since1923 + campbell   53

Plot Driven: Alan Cheuse's Top 5 Fiction Picks | NPR
The Stark River, Bonnie Jo Campbell writes of her invented central Michigan setting in Once Upon a River, "flows around the oxbow at Murrayville the way blood flowed through Margo Crane's heart ..." Whether upstream or downstream, Campbell's full-blooded young heroine wants to make her own way.
campbell  bestof11 
november 2011 by since1923
Once Upon a River | Shelf Awareness for Readers
Campbell's skill in shaping her main character is one of the greatest strengths of this novel. She writes with a highly original voice, yet also with a sense of subtlety; Margo is an unusual teen protagonist. Campbell's descriptions of the moving water and the related landscape are nicely rendered in this novel and illuminate its homage to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Margo's odyssey along the river is life-defining, and lucky readers will travel with her to the water's end.
campbell 
august 2011 by since1923
Once Upon a River review | The Nervous Breakdown
Bonnie Jo Campbell’s newest novel has been reviewed everywhere from the New Yorker to Entertainment Weekly. I am lucky enough to study in the MFA program at Pacific University, where she teaches, and I would like to add to the polyphony of praise.
campbell 
august 2011 by since1923
People on the River are Happy to Give (You A Really Hard Time) | Forever Young Adult
Margo Crane, you are one tough mothercusser. I’m pretty sure you could out-hunt Katniss, out-shoot Tris and out-spy Kiki strike. In fact, the only thing you can’t seem to do is maintain some self-respect, which drives me crazy cakes, but I also understand. I mean, hello, your mom left you, your dad lives for you, your boy cousins torture you, and every grown man you meet wants to sex you. That’s a lot of shizz for a girl to handle.
campbell 
august 2011 by since1923
‪VIDEO: Bonnie Jo Campbell @ KPL‬‏ | YouTube
A Q&A session with Bonnie Jo Campbell to celebrate the release of her novel, "Once Upon a River," July 6, 2011 at Kalamazoo Public Library. Bonnie Jo takes questions from the audience about writing, editing, reading and more.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Brieflier Noted: Disorderly and Fantastical | The Book Bench @ The New Yorker
Despite the improbabilities of this tale, which is set in the seventies but has more in common with Homer and Twain than with Jimmy Carter, [the] struggle to survive proves irresistible.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campbell's Rural Michigan Gothic | New York Times
It would be too bad if, because of Campbell’s realistic style and ferocious attention to her setting, “Once Upon a River” were discounted as merely a fine example of American regionalism. It is, rather, an excellent American parable about the consequences of our favorite ideal, freedom.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Summer ’11 Reading Roundup | EarlyWord
Parade Magazine weighed in with their 12 picks for summer reading last week (distinguishing themselves by being the only ones to select Bonnie Jo Campbell’s Once Upon a River, getting strong critical acclaim and showing heavy holds in libraries).
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campbell discusses Once Upon a River | Time Out Chicago
“I had to do a lot of shooting to get into Margo’s personality,” Campbell, 48, says. Fifteen-year-old Margo Crane is a product of the Stark River—a fictional tribute to the Kalamazoo River—where she swims, hunts and lives with her father after her mother abandons them. Across the river are her restive cousins, the Murrays, whose father owns the steel mill. The feud between her uncle and her dad ends—and Margo’s river journey begins—with one man dead and one man missing his junk.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Once Upon a River author Bonnie Jo Campbell | Chicago Reader
I think my editor had parental feelings for her; I detected some motherly worry about my girl. But I'm more brutal. I'm the writer. I'm the one who's putting her in all this trouble. I'm the one who's making trouble for poor Margo. What a thing we writers do. We invent characters out of nothing and then we put 'em through hell. 
