shaunkoh + ifttt   3199

Crazy Smart: When A Rocker Designs A Mars Lander : NPR
- But then something happened. As Steltzner tells it, he was on his way home from playing music at a club one night when he became fascinated with the stars, especially the constellation of Orion. "The fact that it was in a different place in the sky at night when I returned home from playing a gig, than it had been when I'd driven out to the gig," he said. "And I had only some vague recollection from my high school time that something was moving with respect to something else, but that was it." As crazy as it sounds, that experience was enough to motivate him to take a physics course at the local community college. That did it. He was hooked. The fog of sex, drugs, and rock and roll lifted. He had to know all about the laws that govern the universe. The rocker wound up with a doctoral degree in engineering physics. "I was totally turned on by this idea of understanding my world," Steltzner said. "Engineering gave me an opportunity to be gainfully employed [and] really understanding my world with these laws and equations that governed it."
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4 days ago by shaunkoh
I’m Daryl Davis, A Black Musician here to Discuss my Reasons For Befriending Numerous KKK Members And Other White Supremacists, KLAN WE TALK? : IAmA
- People make the mistake of forming anti-racist groups that are rendered ineffective from the start because ONLY invite those who share their beliefs to their meetings. * Provide a safe neutral meeting place. * Learn as much as you can about the ideology of a racist or perceived racist in your area. * Invite that person to meet with your group. *VERY IMPORTANT - LISTEN to that person. What is his/her primary concern? Place yourself in their shoes. What would you do to address their concern if it were you? * As questions, but keep calm in the face of their loud, boisterous posture if that is on display, don't combat it with the same *While you are actively learning about someone else, realize that you are passively teaching them about yourself. Be honest and respectful to them, regardless of how offensive you may find them. You can let them know your disagreement but not in an offensive manner. * Don't be afraid to invite someone with a different opinion to your table. If everyone in your group agrees with one another and you shun those who don't agree, how will anything ever change? You are doing nothing more than preaching to the choir. *When two enemies are talking, they are not fighting, they are talking. They may be yelling and screaming and pounding their fist on the table in disagreement to drive home their point, but at least they are talking. It is when the talking ceases, that the ground becomes fertile for violence. So, KEEP THE CONVERSATION GOING.
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7 days ago by shaunkoh
Survey: Canadians are increasingly denying science, climate and vaccines / Boing Boing
- 43% of Canadians believe "science is a matter of opinion," 47% think the science of global warming is "unclear"; 24% of Canadian millennials are anti-vaxxers, all according to a Leger survey of 1,514 Canadians.
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7 days ago by shaunkoh
'Siri, I'm depressed': Apple wants iPhone assistant to become a personal therapist
- Apple is preparing Siri to become iPhone customers’ virtual therapist, according to the International Business Times. The tech company is ideally seeking someone with a psychology background and programming capabilities, according to a job posting from April. “People have serious conversations with Siri,” the description reads. “People talk to Siri about all kinds of things, including when they’re having a stressful day or have something serious on their mind...They turn to Siri in emergencies or when they want guidance on living a healthier life.”
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7 days ago by shaunkoh
Cow catching snowflakes with her tongue : likeus
- Hi there. Studied envs and learned about animal agriculture. This is a male veal calf (females are raised to be milk cows). Not trying to start drama or crush anyones' pleasure watching this gif, but the production of veal calves is one of the most vile things humans do in animal agriculture. This calf's mother was forcibly impregnated so she would produce milk (she will be impregnated every 9-12 months of her life). Within a week of giving birth, this calf was then taken from the mother and placed in this stall. It will remain in this stall for the entirety of its short life. The only time it will leave is on its way to slaughter. This is so its muscle development is retarded, producing more tender meat for consumption. Ive never visited one of these operations, but Ive been told that they're filled with calves crying out for their mothers for weeks on end. Glad this one got to play in the snow!
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10 days ago by shaunkoh
The Most Important Apple Executive You’ve Never Heard Of
Can't believe I didn't see this last year. - Qualcomm, then as now the biggest designer of phone chips, made the expensive decision to scrap development of its 32-bit chips and put all its resources into catching up. Handset companies all “wanted the shiny new thing,” says Ryan Smith, the editor-in-chief of AnandTech, a website that publishes exhaustive reviews of semiconductor designs. “The A7 really turned the world upside down.” Srouji can’t restrain a smile when recalling competitors’ reactions to Apple’s 64-bit surprise. “When we pick something,” he says, “it’s because we think there’s a problem that nobody can do, or there is some idea that’s so unique and differentiating that the best way to do it is you have to do it yourself.”
