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The Two-Year Lag from Web 2.0 to Enterprise 2.0
by Hutch CarpenterThe Enterprise 2.0 sector draws heavy inspiration from innovations in the Web 2.0 world. Indeed, the name itself, Enterprise '2.0' reflects this influence. From a product management perspective, Web 2.0, and its derivations social networking and social media are great proving grounds for features before coding them into your application.A fruitful area to review is how long it takes for a feature to go from some level of decent adoption in the consumer realm to becoming part of the mainstream Enterprise 2.0 vendor landscape. The list of features that have made the jump - forums, wikis, blogs, tagging, social networking, activity streams, status updates - is impressive. Let's look at three features that made the leap, with an eye toward how long it took.Here's the back-up for those dates.Wikis: Wikis got their start back in 1995. From there they grew, and the application became popular with computer programmers. But it hadn't caught hold outside that culture. Wikipedia was launched in January 2001, and grew rapidly over its first two years. It wasn't yet mainstream, but it clearly had caught a wave among early adopters. As recounted on the history of wikis page in Wikipedia, 2004-2006 saw an explosion of interest in wikis from companies.Social networking: Defined as enabling social profiles, and connecting with others. Facebook started in 2004, and grew very popular among colleges. In 2006, it opened up its membership beyond college students, and turned down a $1 billion offer from Yahoo! Clearly, the company was on fire (even then).In April 2008, Jive released Clearspace 2.0, which was touted as Facebook for the enterprise. Socialtext 3.0 was released in September 2008, and it included Socialtext People, its social networking feature. And I can tell you that at BEA Systems, there was a second quarter 2008 release of a Facebook for the enterprise in the Aqualogic product line.Microblogging: Twitter. The source of it all. Twitter actually was conceived as an idea back in 2000, and company was started from a 2006 brainstorming session at Odeo. But it really hit big with the early adopter set at 2007's South by Southwest (SXSW).Microblogging broke into the Enterprise 2.0 world when Yammer won best-of-show at the September 2008 TechCrunch 50. But that doesn't count as mainstreaming into Enterprise 2.0. Yammer proceeded to grow strongly the next few months. And Socialtext introduced Signals in March 2009.So there's some documentation backing my 2-year cycle for Web 2.0 innovations to move from hitting the early adopter set to the Enterprise 2.0 sector. Note that this doesn't apply to every Web 2.0 innovation. No one ever talked about "MySpace for the Enterprise" and there's really not a Flickr in the Enterprise 2.0 umbrella.Which raises a question about today's hottest Web 2.0 trend...Foursquare for the Enterprise?Foursquare, and its up-n-coming competitor Gowalla, are all the rage these days. These location-based social networks are good for seeing what friends are doing. Foursquare also integrates features that reward participation (points), add a sense of competition (mayors) and provide recognition (badges).Mark Fidelman recently wrote about Foursquare and Enterprise 2.0. And using our handy two-year lag calculation, somewhere in early 2012 the first mainstream Enterprise 2.0 will integrate Foursquare features. Actually, two of them.Location check-insEmployees will check in their locations from all around the globe. Sales meetings, customer on-site deployments, sourcing trips, conferences, etc. Sure, this info might be in the Outlook Calendar. But even if it is, Outlook Calendar entries aren't social objects. These check-ins will allow you to know where colleagues are, including those you don't know well. But wouldn't it be nice to know if some other employee visited someplace you're investigating?These check-ins can be even more tactical. Folks who are part of a meeting in a conference room all check-in. Voila! Meeting attendance, which everyone can see. For an individual employee, these check-ins become a personal history of what you did over the past week.Mayorships, Badges, PointsFoursquare makes it fun, and for many people, addicting, to check-in. You get points and *bonuses* when you check into the places you go. If you check in to the same place enough times, you get to be mayor of a venue and tweet it about it. You earn badges for accomplishing different things in the Foursquare system.These features have had the effect of motivating legions of people to participate. It's fun to see your stats. It's fun to get a little competitive. It's great when you get that notification that you've earned a new badge.Andrew McAfee wrote a series of posts exploring the question of whether knowledge workers should have Enterprise 2.0 ratings. This chart was from one of his posts:Well, the Foursquare approach certainly takes us down this path, albeit in a fun way.So what do you think? Personally, I'm looking forward to more Foursquare in the enterprise.Don't miss an article - Subscribe to our RSS feed and join our Continuous Innovation group!Hutch Carpenter is the Vice President of Product at Spigit. Spigit integrates social collaboration tools into a SaaS enterprise idea management platform used by global Fortune 2000 firms to drive innovation.