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
FICTION REVIEW: "Once Upon a River" | Minneapolis Star Tribune
In "Once Upon a River," Bonnie Jo Campbell has given us a haunting moral story, rich with evocative descriptions of the delicacies of nature in the presence of indelicate characters.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
10 Decidedly Highbrow But Still Beach-Appropriate Summer Reads | Flavorwire
One of the most talked-about new releases of the season, this novel will be sure to get you some jealous looks from your fellow literary beachgoers. More importantly, it’s an adventure story that will keep you pinned to your towel. Sixteen-year-old Margo Crane, armed with her trusty rifle, “only a few supplies and a biography of Annie Oakley,” sets off on a river journey through the wilds of rural Michigan in search of her mother. Margo has repeatedly been touted as the female Huck Finn, which means you’ll probably want to be her best friend.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Wild Water: 'River' Runs Deep With Ferocity, Heart | NPR
Summer reads can be frothy adventures, easy to follow even in the midst of a hectic family vacation; or they can be heftier, hard-to-put-down epics that ask us for hours of silence and solitude. Once Upon a River, Bonnie Jo Campbell's second novel, easily falls into the latter category. Set in Michigan in the late 20th century on a fictional river aptly named the Stark, the book is a violent but inspiring tale packed with colorful river dwellers, a working-class community of power company and metal workers, farmers, hunters and housewives. At the center of the story is Margo Crane, a teenage girl with an expert aim and an exceedingly messed up family, who finds much more to admire in Annie Oakley than in her own female relatives.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
'Once Upon a River' gives us a boat, a girl and a hypnotic story | Cleveland Plain Dealer
The short fiction is incendiary, hitting us like fiery shots of whiskey. "Once Upon a River" is more like sipping good wine. It casts its spell slowly, but cast it does.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Once Upon a River review - Bonnie Jo Campbell Review | Entertainment Weekly
What happens to Margo unfolds as a gripping story, old-fashioned in its fullness of event and character 
development. And all the while, an assured Campbell narrates in a graceful, gliding, confident voice 
that steers the action smoothly from one bend in the plot to the next — a 
 demonstration of outstanding skills on the river of American literature.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Episode 103: Bonnie Jo Campbell, 2nd Class Babies, and Getting Outta Dodge | The Dinner Party Download @ American Public Media
This week: Novelist Bonnie Jo Campbell goes zonkeys…The rowdies get out of Dodge…And Ashton Kutcher’s Twitter account solves traffic crises. Plus, a joke from author Matthew Gallaway, and Unknown Mortal Orchestra play “House.”
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Book review: 'Once Upon a River' by Bonnie Jo Campbell | Los Angeles Times
A similar sense of crisis impels Campbell's second novel, "Once Upon a River," which also deals with a 16-year-old adrift on a river, in the wake of tragedy. Actually, the novel has its roots in another "American Salvage" story, "Family Reunion," about a girl taking apt revenge on the uncle who abused her. That character is named Marylou; in "Once Upon a River," Campbell changes it to Margo, but the girl is the same, as is the essence of her journey — which is ostensibly to find the mother who abandoned her but is really about putting some distance between herself and her history and finding a way to navigate the world.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
‘Once Upon a River’ by Bonnie Jo Campbell | The Washington Post
The wonder of “Once Upon a River” is how fresh and weathered it seems at the same time. Ardently turning these pages, I felt as though I’d been waiting for this book and yet somehow already knew it. After her critically acclaimed collection of short stories, “American Salvage,” Bonnie Jo Campbell has built her new novel like a modern-day craftsman from the old timbers of our national myths about loners living off the land, rugged tales as perilous as they are alluring. Without sacrificing any of its originality, this story comes bearing the saw marks of classic American literature, the rough-hewn sister of “The Leatherstocking Tales,” “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and “Walden.”
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Excerpt: Once Upon A River | The Nervous Breakdown
Excerpt from Bonnie Jo Campbell's 'Once Upon A River'
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Most Anticipated: The Great Second-Half 2011 Book Preview | The Millions
At 7,500 words strong and encompassing 66 titles, this is the only second-half of 2011 book preview you will ever need.
campbell  lewis  millet  pierre  enright 
july 2011 by since1923
Great Reads: Once Upon a River | Shelf Awareness
Alan Cheuse has compared Bonnie Jo Campbell with D.H. Lawrence, which means that serious fiction fans will want to pick up her new novel, Once Upon a River (W.W. Norton), if only to discover whether they agree with Cheuse. We think that once you've cracked this book's cover, you'll discover many more reasons to follow the story of teenager Margo Crane, who embarks on a Huck Finn-like odyssey after her father's death, carrying along on Michigan's Stark River little more than a few essential supplies and a book about Annie Oakley.