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10 days ago by shaunkoh
The inside story of 'brain' of the iPhone X: the A11 Bionic chip
Remarkable work. Also, warning – autoplay videos suck. - Over the course of a decade, Apple’s made remarkable progress in silicon, going from a 65-nanometer process to, now, 10, and from roughly 100 million transistors to 4.31 billion. Even Srouji marvels at the feat. “Doing this year over year and pushing complexity to the limit... I believe we have a world-class team.”
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10 days ago by shaunkoh
Two Ex-Googlers Want To Make Bodegas And Mom-And-Pop Corner Stores Obsolete
- First, all they’ve done is make a fancy vending machine. That’s great. Vending machines are a real thing, and maybe there’s a market for better ones. But better vending machines are still just vending machines. Second, what kind of sociopaths are these people that they want to put mom-and-pop corner stores and bodegas out of business? Local family-owned stores are what make for great neighborhoods. They’re good people running good businesses that people love. Good startup ideas are things that replace products or services that people hate. Taxis suck, for example. That’s why ride sharing services are so popular and successful. Bodegas and corner stores are great. Third, as Helen Rosner argues in this thread, they’ve got a crummy business model. Fuck these guys.
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12 days ago by shaunkoh
reddit.com: over 18?
- The symbol for division (÷) is just a blank fraction with dots replacing the numbers. I learned this about a week ago and i'm still wondering how I never noticed.
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14 days ago by shaunkoh
Life After the Storm: Children Who Survived Katrina Offer Lessons - The New York Times
- In the years after Katrina, a pair of sociologists, Alice Fothergill and Lori Peek, made regular trips to New Orleans, interviewing hundreds of people who had been hit hard and tracking their lives over time, checking in repeatedly. After seven years, the pair identified a rough pattern among displaced children: some had not regained their footing, losing years of schooling and later sinking into unemployment; others adapted, even thrived; and there was a third group, of young people in an uncertain holding pattern, keeping themselves upright but unsteadily, managing lingering effects, like depression or anxiety. Those in the first group tended to have few resources to start with, and lost them all. “It’s a cumulative vulnerability, in which for instance the family struggled before the storm, then could not get out, and the child lost the fragile supports he or she had,” said Dr. Fothergill, a professor at the University of Vermont. Dr. Peek, a professor at the University of Colorado, said that those children who adapted fastest typically had family and networks with resources that held together through Katrina, or acquired strong allies along the way: teachers, pastors, shelter workers who fought for help on the child’s behalf. The third group – “fluctuating equilibrium,” the sociologists called it – usually had lost virtually everything but had one solid anchor: a mother, a father, a teacher, an older sibling.
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17 days ago by shaunkoh
How Blockchain Is Kickstarting the Financial Lives of Refugees - MIT Technology Review
- In Finland, a MONI card can help address several challenges facing asylum seekers, says Jouko Salonen, director of the Finnish Immigration Service. Most importantly, a MONI account functions like a bank account, removing a major barrier to gaining employment. People can use their accounts to buy things, pay bills, and even receive direct deposits from employers. Meanwhile, every transaction is recorded in a public, virtually incorruptible database maintained by a decentralized global network of computers. That enables the Immigration Service to keep track of the cardholders and their spending. The technology helps unbanked asylum seekers advance because what is typically keeping them from getting bank accounts and jobs is that they are missing a form of strongly authenticated identity, says Salonen. “We have found a way to solve that.” MONI’s technology uses one of a number of public blockchains as the means of transferring value—but in a way that to the users seems like using a debit card. A cardholder can pay for things at Mastercard terminals, or enter a number into a Web form to make payments online. MONI takes care of the cryptographic handshake necessary to execute the digital currency transaction as well as the conversion from digital currency back to fiat currency.
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17 days ago by shaunkoh
Redefine statistical significance | Hacker News
- >For a wide range of common statistical tests, transitioning from a P value threshold of α = 0.05 to α = 0.005 while maintaining 80% power would require an increase in sample sizes of about 70%. This proposal is a great pragmatic step forward. Like they say in the paper, it doesn't solve all problems, but it would be an improvement with reasonable cost and tremendous benefits. >Such an increase means that fewer studies can be conducted using current experimental designs and budgets. But Fig. 2 shows the benefit: false positive rates would typically fall by factors greater than two. Hence, considerable resources would be saved by not performing future studies based on false premises.
