warrenellis + history   212

The fantastic adventures of the tartan-turbaned colonel | The Spectator
Once dismissed as an exotic fraud, Alexander Gardner was indeed the dare-devil Himalayan explorer he claimed to beIf much remained mysterious about Gardner, this was at least partly due to the difficulty in communicating with him. This visitors attributed

variously to his lack of teeth, his liking for alcohol, his considerable age or the sing-song lilt of his rusty English; it could equally have been caused by the gash in his throat which was the most obvious of his many wounds and which obliged him to clamp a pair of forceps to his neck whenever he ate or drank.
history 
5 weeks ago by warrenellis
Technoccult News: The Real Wizard Was Inside You All Along
..."textualism and the pre-Islamic practices of taking holy words and phrases and turning them into charms, written on slips of paper or inscribed into metal or pottery. The idea being that the very words would be imbued with the holy power of the one who spoke or wrote them, and since, in God would have created the words and spake them in Arabic, then that would make the very language of Arabic, and even the letters of the Arabic language, holy."
magic  history  myth 
8 weeks ago by warrenellis
Signs of early settlement in the Nordic region date back to the cradle of civilization
The discovery is also an indication that Nordic societies were far more developed 9,200 years ago than what was previously believed. The findings are important as it is usually argued that people in the north lived relatively mobile lives, while people in the Levant—a large area in the Middle East—became settled and began to farm and raise cattle much earlier.
history 
february 2016 by warrenellis
Ancient maps of Jupiter's path show Babylonians' advanced maths | New Scientist
Thanks to a clue from a 50-year old photograph, a historian has decoded a mysterious trapezoid described on ancient Babylonian astronomical tablets.

That previously unexplained description is a scheme to predict Jupiter’s place in the zodiac – and it shows that ancient Mesopotamian astronomers beat Europeans by at least 1500 years in grasping the ideas that led to integral calculus.
history 
january 2016 by warrenellis
Scientists sequence ancient British 'gladiator' genomes from Roman York
"Cutting-edge genome technology in Trinity College Dublin has cast more light on a mystery that has perplexed archaeologists for more than a decade. The origins of a set of Roman-age decapitated bodies, found by York Archaeological Trust at Driffield Terrace in the city, have been explored, revealing a Middle Eastern body alongside native British."
history 
january 2016 by warrenellis
The New Sound Of Music 1979 (Part 1) - YouTube
The New Sound of Music is a fascinating BBC historical documentary from the year 1979. It charts the development of recorded music from the first barrel organs, pianolas, the phonograph, the magnetic tape recorder and onto the concepts of musique concrete and electronic music development with voltage-controlled oscillators making up the analogue synthesizers of the day.
music  history  video 
january 2016 by warrenellis
Scientists peg Anthropocene to first farmers
"A new analysis of the fossil record shows that a deep pattern in nature remained the same for 300 million years. Then, 6,000 years ago, the pattern was disrupted—at about the same time that agriculture spread across North America."
history 
december 2015 by warrenellis
Four pre-Inca tombs found in Peru's Lima
The find confirms the historical presence in Lima of the Ichma culture. It took hold on the central coast around 1000 and disappeared around 1450 as Inca civilization began to spread.
"These are the first four tombs of the Ichma culture. We think that we may still find more" despite long-term looting, said Flores, who has been researching the site for more than three decades.
history 
december 2015 by warrenellis
Scientists discover ancient 3-armed sea monster unlike any living species | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building
Tribrachidium lived during the late Ediacaran period, over 100 million years before the first plants would appear on land. The late Ediacaran immediately preceded the Cambrian Explosion, which ushered in unprecedented ecological diversity and complexity. An early evolutionary experiment, Tribrachidium‘s body consisted of a flat disc from which three arms extend upward. This form is unique in that it demonstrates three-fold symmetry. Nearly all vertebrates, including humans, and many invertebrates demonstrate two-fold symmetry. While there are some creatures like the starfish that maintain five-fold symmetry, there are no living creatures today that are three-fold.
history 
december 2015 by warrenellis
Secret pagan basilica in Rome emerges from the shadows after 2,000 years - Telegraph
"The subterranean basilica, which predates Christianity, was built by a rich Roman family who were devotees of a little-known cult called Neopythagoreanism. Originating in the first century BC, it was a school of mystical Hellenistic philosophy that preached asceticism and was based on the writings of Pythagoras and Plato."
history 
november 2015 by warrenellis
Europe's fourth ancestral 'tribe' uncovered - BBC News
Research shows Europeans are a mixture of three major ancestral populations - indigenous hunters, Middle Eastern farmers and a population that arrived from the east during the Bronze Age.