campbell 
july 2011 by since1923
Book Lover: New Releases for July | Wall Street Journal
"Once Upon a River" has been described as a female "Huckleberry Finn": A 16-year-old girl sets out on a river journey with only her wits, her rifle and a biography of Annie Oakley.
campbell 
june 2011 by since1923
Must-Read Summer Books | The Daily Beast
Once Upon a River. In this beautifully written, action-packed novel, 16-year-old Margo Crane gets raped by her uncle, sees her father murdered, and then takes off in a rowboat to search for her missing mother—and that's the first 50 pages.
campbell 
june 2011 by since1923
Books Preview: Spotting Summer's High Fliers | NPR
Bonnie Jo Campbell's last story collection, American Salvage, won her nominations for the National Book Award and National Book Critic's Circle Award, and now she has emerged with an anticipated new full-length novel, a kind of Huckleberry Finn through female eyes.
campbell 
june 2011 by since1923
Three Books To Take To A Fistfight | NPR
In rural Michigan, the setting of Bonnie Jo Campbell's American Salvage, you'd best thicken your skin, if not to the harsh weather, then to the fact that tragedy lingers in the flesh of this small town, its inhabitants wearing the scars, often literally, of hard lives in a hard place. A girl is clipped by a car and sent flying into a field; a hunter ponders his part in the death of a friend; a family finds their cabin has been turned into a meth lab; a man is left crippled by a boating accident. But these are not quitters, not stone animals lost of humanity. These people fight, often savagely, for the better life, the better love, the connection found and the nightmare purged.
campbell 
april 2011 by since1923
The next, next Great American Novel: Bonnie Jo Campbell's Once Upon A River | My3Books
Like so many great American novels, Margo's story is as much a journey of self-discovery as it is a flight away from those who would try to control her. It's a joy and a thrill to watch Margo come to terms with the world around her and find a way to truly come home.
campbell 
march 2011 by since1923
Best Novels on the Midwest | The Daily Beast
In these stories, Campbell fixates on the rural landscapes of southwest Michigan. She fuses the sacred and the profane in tales that bear the whiff of myth about them. The militia men, the dreamers, the hunters, the underemployed custodians, the farmers, the lonely hearted bigots, the lovers of wilderness and gardens and animals, the protective parents, the meth addicts, the young teens with old souls: These stories shake in the bones. One reads feeling as if we, like the characters peopling a post-industrial land, are on the edge—a way of life ended, or begun; the ground quaking beneath our feet.
campbell 
january 2011 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campbell on Beginings and Endings | Our Town @ Chicago Sun Times
Recently, I spoke with Pushcart Prize winner and National Book Award Finalist, author Bonnie Jo Campbell about her background, writing process and powerful short story collection, “American Salvage.”
campbell 
january 2011 by since1923
Most Anticipated: The Great 2011 Book Preview | The Millions
List includes: Lights Out in Wonderland by DBC Pierre, Townie by Andre Dubus III, and Once Upon a River by Bonnie Jo Campbell.
dubus  campbell  pierre 
january 2011 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campbell and the Strategy of Negation | HTMLGIANT
I keep returning to Bonnie Jo Campbell’s story “The Solutions to Ben’s Problem,” which was first published in The Diagram, and was subsequently reprinted in her collection American Salvage as “The Solutions to Brian’s Problem.” (American Salvage was originally published by tiny Wayne State University Press, and then republished by Norton after the book became an unlikely but well-chosen National Book Award finalist.)
campbell 
november 2010 by since1923
30 Books in 30 Days: American Salvage, by Bonnie Jo Campbell | Critical Mass Blog
In American Salvage, Bonnie Jo Campbell takes the rural Michigan elements of a country song—scarce money, hard liquor, beat-up lives, and battered trucks—and spins them into literature.

