Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser | Aeon Ideas


36 bookmarks. First posted by dindit 13 days ago.


A bulk of research has already shown that this kind of third-person thinking can temporarily improve decision making. Now a preprint at PsyArxiv finds that it can also bring long-term benefits to thinking and emotional regulation. The researchers said this was ‘the first evidence that wisdom-related cognitive and affective processes can be trained in daily life, and of how to do so’.
psychology  illeism 
22 hours ago by asl2
The Mirror ( c 1900) by William Merritt Chase. Courtesy Cincinnati Art Museum/Wikipedia We credit Socrates with the insight that ‘the unexamined life is not…
from instapaper
yesterday by motdiem
If I was considering an argument that I’d had with a friend, for instance, I might start by silently thinking to myself: ‘David felt frustrated that…’ The idea is that this small change in perspective can clear your emotional fog, allowing you to see past your biases.

A bulk of research has already shown that this kind of third-person thinking can temporarily improve decision making. Now a preprint at PsyArxiv finds that it can also bring long-term benefits to thinking and emotional regulation. The researchers said this was ‘the first evidence that wisdom-related cognitive and affective processes can be trained in daily life, and of how to do so’.

[...]

Grossmann’s aim is to build a strong experimental footing for the study of wisdom, which had long been considered too nebulous for scientific enquiry. In one of his earlier experiments, he established that it’s possible to measure wise reasoning and that, as with IQ, people’s scores matter. He did this by asking participants to discuss out-loud a personal or political dilemma, which he then scored on various elements of thinking long-considered crucial to wisdom, including: intellectual humility; taking the perspective of others; recognising uncertainty; and having the capacity to search for a compromise. Grossmann found that these wise-reasoning scores were far better than intelligence tests at predicting emotional wellbeing, and relationship satisfaction – supporting the idea that wisdom, as defined by these qualities, constitutes a unique construct that determines how we navigate life challenges.
psychology  selfhelp 
5 days ago by terry
The Mirror ( c 1900) by William Merritt Chase. Courtesy Cincinnati Art Museum/Wikipedia We credit Socrates with the insight that ‘the unexamined life is not…
from instapaper
7 days ago by urbansheep
The Mirror ( c 1900) by William Merritt Chase. Courtesy Cincinnati Art Museum/Wikipedia We credit Socrates with the insight that ‘the unexamined life is not…
from instapaper
7 days ago by Aetles
We credit Socrates with the insight that ‘the unexamined life is not worth living’ and that to ‘know thyself’ is the path to true wisdom. But is there a right and a wrong way to go about such self-reflection?  Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser
Archive  best  stories  hacker  news 
7 days ago by Agiza
Speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser via Instapaper https://aeon.co/ideas/why-speaking-to-yourself-in-the-third-person-makes-you-wiser
IFTTT  Instapaper 
7 days ago by zhangtai
It’s likely to cause you to become stuck in the rut of your own thoughts and immersed in the emotions that might be leading you astray. Certainly, research has shown that people who are prone to rumination also often suffer from impaired decision making under pressure, and are at a substantially increased risk of depression. ... this small change in perspective can clear your emotional fog, allowing you to see past your biases.
@Article  Self-awareness  Consciousness  Decision-making  Emotion  @HOWTO  PerspectiveAndFraming  Problem-solving  CognitiveBias  Wisdom 
8 days ago by jslu
Wisdom and good decision making are within your power: just as soon as you start speaking of yourself in the third person
via:molloy 
8 days ago by AstroBadger
We credit Socrates with the insight that ‘the unexamined life is not worth living’ and that to ‘know thyself’ is the path to true wisdom. But is there a right and a wrong way to go about such self-reflection?  via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
9 days ago by arronpj
'...the scientific research suggests that you should adopt an ancient rhetorical method favoured by the likes of Julius Caesar and known as ‘illeism’ – or speaking about yourself in the third person (the term was coined in 1809 by the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge from the Latin ille meaning ‘he, that’). If I was considering an argument that I’d had with a friend, for instance, I might start by silently thinking to myself: ‘David felt frustrated that…’ The idea is that this small change in perspective can clear your emotional fog, allowing you to see past your biases. -- ... Grossmann’s aim is to build a strong experimental footing for the study of wisdom, which had long been considered too nebulous for scientific enquiry. In one of his earlier experiments, he established that it’s possible to measure wise reasoning and that, as with IQ, people’s scores matter. He did this by asking participants to discuss out-loud a personal or political dilemma, which he then scored on various elements of thinking long-considered crucial to wisdom, including: intellectual humility; taking the perspective of others; recognising uncertainty; and having the capacity to search for a compromise. Grossmann found that these wise-reasoning scores were far better than intelligence tests at predicting emotional wellbeing, and relationship satisfaction – supporting the idea that wisdom, as defined by these qualities, constitutes a unique construct that determines how we navigate life challenges.'
psychology  wisdom  thinking 
9 days ago by adamcrowe
vedi, che facevamo bene a parlare qui in terza persona
from twitter
10 days ago by gluca
David Robson (a science journalist specialising in the extremes of the human brain, body and behaviour), Aeon, 2019-Aug-9
2019  DavidRobson  behavior  social-sciences 
10 days ago by amoore
scientific research suggests that you should adopt an ancient rhetorical method favoured by the likes of Julius Caesar and known as ‘illeism’ – or speaking about yourself in the third person (the term was coined in 1809 by the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge from the Latin ille meaning ‘he, that’).
–––––
this small change in perspective can clear your emotional fog, allowing you to see past your biases.
––––
elements of thinking long-considered crucial to wisdom, including: intellectual humility; taking the perspective of others; recognising uncertainty; and having the capacity to search for a compromise
–––
these wise-reasoning scores were far better than intelligence tests at predicting emotional wellbeing, and relationship satisfaction – supporting the idea that wisdom, as defined by these qualities, constitutes a unique construct that determines how we navigate life challenges.
lifehack  philopoli 
12 days ago by trianta
RT atmostbeautiful : 인생의 지혜는 지적 겸허, 남의 관점에서 보기, 불확실성 인정, 타협 모색 능력이다. 자신을 3인칭으로 두고 생각해보는 illeism의 태도를 취하면 좀 더 현명한 결정 내린다. 일기를 1인칭이 아닌 3인칭 주어로 썼을 때 지혜 평점이 더 높게 나오고 감정조절과 안정감도 앞서. http://bit.ly/2ZFWhLK August 07, 2019 at 08:37PM http://twitter.com/atmostbeautiful/status/1159066073007706113
IFTTT  Twitter  ththlink 
12 days ago by seoulrain