DNA from ancient remains in the Caucasus has now revealed a fourth population that fed into the mix.
history 
november 2015 by warrenellis
16th century church emerges from water in Mexico
A 16th century church submerged in a southern Mexico dam project 49 years ago has reappeared following a severe drought, drawing visitors by boat to gaze at the spectacular ruins.
history 
october 2015 by warrenellis
Aboriginal female hunters aided by dingoes
"The research suggests this increase in the variety of animals eaten by Aboriginal people was because women used dingoes to hunt small animals such as goannas."
history 
october 2015 by warrenellis
Giant killer lizard fossil shines new light on early Australians
"As if life wasn't hard enough during the last Ice Age, research led by the University of Queensland has found Australia's first human inhabitants had to contend with giant killer lizards."
history 
october 2015 by warrenellis
Galaksija, Cult Yugoslav DIY Computer from the 1980s Lives On | Balkanist
"During the mid-1980s, Belgrade radio show Ventilator 202 broadcast computer software live so that listeners could record games and electronic journals onto cassette tapes. Some of this software was programmed and submitted by listeners themselves, reflecting an early open source ethos. Galaksija games like Light Cycle Race and Diamond Mine were available free to anyone with a radio and a tape recorder."
history  comp  comms 
october 2015 by warrenellis
Fight on to preserve Elfdalian, Sweden's lost forest language | ScienceNordic
"Secret language has preserved linguistic features that are to be found nowhere else in Scandinavia."
language  history 
october 2015 by warrenellis
Meteorites in Cult & Religion 1
"The tribes of the Clackamas in Oregon claim that they once worshiped the giant Willamette meteorite, one of the largest irons known, weighing about 15 tons. Prior to hunting, the Clackamas dipped the heads of their arrows and lances into the water that had gathered in the large cavities of the iron - they were convinced that this ritual would harden their weapons and grant them success in their hunt."
history  cult  weird 
september 2015 by warrenellis
Where bread began: Ancient tools used to reconstruct—and taste—prehistoric cuisine
"Using 12,500-year-old conical mortars carved into bedrock, they reconstructed how their ancient ancestors processed wild barley to produce groat meals, as well as a delicacy that might be termed "proto-pita" - small loaves of coal-baked, unleavened bread. In so doing, they re-enacted a critical moment in the rise of civilization: the emergence of wild-grain-based nutrition, some 2,000 to 3,000 years before our hunter-gatherer forebears would establish the sedentary farming communities which were the hallmark of the "Neolithic Revolution"."
food  history 
august 2015 by warrenellis
UK marine researchers receive 'oldest message in a bottle'
"Tossed into the North Sea sometime between 1904 and 1906, the bottle washed up on the beach on the German island of Amrum, and was found by a couple in April. Inside they found a postcard asking that it be sent to the Marine Biological Association of the U.K.—which they did."
history 
august 2015 by warrenellis
Untouched cave to provide clues to Black Hills history
"On Monday, a team of scientists led by East Tennessee State University professor Jim Mead will begin unearthing the entrance of the cave, hauling out bags of sediment and animal bones to be carefully analyzed. They have already found bones dating back nearly 11,000 years and the remains of at least three species that hadn't been found in the region before—the pika, pine marten and platygonus, an extinct relative of the modern-day peccary."

"Persistence Cave"
history  geo 
june 2015 by warrenellis
Research challenges the view that Neolithic societies were egalitarian
"The data obtained by Teresa Fernández-Crespo in seven megalithic graves in La Rioja and Araba-Álava suggest that certain individuals were excluded from burial on the basis of "criteria relating to age and possibly sex". So the existence of a funerary recruitment system that marginalised a considerable proportion of the population, according to the UPV/EHU researcher, could be pointing to the fact that the collective use of a shared burial area, which has often been understood as an egalitarian sign of megalithic societies, could in actual fact be masking the privileges of communities that were starting to become hierarchized."
history 
may 2015 by warrenellis
Group wants to bring back Native Hawaiian burial traditions
"Traditional "clean burials" involve cleansing the deceased by fire in a pit and then compressing the skeletal remains, wrapping them in a cloth woven from trees, and burying them in a basket."
history  death 
april 2015 by warrenellis
Neanderthals manipulated the bodies of adults and children shortly after death
"Neanderthals from the French region of Poitou-Charentes cut, beat and fractured the bones of their recently deceased companions, as revealed by the fossil remains of two adults and a child found at the Marillac site. These manipulations have been observed at other Neanderthal sites, but scientists still do not know whether they did this for food or ceremony."
history 
april 2015 by warrenellis
Did Richard III manage to keep his scoliosis a secret up until his death in 1485?
"In a new study published in Medical Humanities this month (April), Dr Mary Ann Lund, of the University of Leicester's School of English, argues that as with all monarchs Richard's body image in life was carefully controlled and he probably kept any signs of his scoliosis hidden outside of the royal household - up until his death."
history 
april 2015 by warrenellis
Abandoned Rails: Home
"Thousands of miles of railroads have been abandoned in the United States, much of it in the last 40 years. All of these abandoned railways have a history and a story. This web site is dedicated to the preservation of the history of each of these former railroad lines and the companies that operated them."
history 
april 2015 by warrenellis
Inspired By Monks, A Writer Embraces His Life Of Solitude : NPR
"Brother Fenton, after whom I was named, brought his fruitcake recipe to the monastery, partly as a way of getting lots of whiskey into the monastery. He devised a recipe that had a lot of whiskey in it."