Her 14 gritty stories are a revelation, funny and risky, as characters fret over Y2K, fall for the wrong partners, and drop the tailgate on the Ford to sit down. These tales are populated by people who know their way around Marlin rifles, restraining orders, and pig manure. In spry, economical prose, Campbell gives them all a powerful gravitational pull.
campbell 
february 2010 by since1923
Local writer's book wins nomination: Reviewers deem Bonnie Jo Campbell's short-story collection worthy of award | Kalamazoo Living - - MLive.com
Kalamazoo author Bonnie Jo Campbell has garnered another honor for her short story collection “American Salvage.”

On Saturday, she was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction. The winners will be announced on March 11 at a ceremony in New York.
campbell 
january 2010 by since1923
Dark Horse Bonnie Jo Campbell | Virginia Quarterly Review
I took American Salvage with me on a road trip to North Carolina; very few books could tear me away from such fine barbeque. (If you’re down near Durham, I highly recommend the pulled pork sandwich at Allen & Son.) Slaw and pickles spread out around me, I dove into her world of beekeepers, gas men, kings of scrap yards and impossible storms. Her people come from Anytown, USA, and that’s what makes them so likeable: you feel like as if they’re from your very own town. At the same time, her characters are terrifying: girls who shoot up in front of their babies and men who hit their spouses in a packed bar. Her stories are car wrecks: you can’t tear your eyes away from them.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Set: Bonnie Jo Campbell at Kalamazoo Public Library | Flickr
Set in rural Michigan, where wildlife, jobs, and ways of life are vanishing, the rowdy stories and complex characters in Bonnie Jo Campbell's American Salvage illustrate the desperation of post-industrial America. Campbell visited KPL Central Library on August 5, 2009, where she read from American Salvage, answered questions, and signed copies of her books.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
American Salvage | Kalamazoo Public Library
American Salvage is thoroughly Michigan. Campbell’s stories are set in and around her Comstock stomping ground. The book’s cover art is a moody photograph by Kalamazoo artist Mary Whalen portending that something bad may be about to happen.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
American Salvage by Bonnie Jo Campbell | Advent Book Blog
Rough, amusing and devastating stories. And by rough, I mean these rural characters, original yet familiar, struggling to salvage themselves, and not Campbell’s writing, which is refined and accurate and wonderful.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
American Salvage is Written with Unsettling Grace | PBS-WOSU
Like Donald Ray Pollock writing about southern Ohio and Carolyn Chute writing about Maine, Campbell claims thematic residency in a regional poor, working class setting of Michigan. Her characters are foundry employees, deer hunters and junkyard workers. Indeed, they are hard-pressed people who struggle to love one another, especially when methamphetamine is involved.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Discoveries: American Salvage, Bonnie Jo Campbell | Los Angeles Times
These stories are set in the meth world, which, more and more, seems to have its own landscape, economy and culture, even in literature. In these stories, this world is broken down into salvage and reinvented from the scraps.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campell's 'American Salvage' characters are agonizingly human | Kalamazoo Gazette
The folks who populate Bonnie Jo Campbell's collection of short stories, titled "American Salvage," are a downtrodden group. The men, in particular, are incapable of pulling themselves out of the morass of their own lives. They barely have two nickels to rub together, are in doomed relationships and are accident prone.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
American Salvage by Bonnie Jo Campbell | Time Out Chicago
Worlds collide in Campbell’s second short-story collection, part of the Made in Michigan Writers Series. Which made us wonder: Who knew Michigan had so many worlds?
