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showing only instapaper [see all]
6 Meditation Hacks For The Distracted Brain
"It often helps to be able to focus your attention on something monotonous to calm your brain. Counting your inhales and exhales is one of the easiest methods. All you have to do is count to 10 on your inhale and your exhale. One trick I learned from Dr Joe Dispenza is to imagine your head as a cloudy fish bowl and with each breath you slowly pump out the cloudiness. After twenty deep inhales and exhales, the bowl becomes clear."
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
What I Do When I Can’t Focus
"That means every time you’re not focused; you’re giving someone or something permission to enter your mind."
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
Are You Really Facebook’s Product?
"How about this, then, as an (admittedly ungainly) alternative to that overused maxim: “If you aren’t paying for it with money, you’re paying for it in other ways.” Whether it’s your time, your privacy, or your intellectual property, you’re giving over to Facebook something of value every time you use it. That’s especially true anytime you use it in a new way—whether that’s signing up for a new app, accepting updated Terms of Service, or even just trying a new feature, like Facebook Watch, which inevitably generates for Facebook fresh behavioral data and enhances its understanding of you."
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
Are You Really Facebook’s Product?
"Facebook’s mistake in the Cambridge Analytica case was that it failed to treat users’ data as a valuable product."
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
Are You Really Facebook’s Product?
"So the real questions are: Is Facebook’s free model the primary cause of its shortcomings as a source of information and a guardian of users’ data? And if so, what possible remedies does that suggest? Specifically: Would requiring people to pay for Facebook really fix its problems?"
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
Are You Really Facebook’s Product?
"In this respect, Facebook is nearly TV’s opposite. The social network stands accused of unduly amplifying, not crushing, divisive views—of polarizing rather than homogenizing us. The critique of Facebook as a news source is that it has undermined, not entrenched, established sources of information, putting sites run by Russian spooks and Macedonian teens on the same footing as the New York Times or broadcast networks"
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
Are You Really Facebook’s Product?
"While TV networks didn’t collect viewers’ personal data on anything like the scale that Facebook does today, they did carefully study their audience demographics and pitch those to advertisers. Facebook can show your ad to males aged 25 to 54 in Houston whose browsing habits suggest they like football; ABC’s Houston affiliate can show your ad to everyone who’s watching Monday Night Football, with roughly similar results."
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
It’s Time to Unlock The Web
"The thing is, plenty of publishers and creators have been ahead of the curve on this one, even if we don’t give them much credit for it. They knew that free content can, in fact, be very costly and that real freedom comes from knowledge that’s expensive to produce. They understood that when Stewart Brand famously said that “information wants to be free” he meant free as in “speech” (libre), not free as in “beer” (gratis)."
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
The death of the newsfeed
"All social apps grow until you need a newsfeed
All newsfeeds grow until you need an algorithmic feed
All algorithmic feeds grow until you get fed up of not seeing stuff/seeing the wrong stuff & leave for new apps with less overload
All those new apps grow until..."
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
The death of the newsfeed
"One basic problem here is that if the feed is focused on ‘what do I want to see?’, then it cannot be focused on ‘what do my friends want (or need) me to see?’ Sometimes this is the same thing - my friend and I both want me to see that they’re throwing a party tonight. But if every feed is a sample, then a user has no way to know who will see their post. Indeed, conceptually one might suggest that they have no way to know if *anyone* will see this post. Of course, Facebook’s engagement teams won’t let that happen - if I feel too much that I’m shouting into the wilderness I’ll leave (this is one of Twitter’s new user problems), and so I’ll be rationed out at least enough exposure to friends and engagement feedback to keep posting. Until you don’t. But if something was really important, why would you put it on Facebook?"
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
The death of the newsfeed
"It’s useful here to compare the newsfeed challenge with the Google’s search results challenge. Google has to work out the best 10 results to show, using all sorts of judgements about what signals work best and what signals matter more, just as the newsfeed does - it can’t just show you the results by some objective measure like date or file size. It can offer complex controls and filters to fiddle with, but like Facebook it has to get things right without such controls because most people won’t ever touch them. And also like Facebook, of course, it has people trying to game the system. Unlike Facebook, though, Google has explicit intent - you told it what you wanted to see. And so if Google shows me exactly what I told it I wanted, it’s succeeded, even if I ‘shouldn’t’ have searched for that. Facebook has no such direct signal. There are things it ‘shouldn’t’ show me, even if my uncle did share them. But what are those things, and who should decide, and what does the weighting look like?"
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
The death of the newsfeed
"The logic seems (or at any rate seemed) unavoidable. So, instead of a purely random sample, you get a sample based on what you might actually want to see.

Unavoidable as it seems, though, this approach has two problems. First, getting that sample ‘right’ is very hard, and beset by all sorts of conceptual challenges. But second, even if it’s a sucessful sample, it’s still a sample."
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
The death of the newsfeed
"This is the logic that led Facebook inexorably to the ‘algorithmic feed’, which is really just tech jargon for saying that instead of this random (i.e. 'time-based') sample of what’s been posted, the platform tries to work out which people you would most like to see things from, and what kinds of things you would most like to see. It ought to be able to work out who your close friends are, and what kinds of things you normally click on, surely?"
