3 years on Google App Engine. An Epic Review.


34 bookmarks. First posted by vscarpenter march 2017.


For the last 3 years I worked on an application that runs on Google App Engine. It is a fascinating, unique piece of service Google is offering here. Unlike anything you'll find elsewhere. This is my in-depth, personal take on it. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
february 2018 by domingogallardo
3 years on Google App Engine. An Epic Review.
from twitter
january 2018 by e30chris
For the last 3 years I worked on an application that runs on Google App Engine. It is a fascinating, unique piece of service Google is offering here. Unlike anything you'll find elsewhere. This is my in-depth, personal take on it. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  refind  s 
january 2018 by igorette
Some restrictions and annoyances are the result of neglect by Google, though. It feels like they only invest the bare minimum anymore. Actually, I have had this feeling for the last two years. It is frustrating to work with an ancient tech stack, without any hope of improvement in sight. It is infuriating if there are known issues but they are not fixed. It is depressing to receive so little information on where the platform is heading. You feel trapped.


By using Google App Engine, you can run your app on top of (probably) the world's best infrastructure. Also, you receive functionality out of the box that would take at least a dozen add-ons from third parties on Heroku or a few weeks of setup if done on your own. This is GAE's appeal.

Noteworthy applications that run on GAE include Snapchat and Khan Academy.
GAE  google  cloud  aws 
january 2018 by euler
Observability / Correlation / Trace

There is a lot to be said about Google Cloud Support. First of all, without it we would have been in serious trouble now and then. So having it is a must for any mission-critical application - in my eyes. For example, about once a year our application would just stop serving requests. There was nothing we did to cause that. After contacting Google support we would learn that they moved our application to a 'different cluster'. And it just worked again. It is a very scary situation. You cannot do anything but 'pray to the Google gods'.
...
One very unique idea you can see here is that logs are always grouped by request. In all other tools I have encountered, Kibana for instance, you will only get the log lines that match your search. By always showing all other log lines around the one that matches your search, it gives you more context. I find this extremely helpful when investigating issues in the logs since it immediately helps you to better understand what happened. I truly miss that feature in every other log viewer I use.

Another interesting trait of the App Engine is that each HTTP request is automatically assigned a request ID. It is added to the incoming HTTP request and uniquely identifies it. This can come in handy to correlate a request with its logs. For example, we were sending emails when an uncaught exception occurred and included the request ID - this made it trivial to look up the logs. The same can be done for frontend error tracking.

Metrics
The Cloud Console gives access to a few basic application metrics. This includes the request volume and latency, traffic volume, memory usage, number of instances and error count. It is useful as a starting point when investigating an issue and when you want to get a quick first impression of the general state of the app.
google  cloud  monitoring 
january 2018 by janpeuker
Three Years on Google App Engine
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january 2018 by demon386
Three Years on Google App Engine: Comments:
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december 2017 by isaacsu
Ouch. The cost of forking platforms for deep integration.

The next thing you might notice when you start developing is that you can not use Java 8. Even though Java 7's end of life was in 2015, it is still very much alive and kicking on GAE. The third highest voted issue on GAE's issue tracker is support for Java 8 (the second highest is support for Python 3). It was created in 2013. Since then, the only shred of news about any progress on the matter is a post on the App Engine mailing list from 2016, stating engineers are actively working on it. Well, good for you.

One of the many benefits of using a Goliath’s infrastructure.

One nice little feature I'd like to highlight is the geographical HTTP headers: for each incoming user request, Google adds headers that contain the user's country, region, city as well as latitude and longitude of said city. This can be very useful, for example for pre-filling phone number country codes or detecting unusual account login locations. The accuracy also seems pretty high from our observations. It is usually very cumbersome and/or expensive to get that kind of information with this level of accuracy from a third party API or database. So getting it for free on App Engine is a nice bonus.
google  cloud  review  gae 
december 2017 by jefframnani
Frozen in time review of GAE in 2017.
google-app-engine  google  gae 
august 2017 by ajohnson1200
For the last 3 years I worked on an application that runs on Google App Engine. It is a fascinating, unique piece of service Google is offering here. Unlike anything you'll find elsewhere. This is my in-depth, personal take on it.
googleappengine  google  google-app-engine  gae 
march 2017 by vscarpenter