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campbell's American Salvage | Sycamore Review
This is what makes American Salvage such an impressive work: It’s a quick read, but packs in enough emotional gravity to satisfy even the most serious readers.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Review of Bonnie Jo Campbell's "American Salvage" | Chicago Literary Scene Examiner
I haven’t read her award-winning debut collection Women and Other Animals or her lauded novel Q Road, but American Salvage has such polished prose that it seems as if I didn’t get the full experience of Campbell’s obvious talent. It might’ve been because the subject matter was overwhelmingly limited to hardscrabble men or that she evokes lives that aren’t noticed unless there’s a tragedy or it’s campaign season. The effect of American Salvage, which just went into its third printing and has only been out for three months, is that Campbell’s Michigan lingers and cannot be ignored nor forgotten.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campbell, National Book Award finalist in fiction | Chicago Reader
Her new short-story collection, American Salvage, is filled with characters who could only dream of a life as wide-ranging as her own. In rural Michigan, where most of the 14 stories are set, families settle feuds with guns, and faith in Jesus is the ultimate Y2K survival tool. Dope and 40-ouncers are shared along with tales of missing fathers, and 'tipping the bartender and being polite and paying child support' holds lives and communities together. In one gut punch of a story, a man considers ways to deal with his drug addict wife: 'Solution #2: Wait until Connie comes back from the "store," distract her with the baby, and then cut her meth with Drano, so that when she shoots it up, she dies.' Yet Campbell renders her characters with great compassion, not pity."
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
From fiction to non-fiction, here are the Plain Dealer's 20 best books of 2009 | Cleveland Plain Dealer
These 14 gritty stories are a revelation, funny and risky, often marinated in meth and alcohol abuse. The weather is punishing, the characters working-class, the trucks hard-used, and the money tight. But instead of a country song, Campbell has plucked literature from her rural Michigan surroundings. "Yard Man" will roll you into a fist, and "The Trespasser" does more in 13 paragraphs than many a novel accomplishes in 300 pages.
campbell  holiday09 
december 2009 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campbell's 'American Salvage' | Cleveland Plain Dealer
Bonnie Jo Campbell's 'American Salvage' will rattle your bones in 14 collected stories that form one of the best books of the year.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Bonnie Jo Campbell's American Salvage | 360 Main Street
I came away from reading American Salvage not only thinking about its literary beauty, but looking at people differently, thinking about their lives, pondering how writing about such damaged, luminous fictional characters can engender, if only momentarily, empathy and compassion, an altered way of seeing. No matter who wins the National Book Award, I hope the nomination brings in readers from not only Michigan but every other state; it's a powerful evocation of how so many of our fellow humans are living now. It’s a book to take to heart.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
American Salvage delves into lonely, modern working-class small-town Michigan life | Chicago Tribune
In these stories about cold, lonely, meth-drenched, working-class Michigan life, there’s a certain beauty reaching something like the sublimity of a D.H. Lawrence story. Few of the stories have endings that seem resolved. Because of their despairing feel, and their shape and form, they seem quite lifelike.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Tales Of Michigan Full Of Despair, Life | NPR
In her new short-story collection, American Salvage, Bonnie Jo Campbell looks at working-class life in Michigan. Reviewer Alan Cheuse says both roughness and beauty can be found in Campbell's stories about cold, meth-drenched small towns.
campbell 
december 2009 by since1923
Salvage Artist: The Rumpus Original Combo With Bonnie Jo Campbell | The Rumpus
To an outsider, Bonnie Jo Campbell’s life might seem full of surprises. Once upon a time, she was a circus worker; later, she was a contender for a Ph.D. in Mathematics. She holds rank of nidan, second degree black belt, in kobudo, the art of Okinawan weapons. And she writes. As the author of a previous collection of stories, Women & Other Animals, and the novel Q Road, she’s won a Pushcart Prize, the AWP Award for Short Fiction, and the Southern Review’s 2008 Eudora Welty Prize for “The Inventor, 1972,” a story in her second collection, the 2009 National Book Award-nominated American Salvage.
campbell 
november 2009 by since1923
National Book Award Finalist’s Editor Shares Dirt on Bonnie Jo Campbell’s American Salvage | American Short Fiction blog
Interested in how American Salvage came to be, I followed Campbell’s exceptional path—to WSU Press (where I got my start in editing as an undergrad, oh, a while ago) where I spoke with editor Annie Martin. She handles the press’s Made in Michigan Writers Series and she therefore handled American Salvage, from its first exciting discovery about two years ago to the NBA announcement three weeks ago. Martin talks about, among other things, the big news, the book’s title and content changes, and some specific moments in Campbell’s stories that haunt her.
campbell 
november 2009 by since1923

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