history  writing 
march 2015 by warrenellis
The Collection and the Cloud – The New Inquiry
"The concept of a “dark age” implies that there is a singular body of canonical knowledge worth preserving, evoking an idea of erasure from history that’s familiar to anyone else besides a distinguished white man accustomed to historical centrality. For everyone else, erasure from history is political struggle. Even today, women, people of color, transgender and disabled people, sex workers, care workers are all struggling to have their stories told and represented fairly. Any discussion of internet archiving has to, at some point, confront this problem: How do we talk about the politics of cultural records? If we cannot preserve everything, who defines what is worth saving?"
pol  tech  web  history  social 
march 2015 by warrenellis
LiveLeak.com - Russia:EXCLUSIVE - Drone captures Tesla Tower - the Soviet era “lightning machine”
Normally hidden from prying eyes, Ruptly was allowed take exclusive drone footage of the stunning 'Tesla Tower' in the Moscow region, Wednesday. The vast research site is home to general enormous voltage impulse generators that potentially have the capacity to equal Russia's entire electricity output
video  tech  history 
february 2015 by warrenellis
New tattoos discovered on Oetzi mummy
"The newly discovered tattoos on the ribcage have now reopened the debate about the role of tattoos in prehistoric times. This investigation has given researchers a new piece to add to the jigsaw puzzle when trying to tease out whether prehistoric tattoos had a therapeutic, symbolic or religious significance."
history  tattoos  bodymod 
january 2015 by warrenellis
The Doves Type Revival | The Casual Optimist
"Between August 1916 and January 1917 Cobden-Sanderson, a printer and bookbinder, dropped more than a tonne of metal printing type from the west side of the bridge. He made around 170 trips in all from his bindery beside the pub, a distance of about half a mile, and always after dusk. At the start he hurled whole pages of type into the river; later he threw it like bird seed from his pockets. Then he found a small wooden box with a sliding lid, for which he made a handle out of tape—perfect for sprinkling the pieces into the water, and not too suspicious to bystanders."
printing  history  crime  weird 
january 2015 by warrenellis
55,000-year-old skull links modern man in vicinity of Neanderthals
"Characteristics of a partial skull recently discovered in Manot Cave in Israel's West Galilee provide the earliest evidence that modern humans co-inhabited the area with Neanderthals and could have met and interbred 55,000 years ago."
history 
january 2015 by warrenellis
Ancient Sea Rise Tale Told Accurately for 10,000 Years - Scientific American
"Without using written languages, Australian tribes passed memories of life before, and during, post-glacial shoreline inundations through hundreds of generations as high-fidelity oral history. Some tribes can still point to islands that no longer exist—and provide their original names."
history 
january 2015 by warrenellis
Long-necked 'dragon' discovered in China
"Qijianglong (pronounced "CHI-jyang-lon") is about 15 metres in length and lived about 160 million years ago in the Late Jurassic. The name means "dragon of Qijiang," for its discovery near Qijiang City, close to Chongqing. The fossil site was found by construction workers in 2006, and the digging eventually hit a series of large neck vertebrae stretched out in the ground. Incredibly, the head of the dinosaur was still attached. "It is rare to find a head and neck of a long-necked dinosaur together because the head is so small and easily detached after the animal dies," explains Miyashita."
history 
january 2015 by warrenellis
A Visit to Pendle Hill – Hybridity Tales (Part 1)
"When the old witch had been sent to Lancaster, a grand convocation of seventeen witches and three wizards was held at Malkin Tower on Good Friday, at which it was determined to kill Mr. M’Covell, the governor of the castle, and blow up the building, to enable the witches to make their escape."
history 
january 2015 by warrenellis
Would You Like Some History With Your News? - ReadWrite
"Timeline was born out of personal frustration with the lack of historic and geographic context in current affairs: so much sensationalism couple with almost no depth," CEO Tamer Hassanein said in a press release.
apps  news  history 
january 2015 by warrenellis
Study casts doubt on mammoth-killing cosmic impact
"Rock soil droplets formed by heating most likely came from Stone Age house fires and not from a disastrous cosmic impact 12,900 years ago, according to new research from the University of California, Davis. The study, of soil from Syria, is the latest to discredit the controversial theory that a cosmic impact triggered the Younger Dryas cold period."
history 
january 2015 by warrenellis
Intensive agriculture may have exacerbated drought in ancient Maya city
"The ancient Maya city of Tikal may have used intensive agricultural practices to maintain its large population, according to a study by David Lentz of the University of Cincinnati and colleagues. While these practices enabled sustainable population growth for some time, they may eventually have exacerbated a drought that caused the abandonment of the city."
history 
january 2015 by warrenellis
Scientists discover oldest stone tool ever found in Turkey
"Scientists have discovered the oldest recorded stone tool ever to be found in Turkey, revealing that humans passed through the gateway from Asia to Europe much earlier than previously thought, approximately 1.2 million years ago."
history 
december 2014 by warrenellis
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