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17 days ago by shaunkoh
Why WeWork Thinks It's Worth $20 Billion | WIRED
Anyone familiar with WeWork in real life? This piece is positively glowing. - “Nothing about this environment is accidental. “When people walk through our doors, they say, ‘There’s something about the energy here,” says Dina Berrada, a product manager for community operations. An Amazon alumna, she looks after the systems and tools the company uses to operate and grow its products. One of Berrada’s teams is building the software tools that allow community managers at each location to create those seamless experiences. So, when a member walks into a WeWork, a community manager may get an alert to wish them happy birthday. Berrada mentions a newly launched feature that allows community managers to keep notes on members’ preferences. So, if a member mentions a whiskey she likes, she may find a bottle on her desk if she has reason to celebrate.” This Is Why WeWork Thinks It's Worth $20 Billion | Backchannel via Instapaper
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17 days ago by shaunkoh
What the Hell Is an Initial Coin Offering? - MIT Technology Review
- Some people think ICOs could lead to new, exotic ways of building a company. If a cloud storage outfit like Filecoin were to suddenly skyrocket in popularity, for example, it would enrich anyone who holds or mines the token, rather than a set group of the company’s executives and employees. This would be a “decentralized” enterprise, says Peter Van Valkenburgh, director of research at Coin Center, a nonprofit research and advocacy group focused on policy issues surrounding blockchain technology. Someone has to build the blockchain, issue the tokens, and maintain some software, though. So to kickstart a new operation, entrepreneurs can pre-allocate tokens for themselves and their developers. And they can use ICOs to sell tokens to people interested in using the new service when it launches, or in speculating as to the future value of the service. If the value of the tokens goes up, everybody wins. With all the hype around Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, demand has been extremely high for some of the tokens hitting the market lately. A small sampling of the projects that have raised millions via ICOs recently includes a Web browser aimed at eliminating intermediaries in digital advertising, a decentralized prediction market, and a blockchain-based marketplace for insurers and insurance brokers.
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17 days ago by shaunkoh
Automation May Be Creating Jobs—in Retail, at Least - MIT Technology Review
Hunch. These fulfilment jobs, whilst very real, are merely placeholders – the role of item picker is ripe for automation too. - But according to a new analysis by the Progressive Policy Institute, those figures miss the point. If you actually include all the fulfillment-center jobs that e-tail has created, which wouldn't have otherwise needed to exist, the figure rises from 126,000 to 400,000, far outweighing physical-store losses. And those fulfillment-center jobs also pay on average 31 percent more than brick-and-mortar store jobs would in the same county. The Wall Street Journal has a nice piece based on the new report, which tries to get to the bottom of a thorny question: if e-commerce firms like Amazon have made their employees more productive through use of automation, how come they've also increased the total number of retail jobs and even managed to pay people better? Here's its best stab: E-commerce doesn’t simply sell the same product as a store at a lower price. It enables customers to peruse a vast array of products and select precisely the one they want and have it delivered in a day or two, saving the time, cost, and inconvenience of visiting multiple stores ... E-commerce results in people consuming more retail services, once you adjust for this improved quality, than in the pre-online era.
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17 days ago by shaunkoh
A Nobel Peace Prize winner is standing idly by as her country moves closer to genocide - Vox
Horrific. - A report issued by the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in February of this year revealed the extent of the brutality experienced by the Rohingya in the aftermath of the fall 2016 crackdown. In 204 interviews with Rohingya refugees, details emerged about mass gang rapes and indiscriminate killings — including of children. Of 101 women interviewed, more than half had been raped. The army, according to refugee reports, deliberately set fire to homes, schools, and buildings, sometimes forcing members of the community into the burning structures. Especially revolting were the accounts of children – including an eight-month old, a five-year-old and a six-year-old – who were slaughtered with knives. One mother recounted how her five-year-old daughter was trying to protect her from rape when a man “took out a long knife and killed her by slitting her throat.” In another case, an eight-month-old baby was reportedly killed while his mother was gang-raped by five security officers.
