The Cult of DD


24 bookmarks. First posted by Chirael 6 weeks ago.


You’ll often see instructions for creating and using disk images on Unix systems making use of the dd command. This is a strange program of obscure provenance that somehow, still manages to survive in the 21st century.
linux  Linux_Applications  Linux_Development 
5 weeks ago by GameGamer43
Actually, using dd is almost never necessary, and due to its highly nonstandard syntax is usually just an easy way to mess things up
wrk-tec 
5 weeks ago by jamescampbell
dd vs cat on Unix
unix  linux  history 
6 weeks ago by dezrtfox
TIL: dd is almost never what you want. To copy an image to a device, `cat iso > /dev/sdx` does the same thing.
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6 weeks ago by andydavies
You’ll often see instructions for creating and using disk images on Unix systems making use of the dd command. This is a strange program of obscure provenance that somehow, still manages to survive in the 21st century.
linux  unix  tutorial 
6 weeks ago by ssorc
RT : The cult of dd: (cat is often better -- reminds me of the 'useless use of cat' greybeard perspective)
from twitter
6 weeks ago by DRMacIver
You’ll often see instructions for creating and using disk images on Unix systems making use of the dd command. This is a strange program of obscure provenance that somehow, still manages to survive in the 21st century.

Actually, using dd is almost never necessary, and due to its highly nonstandard syntax is usually just an easy way to mess things up. For instance, you’ll see instructions like this asking you to run commands like:

# Obscure dd version
dd if=image.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=4M
Guess what? This is exactly equivalent to a regular shell pipeline using cat and shell redirection:

# Equivalent cat version
cat image.iso >/dev/sdb
That weird bs=4M argument in the dd version isn’t actually doing anything special—all it’s doing is instructing the dd command to use a 4 MB buffer size while copying. But who cares? Why not just let the command figure out the right buffer size automatically?
unix  history  reference 
6 weeks ago by Chirael