul Gawande, New Yorker.

Characteristically insightful from .
from twitter
9 days ago by njr0
I’ve come to feel that a system that promised to increase my mastery over my work has, instead, increased my work’s mastery over me. Politics gets in the way of good design, adds to complexity
Sprint2 
9 days ago by neilperkin
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 days ago by adrianhon
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient; instead, doctors feel trapped behind their screens. Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny…
from instapaper
9 days ago by fabiomacori
Atul Gawande
article  medicine  tech 
9 days ago by jacgodl
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer. via Pocket
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9 days ago by archizoo