Social_Network  Foursquare  Web_Applications  Web_2.0  Innovation  Hutch_Carpenter  Enterprise_2.0  from google
march 2010 by tinynow
Three Enterprise 2.0 Themes to Watch in 2010
by Hutch CarpenterEnterprise 2.0 continued its growth and maturation in 2009. We saw the rise of the Enterprise 2.0 consultancies, including Dachis Group, Altimeter Group and Pragmatic Enterprise 2.0. Andrew McAfee published his book about Enterprise 2.0. We saw the rise of the 2.0 Adoption Council. And based on what can be gleaned from vendors, more enterprises are deploying social software.For 2010, three themes will impact the sector. These aren't the only ones, but I expect to see plenty of news, features and industry mental energy covering these.#1: Impact of SharePoint 2010It's coming. SharePoint 2010. Microsoft's upcoming release for the enterprise received good attention during the SharePoint Conference in Las Vegas. Features include:Social profilesAn actual wiki BlogsActivity streamsStatus updatesPresence statusSocial bookmarkingTagsRatingsAs a list of capabilities, this certainly is impressive and quite a departure from SharePoint 2007's social software efforts. The devil is in the details, of course.But generally, customers who have been "making do" with 2007 will suddenly have an attractive option from Microsoft. SharePoint 2010 will likely be a big catalyst for Enterprise 2.0 growth.The coming release of SharePoint 2010 is forcing many vendors to evaluate their positions in the market. Going head-to-head with the same or fewer features is going to be tough. What differentiates your offering? My Jaws picture refers to this dynamic facing Enterprise 2.0 vendors.There will be articles reviewing 2010. There will be blog posts dismissing its capabilities or lack thereof. But there will be impact in the corporate world.#2: Enterprise 2.0 Becomes "Like Air"At Defrag 2008, I caught Charlene Li's presentation, where she said, "social networks will be like air." The premise of her talk is that social network aspects will become less a destination URL and more an integrated part of experience throughout the web and mobile.We're seeing signs of a similar shift in the enterprise. Enterprise 2.0 is becoming less a destination and many of its concepts are being integrated into non-social software apps. Salesforce's Chatter and Tibco's Tibbr were end-of-year examples of this. As Dana Gardner writes on Seeking Alpha:"This is a clear sign that the enterprise software and social software worlds are munging. Get ready to see a lot more."Salesforce and Tibco won't be the last. Expect more announcements in this vein for 2010. Mike Gotta noted that this concept was called "contextual collaboration", and was promoted by Matt Cain in the late 1990s. The web 2.0 tools of today are better, more diverse, more scalable and better adapted to human behaviors than whatever was available a decade ago.Putting these tools in-the-flow will be a powerful basis for expanding Enterprise 2.0's reach. A challenge for standalone general tools of today is that they require employees to toggle between different apps. This can make it tough to get traction. For example, Intellipedia has been making a difference, but it's still just "a marginal revolution." Not all agencies have made it part of daily work.In the European Oracle Enterprise 2.0 Group on LinkedIn, Oracle's VP of Enterprise 2.0 for EMEA asked this question:"What the article doesn't cover and where I would be interested in your views is how the use of E2.0 tools would enable the Business Processes themselves to be changed. Or innovated completely. For example, how do you bring Crowdsourcing, Idea Engines, Prediction Markets etc and integrate those into ERP systems?"Yes, even Oracle is discussing this concept. Watch how this theme unfolds in 2010.#3: Enterprise 2.0 Market StratifiesI see the Enterprise 2.0 market splitting into these two models:General collaboration suites that replace intranets and portalsSpecialized applications that deliver tangible value around a specific activityWatching the progression of general collaboration suite vendors, I've always believed their ultimate goal is to replace existing 1.0 intranets and portals. After all, once an Enterprise 2.0 vendor's solution...has the ability to store and organize files,provides pages for company-wide and team-specific communications,offers powerful search capabilities,includes APIs for third party integration,can be organized into multiple spaces, andhas a superset of the elements of the corporate directory,...why would a company maintain both the intranet and the social software suite. Pick one. The Enterprise 2.0 vendors still need to mature their product further to become the company intranet/portal. But I see that as their destination.Meanwhile, a new crop of vendors have dispensed with the pursuit of all-everything suite approach. Rather, they build applications that integrate social in solving specific problems (e.g. Spigit for innovation management). Gartner analyst Anthony Bradley tabs these vendors' offerings as "activity-specific social applications". These vendors build in functionality that solves specific problems for companies, usually with definable ROI.I expect the general collaboration suite vendors will offer their own specialized modules as well, in order to offer tangible ROI solutions to their customers.Watch how this stratification dynamic plays out in 2010.Those are my thoughts - what do you think?Hutch Carpenter is the Vice President of Product at Spigit. Spigit integrates social collaboration tools into a SaaS enterprise idea management platform used by global Fortune 2000 firms to drive innovation.
Social_Network  Management  Social_Media  collaboration  Hutch_Carpenter  Enterprise_2.0  from google
january 2010 by tinynow

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