Why Doctors Hate Their Computers | The New Yorker


131 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 10 weeks ago.


Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
yesterday by hawk_sf
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
articles  computers  healthcare  technology 
13 days ago by gmisra
> Many have been crushed. The Berkeley psychologist Christina Maslach has spent years studying the phenomenon of occupational burnout. She focussed on health care early on, drawn by the demanding nature of working with the sick. She defined burnout as a combination of three distinct feelings: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization (a cynical, instrumental attitude toward others), and a sense of personal ineffectiveness. The opposite, a feeling of deep engagement in one’s work, came from a sense of energy, personal involvement, and efficacy. She and her colleagues developed a twenty-two-question survey known as the Maslach Burnout Inventory, which, for nearly four decades, has been used to track the well-being of workers across a vast range of occupations, from prison guards to teachers.
tech 
21 days ago by ningwie
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer. via Pocket
Pocket 
22 days ago by driptray
100j work the user
Teaching 
24 days ago by scritic
https://media.newyorker.com/photos/5bda2d856c206635ce04893c/master/w_727,c_limit/181112_r33197.jpg On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer.
6 weeks ago by chillinmilan
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
computers  healthcare  medicine  technology  process  hierarchy 
6 weeks ago by soobrosa
As a program adapts and serves more people and more functions, it naturally requires tighter regulation. Software systems govern how we interact as groups, and that makes them unavoidably bureaucratic in nature. There will always be those who want to maintain the system and those who want to push the system’s boundaries. Conservatives and liberals emerge.
essays 
6 weeks ago by cipherpolice
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient; instead, doctors feel trapped behind their screens. Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny…
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7 weeks ago by szymon
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
8 weeks ago by petulantskeptic
So many amazing nuggets in this article:
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8 weeks ago by planetearthjason
"Human beings do not only rebel. We also create. We force at least a certain amount of mutation, even when systems resist. Consider that, in recent years, one of the fastest-growing occupations in health care has been medical-scribe work, a field that hardly existed before electronic medical records. Medical scribes are trained assistants who work alongside physicians to take computer-related tasks off their hands. This fix is, admittedly, a little ridiculous. We replaced paper with computers because paper was inefficient. Now computers have become inefficient, so we’re hiring more humans. And it sort of works."
medicine  technology  computers  atulgawande 
8 weeks ago by sspela
Why Doctors Hate Their Computers #sociocose https://t.co/H4sPA7ITu4
sociocose 
8 weeks ago by ciocci
Atul Gawande on the promise of digitization to make medical care easier and more efficient, and whether screens may be coming between doctors and patients.
newswire 
8 weeks ago by kejadlen
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
medicine  healthcare  IT  bureacracy  doctors  computers 
9 weeks ago by mirthe
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient; instead, doctors feel trapped behind their screens. Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny…
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9 weeks ago by argonaut
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer. via Pocket
9 weeks ago by laurajnash
“We ultimately need systems that make the right care simpler for both patients and professionals, not more complicated. And they must do so in ways that strengthen our human connections, instead of weakening them.”
computers  medicine  usability  software  ux 
9 weeks ago by leereamsnyder
Adaptation requires two things: mutation and selection. Mutation produces variety and deviation; selection kills off the least functional mutations. Our old, craft-based, pre-computer system of professional practice—in medicine and in other fields—was all mutation and no selection. There was plenty of room for individuals to do things differently from the norm; everyone could be an innovator. But there was no real mechanism for weeding out bad ideas or practices.

Computerization, by contrast, is all selection and no mutation. Leaders install a monolith, and the smallest changes require a committee decision, plus weeks of testing and debugging to make sure that fixing the daylight-saving-time problem, say, doesn’t wreck some other, distant part of the system.
9 weeks ago by tinotopia
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient; instead, doctors feel trapped behind their screens. Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny…
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9 weeks ago by rybesh
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by nugent
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by paryshnikov
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by mattl
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by frog
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer.
article 
9 weeks ago by mud
Why Doctors Hate Their Computers via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2PbKpzJ
IFTTT  Instapaper 
9 weeks ago by stephenfrancoeur
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?
healthcare  digital-health  digital-culture  doctor  computer-aversion 
9 weeks ago by PieroRivizzigno
A 2016 study found that physicians spent about two hours doing computer work for every hour spent face to face with a patient—whatever the brand of medical software.

Before, Sadoughi almost never had to bring tasks home to finish. Now she routinely spends an hour or more on the computer after her children have gone to bed.

Ordering a mammogram used to be one click,” she said. “Now I spend three extra clicks to put in a diagnosis. When I do a Pap smear, I have eleven clicks. It’s ‘Oh, who did it?’ Why not, by default, think that I did it?” She was almost shouting now. “I’m the one putting the order in. Why is it asking me what date, if the patient is in the office today? When do you think this actually happened? It is incredible!” The Revenge of the Ancillaries, I thought.

Something’s gone terribly wrong. Doctors are among the most technology-avid people in society; computerization has simplified tasks in many industries. Yet somehow we’ve reached a point where people in the medical profession actively, viscerally, volubly hate their computers.
computers  healthcare  medicine  health 
9 weeks ago by craniac
In my personal life, screens don't sit between me and my GP. But in others' lives?
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9 weeks ago by dermotcasey
In my personal life, screens don't sit between me and my GP. But in others' lives?
from twitter
9 weeks ago by topgold
> "I’d talked to dozens of experts, but Cameron might have been the wisest of them all. There was something comforting about the way he accepted the inevitability of conflict between our network connections and our human connections. We can retune and streamline our systems, but we won’t find a magical sweet spot between competing imperatives. We can only insure that people always have the ability to turn away from their screens and see each other, colleague to colleague, clinician to patient, face to face."
quote  instapaper 
9 weeks ago by kaiton
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by granth
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by nimprojects
"Why Doctors Hate Their Computers" in this week's New Yorker by the great Atul Gawande (via…
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9 weeks ago by Smokler
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by junesix
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by stevenbedrick
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by digdoug
Illustration by Ben Wiseman On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of…
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9 weeks ago by loganrhyne
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer.
Archive 
9 weeks ago by dvand5
Doctors are among the most technology-avid people in society; computerization has simplified tasks in many industries. Yet somehow we’ve reached a point where people in the medical profession actively, viscerally, volubly hate their computers.
healthcare  medicine 
9 weeks ago by rianvdm