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
The death of the newsfeed
"This overload means it now makes little sense to ask for the ‘chronological feed’ back. If you have 1,500 or 3,000 items a day, then the chronological feed is actually just the items you can be bothered to scroll through before giving up, which can only be 10% or 20% of what’s actually there. This will be sorted by no logical order at all except whether your friends happened to post them within the last hour. It’s not so much chronological in any useful sense as a random sample, where the randomizer is simply whatever time you yourself happen to open the app. ’What did any of the 300 people that I friended in the last 5 years post between 16:32 and 17:03?’ Meanwhile, giving us detailed manual controls and filters makes little more sense - the entire history of the tech industry tells us that actual normal people would never use them, even if they worked. People don't file."
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
The death of the newsfeed
"Pushing a little further, it seems to me that Zuckerberg’s law, such as it is, is really an observation about the models for following people that social media platforms have evolved, in which sharing something onto your own feed is not the same as sending it to any particular person. You would not send 10 pictures of your child or dog to everyone in your address book very often, if ever, and most people (under 50) would not send every funny or enraging news article they see to everyone in their address book either, but the asymmetric feed makes posting at that kind of frequency normal instead of rude. Since you’re posting it to ‘your’ feed instead of sending it explicitly to someone, it’s OK to post lots and to post less important things. That, in turn, takes us to the tragedy of the commons - we’re ‘supposed’ to post stuff, but by posting stuff, we overload each other’s feeds. Facebook’s Growth team was too good at its job."
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
How to Structure Your Day Using Time Tracking Techniques
RT @TimingApp: How to Structure Your Day Using Time Tracking Techniques #Productivity #TimeTracking
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
Congress Is Missing the Point on Facebook
"If politicians want to create rules, they should start by narrowly addressing the worst possible uses for our personal information — the ways it can be used to deny people job opportunities, limit access to health insurance, set interest rates on loans and decide who gets out of jail. Essentially any bureaucratic decision can now be made by algorithm, and those algorithms need interrogating way more than Zuckerberg does."
from instapaper
april 2018
Productivity
"If you find yourself not liking what you’re doing for a long period of time, seriously consider a major job change. Short-term burnout happens, but if it isn’t resolved with some time off, maybe it’s time to do something you’re more interested in."
from instapaper
april 2018
Productivity
"Picking the right thing to work on is the most important element of productivity and usually almost ignored."
from instapaper
april 2018
Publishers Haven't Realized Just How Big a Deal GDPR is
"Let me just remind you of the basic principles of GDPR in a simplified way:

Everything must be consent based.
You can only collect what is adequate, necessary, and not excessive in relation to the specific service you offer.
People have the right to transparency.
People have the right to be forgotten.
IP addresses are also considered to be personal information."
from instapaper
april 2018
What Zuckerberg Forgot To Mention… Profiling – Privacy International – Medium
"Privacy settings alone won’t address the problems that profiling poses. That is why regulating profiling, is perhaps one of the most pressing privacy issue of our time. Using advanced processing techniques, and increasingly also AI methods like machine learning, the scope of what can be predicted from what kinds of data is increasing."
from instapaper
april 2018
What Zuckerberg Forgot To Mention… Profiling – Privacy International – Medium
"Social media data is not the only data that’s valuable for profiling. All sorts of data can be used to predict all sorts of intimate insights. Here are some examples: With a high level of precision, researchers were able to use knowledge of installed smartphone apps to figure out users’ personal information, including “religion, relationship status, spoken languages, countries of interest, and whether or not the user is a parent of small children” as well as gender. In a study that tracked the cell phone usage (bluetooth, call logs, and SMS) of 26 couples, researchers were able to predict the spending behavior of those couples. We’ve complied more examples here."
from instapaper
april 2018
What Zuckerberg Forgot To Mention… Profiling – Privacy International – Medium
"Here’s a very simple example: in the U.K. Facebook allows advertisers to marked products to “Commuters”. There is no box on Facebook where people can declare themselves as “commuters” — this is clearly a category that is derived or inferred from data that Facebook automatically collects about people."
from instapaper
april 2018
What Zuckerberg Forgot To Mention… Profiling – Privacy International – Medium
"Profiling practices and the predictive privacy harms they entail are widespread. When Facebook says that it targets people based on the information they share, this is only half the picture. Targeting is not just based the information that people share and that the company records about their behaviour — it is also based on the hidden patterns that these data reveal."
from instapaper
april 2018
What Zuckerberg Forgot To Mention… Profiling – Privacy International – Medium
"There is no specific field on Facebook that prompts you to type your personality profile, or other psychometric data, yet Cambridge Analytica claims to have possessed such information on millions of people."
from instapaper
april 2018
What Zuckerberg Forgot To Mention… Profiling – Privacy International – Medium
"In both hearings before the Senate, Zuckerberg only mentioned two kinds of data: the information that people decide to share on the platform, and the data that is automatically collected about people’s behaviour. But there’s a third kind of data: data that is derived, inferred, or predicted from the data that people share and that is recorded about their behaviour."
