teymur + ssd   5

Mac OS X Lion has TRIM support for SSDs, HiDPI resolutions for improved pixel density?
As you'd expect, developers have wasted no time in tearing apart the Mac OS X Lion preview, and in so doing they've allegedly discovered some intriguing things -- namely, support for the SSD-wiping TRIM command, and a series of high-DPI display modes which would allow for icons and UI elements with twice the graphical detail -- which could mean a PC-sized Retina Display. The former doesn't sound like the most exciting upgrade, but it's truly a boon for Mac users with solid state storage, as TRIM can greatly improve write speeds in compatible drives. As far as the improved pixel density rumors are concerned, it's not clear whether Apple's actually looking at doubling display resolutions in new computers (9to5Mac imagines a 15-inch MacBook Pro with a 2880 x 1800 screen) or whether Apple's simply moving to maintain icons that are precisely the same physical size across all its displays -- which would make fantastic sense for a touchscreen UI, by the way.Mac OS X Lion has TRIM support for SSDs, HiDPI resolutions for improved pixel density? originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 26 Feb 2011 19:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
Permalink Electronista, CrunchGear  |  MacRumors, MacGeneration  | Email this | Comments
10.7  Apple  DPI  HiDPI  icon  icons  Lion  Mac_OS_X  Mac_OS_X_Lion  MacOsX  MacOsXLion  pixel_density  PixelDensity  resolution  screen_resolution  ScreenResolution  solid_state_storage  SolidStateStorage  SSD  TRIM  from google
february 2011 by teymur
ioSafe Rugged Portable hard drive wrapped in Full Metal Jacket, probably tougher than you
With a name like ioSafe, you know it's hardcore. The company has made a name for itself by concocting products that can outlast minor disasters, and per usual, it's using CES as a springboard for something else that you probably can't destroy. This year, the Rugged Portable is on display, arriving in a pair of enclosure options and offering a bundled data recovery service to boot. The unit is quite literally wrapped in metal -- the aluminum option can withstand up to 2,500 pounds of force, while the titanium shell doubles that up and shrugs its shoulders at up to 5,000 pounds. It's also immune to submersion -- your data remains safe in up to ten feet of salt water for as long as 72 hours, and it'll still come out unscathed when dipped in oil and other toxins.

Naturally, the HDD or SSD within (your call there) is covered by suspension springs, and the USB 3.0 interface ensures that you won't be waiting around in the jungle for things to transfer. Those who snap one up will get one year of data recovery service included, a one-year 'No Hassle' warranty and up to $5000 for "third party forensic recovery services" if needed. Time Machine owners will be happy to know that this drive is fully compatible with the service, and you'll be able to select HDDs from 250GB to 1TB or SSDs from 256GB to 512GB. As for prices? $149.99 for the stock 250GB HDD aluminum version, $3,899.99 for the 512GB SSD titanium build with an extended warranty, and everywhere in between. It's up for pre-order today and should ship later this month in the US, with global availability details to follow in due time.Continue reading ioSafe Rugged Portable hard drive wrapped in Full Metal Jacket, probably tougher than you
ioSafe Rugged Portable hard drive wrapped in Full Metal Jacket, probably tougher than you originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 04 Jan 2011 19:17:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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aluminum  ces  ces_2011  Ces2011  iosafe  ioSafe_Rugged_Portable  IosafeRuggedPortable  rugged  solid_state_drive  SolidStateDrive  ssd  storage  titanium  tough  usb_3.0  Usb3.0  from google
january 2011 by teymur
3TB HD, triple SSD iMac turnkey drive upgrades available from OWC
In the never-ending search for bigger and faster storage options, Mac users have a number of sources for hard drives, but OWC has been a favorite for many Apple fans since the late 1980s. Now the company is offering a set of turnkey eSATA add-ons and upgrades for mid-2010 27" iMacs that should make almost any space-challenged Machead happy.

The upgrade paths are all outlined on a special configuration web page on OWC's site. It all starts with an internal boot solid-state drive. If you already have the 256GB internal SSD option installed in your iMac, then you're ready to go -- if not, then you move on to the next step, which is to add either an eSATA port or an internal SSD.

You then have the option of adding more SSDs (up to a total three 480GB drives) and/or a big 7200 RPM hard drive. Adding the "last" SSD disables your internal SD card reader, but never fear -- OWC throws in a USB card reader to replace it. The capacity of the 7200 RPM hard drive can be up to 3TB, making for a lot of built-in storage.

My personal dream configuration, if money was no object (and it is), would be to get a 480GB SSD installed for a boot and applications drive, a second 480GB SSD for mirroring the first drive, and a 3TB drive for all of my data. Then I'd have the eSATA port installed and put my original 2TB internal drive into an OWC eSATA enclosure for doing some backups. Throw in a 16GB RAM upgrade, an external Blu-Ray read/write drive, and a three-year extended warranty, and the cost would be right around $3,000.

It is great to see these kinds of storage options available for iMacs, and tremendous fun to price out the different configurations. If money was no object, what would you have OWC install in your 27" iMac?

[via Electronista]
3TB HD, triple SSD iMac turnkey drive upgrades available from OWC originally appeared on TUAW on Tue, 07 Dec 2010 11:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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eSATA  hard_drive  HardDrive  Mac  OWC  solid_state_drive  SolidStateDrive  SSD  upgrade  from google
december 2010 by teymur
MacBook Air upgrade kit bumps capacity to 256GB, turns old module into USB 3.0 SSD
Sure, the only remotely user-replaceable component on the 11.6-inch MacBook Air are those tiny Toshiba SSDs, but PhotoFast's got what might be one of the most elegant upgrade solutions we've ever seen. The Air USB 3 Adapter gives you not only a brand-spanking-new 256GB module with a Sandforce SF-1200 controller, but a speedy USB 3.0 flash drive too -- which smartly doubles as the mechanism by which you move your old files over, as you can just transfer everything through the USB port. Once you're done swapping modules, the company says you'll see a 30 percent speed boost over the original drive, with reported transfer rates of 250MB/s on both sequential reads and writes. Shame the Japanese company didn't specify any sort of estimated release date or price.MacBook Air upgrade kit bumps capacity to 256GB, turns old module into USB 3.0 SSD originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 27 Oct 2010 04:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
Permalink Engadget Japanese  |  PhotoFast  | Email this | Comments
air  flash_memory  FlashMemory  MacBook_Air  MacbookAir  MBA  PhotoFast  SandForce  sandforce_sf-1200  SandforceSf-1200  sf-1200  solid_state_drive  SolidStateDrive  SSD  storage  superspeed_USB  SuperspeedUsb  USB_3  USB_3.0  Usb3  Usb3.0  from google
october 2010 by teymur
Expensive, Yet Fast Describes Iomega's USB 3.0 SSD Flash Drives [Ssd]
USB 3.0 is fast. Faster than standard 7200 RPM disks can handle. So how do you make external storage faster to better fill up the transfer pipe? By putting an SSD inside. More »
Ssd  Flash_Drives  Iomega_ssd  Ssd_external  USB  usb_3.0  Usb3  from google
october 2010 by teymur

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