When Twenty-Six Thousand Stinkbugs Invade Your Home | The New Yorker


22 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 march 2018.


The brown marmorated stinkbug often congregates indoors in exorbitant numbers. Illustration by David Plunkert Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature…
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6 weeks ago by archangel
The brown marmorated stinkbug often congregates indoors in exorbitant numbers. Illustration by David Plunkert Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature…
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9 weeks ago by AramZS
In general, it’s often difficult to notice the damage done by stinkbugs, at least at first. Unlike, say, locusts, which simply raze entire fields, stinkbugs wreak their havoc insidiously. The injury they do to corn, for instance, is invisible until the ear is husked, at which point certain kernels—the ones into which a stinkbug stuck its pointy mouth—will reveal themselves to be sunken and brown, like the teeth of a witch. Similarly, stinkbugs suck the juice out of apples through nearly invisible punctures,
brown  marmorated  stink  bugs 
10 weeks ago by starrjulie
These uniquely versatile bugs are decimating crops and infiltrating houses all across the country. Will we ever be able to get rid of them?
ecology  invasive  bug  us  agriculture 
11 weeks ago by soobrosa
Such a good, horrifying piece
ecology  entomology  scales  science 
12 weeks ago by madamim
“It was like a horror movie,” Stone recalled. She and Zimmerman fetched two brooms and started sweeping down the walls. Pre-stinkbug crisis, the couple had been unwinding after work (she is an actress, comedian, and horse trainer; he is a horticulturist), and were notably underdressed, in tank tops and boxers, for undertaking a full-scale extermination. The stinkbugs, attracted to warmth, kept thwacking into their bodies as they worked. Stone and Zimmerman didn’t dare kill them—the stink for which stinkbugs are named is released when you crush them—so they periodically threw the accumulated heaps back outside, only to realize that, every time they opened the doors to do so, more stinkbugs flew in. It took them forty-five minutes to clean the place, at which point, exhausted, they dropped into bed and switched off the lights.

Moments later, something went barrelling across the room, sounding, as stinkbugs do, like an angry and overweight wasp. The couple jumped up and turned the lights back on. Looking for the stray bug, Stone pulled a painting off the wall and turned it around; dozens of stinkbugs covered the back. She opened a drawer of the dresser: dozens more. That’s when she and Zimmerman realized that they were going to have to treat their bedroom “like a hazmat situation.”
longread 
march 2018 by rosscatrow
One October night a few years back, Pam Stone was downstairs watching television with her partner, Paul Zimmerman, when it struck her that their house was unusually cold.
pocket 
march 2018 by martinkelley
The writing in this New Yorker article about stinkbugs is ridiculously good.
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march 2018 by Laurenbacon
The brown marmorated stinkbug often congregates indoors in exorbitant numbers. Illustration by David Plunkert Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature…
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march 2018 by abrad45
The brown marmorated stinkbug often congregates indoors in exorbitant numbers. Illustration by David Plunkert One October night a few years back, Pam Stone was…
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march 2018 by wahoo5
The brown marmorated stinkbug often congregates indoors in exorbitant numbers. Illustration by David Plunkert Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature…
from instapaper
march 2018 by toph
Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone. One October night a few years back, Pam Stone was downstairs watching television with her partner, Paul Zimmerman, when it struck her that their house was unusually cold.
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march 2018 by seansharp
The brown marmorated stinkbug often congregates indoors in exorbitant numbers. Illustration by David Plunkert One October night a few years back, Pam Stone was…
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march 2018 by johnrclark
One October night a few years back, Pam Stone was downstairs watching television with her partner, Paul Zimmerman, when it struck her that their house was unusually cold. via Pocket
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march 2018 by archizoo