from instapaper
april 2018
What Zuckerberg Forgot To Mention… Profiling – Privacy International – Medium
"Facebook likes to talk about privacy settings, and people’s control over the content they put on the platform. But Facebook doesn’t like to talk about how exactly this data can be used to profile and target people."
from instapaper
april 2018
Tvingades bort från Mittmedia – nu går han sin egen väg igen
"– Kanske bromsas utvecklingstakten inom techsektorn, men folk måste ju få bestämma själva om de stöttar olika tekniktjänster med sina privata angelägenheter eller inte. Företagen får förbättra kundnyttan, transparensen och trovärdigheten för att hänga med."
from instapaper
april 2018
Tvingades bort från Mittmedia – nu går han sin egen väg igen
"Bara i EU omsätter digital annonsering 400 miljarder kronor. Av det är omkring 70 procent datadrivet eller programmatiskt, påstår Thomas Peterssohn. Enligt branchorganisationen IAB riskerar hälften av det att försvinna i och med GDPR. Ett hårt men nödvändigt slag, menar han."
from instapaper
april 2018
Tvingades bort från Mittmedia – nu går han sin egen väg igen
"– GDPR är i huvudsak bra. Den flyttar makten över människors data från en övermodig big-data-industri tillbaka till individerna. Det blir därmed svårare för företag att bedriva kommersiella verksamheter runt databehandling."
from instapaper
april 2018
Tvingades bort från Mittmedia – nu går han sin egen väg igen
"Alla i annonsbranschen håller på med den här datainsamlingen – och det är de som kommer att påverkas som mest när man tillämpar den nya lagen i maj. För den kommer bland annat kräva att publicister och annonsörer ger privatpersoner chansen att samtycka till datainsamlingen. Du måste fråga om lov, men samtycket får inte vara inbakat i en lång användarbeskrivning. Det ska vara så tydligt att våra föräldrar som saknar datorvana ska kunna förstå vad som händer. Lika lätt som de samtycker ska de även kunna dra sig ur och kräva tillbaka all data. Du får dessutom inte heller samla på dig en massa data och använda den i andra sammanhang än de du uttryckt. Det vi försöker göra är att bygga en plattform som hanterar de här frågorna för inte minst många mindre annonsörer."
from instapaper
april 2018
12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech
"Once we know the forces that shape technology, we can start to drive change. If we know that the biggest cost for the tech giants is attracting and hiring programmers, we can encourage programmers to collectively advocate for ethical and social advances from their employers. If we know that the investors who power big companies respond to potential risks in the market, we can emphasize that their investment risk increases if they bet on companies that act in ways that are bad for society.

If we understand that most in tech mean well, but lack the historic or cultural context to ensure that their impact is as good as their intentions, we can ensure that they get the knowledge they need to prevent harm before it happens."
from instapaper
april 2018
12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech
"Individuals: Companies like Apple and Amazon want you to pay them directly for their products, or for the products that others sell in their store. (Although Amazon’s Web Services exist to serve that Big Business market, above.) This is one of the most straightforward business models—you know exactly what you’re getting when you buy an iPhone or a Kindle, or when you subscribe to Spotify, and because it doesn’t rely on advertising or cede purchasing control to your employer, companies with this model tend to be the ones where individual people have the most power."
from instapaper
april 2018
12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech
"The problem is far more serious when we consider regulators and elected officials, who often brag about their illiteracy about tech. Having political leaders who can’t even install an app on their smartphones makes it impossible to understand technology well enough to regulate it appropriately, or to assign legal accountability when tech‘s creators violate the law. Even as technology opens up new challenges for society, lawmakers lag tremendously behind the state of the art when creating appropriate laws."
from instapaper
april 2018
12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech
"Advertising: Google and Facebook make nearly all of their money from selling information about you to advertisers. Almost every product they create is designed to extract as much information from you as possible, so that it can be used to create a more detailed profile of your behaviors and preferences, and the search results and social feeds made by advertising companies are strongly incentivized to push you toward sites or apps that show you more ads from these platforms. It’s a business model built around surveillance, which is particularly striking since it’s the one that most consumer internet businesses rely upon."
from instapaper
april 2018
12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech
"Big Business: Some of the larger (generally more boring) tech companies like Microsoft and Oracle and Salesforce exist to get money from other big companies that need business software but will pay a premium if it’s easy to manage and easy to lock down the ways that employees use it. Very little of this technology is a delight to use, especially because the customers for it are obsessed with controlling and monitoring their workers, but these are some of the most profitable companies in tech."
from instapaper
april 2018
12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech
"Only about 15% of programmers work at startups, and in many big tech companies, most of the staff aren’t even programmers anyway. So the focus on defining tech by the habits or culture of programmers that work at big-name startups deeply distorts the way that tech is seen in society. Instead, we should consider that the majority of people who create technology work in organizations or institutions that we don’t think of as “tech” at all."
from instapaper
april 2018
12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech
"But until the very recent backlash against some of the worst excesses of the tech world, there had been little progress in increasing the expectation of ethical education being incorporated into technical training."
from instapaper
april 2018
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