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18 days ago by shaunkoh
Into the Black: A Short Fiction Contest With a Big Prize
EXCITING! Shall we do a little brainstorming salon again? - The future of work has never seemed so uncertain. Automation is knocking on the door and already too many Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, unable to meet their monthly expenses and unable to envision a different fate for themselves. The Economic Security Project is looking for new, bold ways to bring all Americans into a place of economic stability; out of the red and into the black. To do this, we are launching a short story contest like no other — one that uses speculative fiction as a tool to imagine a future of economic security and rewards the winner with financial stability of their own. What might a world look like where all of our most basic needs are met? In 5,000 words or less, we want you to explore the impacts of a basic income on individual lives and on society at large. To be clear, we are not expecting you to draft economic policy, but hope to ignite debate around new economies with stories that offer nuanced critique and evidence of impact. Writers may want to address how this economic policy could shift relationships of power, or if economic liberation is even possible without first addressing racial and gender justice. Writers may consider universality (i.e., whether this benefit applies to everyone), investigate the community impact, and even give this economic idea a new name. The most compelling story will change hearts and minds, and ultimately the life of the author; the grand prize winner will receive a basic income of $12,000 over the next year.
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19 days ago by shaunkoh
Obama Foundation Fellowship
I'm not quite sure I'm there yet — but this may interest many of you! - At a tipping point in their work Successful applicants have already demonstrated meaningful impact in their communities, gaining recognition among their peers for their contributions. Now, they stand at a breakthrough moment in their careers. They’re poised to use the Fellowship to significantly advance their work, perhaps by launching new platforms, expanding to broader audiences, or taking their work to a national or global stage. If you’ve already gained global recognition for your work or if your civic innovation work has just begun, you may not be the ideal candidate for this program. Talented, but not connected We are committed to expanding the circle of opportunity to include new and varied voices. Thus we have a strong preference for civic innovators who are not currently connected to the networks and resources they need to advance their work. If you’re not sure whether you fit this description, feel free to apply — and make sure to articulate how the resources of the Fellowship would uniquely impact your work.
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19 days ago by shaunkoh
The Tiny Country that Feeds the World | MetaFilter
Fucking audacious. (Pardon the language) - "The global average yield of potatoes per acre is about nine tons. Van den Borne's fields reliably produce more than 20. That copious output is made all the more remarkable by the other side of the balance sheet: inputs. Almost two decades ago, the Dutch made a national commitment to sustainable agriculture under the rallying cry "Twice as much food using half as many resources."
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20 days ago by shaunkoh
Successful and Schizophrenic - The New York Times
Amazing piece. Read the whole thing. - THIRTY years ago, I was given a diagnosis of schizophrenia. My prognosis was “grave”: I would never live independently, hold a job, find a loving partner, get married. My home would be a board-and-care facility, my days spent watching TV in a day room with other people debilitated by mental illness. I would work at menial jobs when my symptoms were quiet. Following my last psychiatric hospitalization at the age of 28, I was encouraged by a doctor to work as a cashier making change. If I could handle that, I was told, we would reassess my ability to hold a more demanding position, perhaps even something full-time. Then I made a decision. I would write the narrative of my life. Today I am a chaired professor at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law. I have an adjunct appointment in the department of psychiatry at the medical school of the University of California, San Diego, and am on the faculty of the New Center for Psychoanalysis. The MacArthur Foundation gave me a genius grant.
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20 days ago by shaunkoh
We chose cochlear implants for our infant son against our community's beliefs. : IAmA
- It's a bit of "we don't need to be fixed". It's also that they fear that technology will wipe out the future need for ASL. My BIL is still against CIs but once we made amends he actually considered hearing aids. He's not a candidate for either though. My MIL ended up getting a hearing aid after not wearing one for 20 years. She did it for my son, which I love. The internal piece is meant to last decades but if it fails then it would need to be replaced. The external piece( processor) is replaced about every 5 years. He would get the latest version.
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20 days ago by shaunkoh
Is a single Elephant's skin cell bigger than a human's skin cell? : askscience
Cancer as an adaptation that selects against energy dissipation? What a morbid but fascinating hypothesis. - No, while cells can come in various sizes there's something called the Square-Cube law that basically means that the larger an object becomes, its volume grows faster than its surface area. This might sound obvious but because cells have to traffic things into and out of their surfaces in order to process nutrients, the ability to transport becomes a limiting factor as the cells can no longer uptake fuel and get rid of waste fast enough. Bacterial cells are tiny and lack sophisticated transport mechanisms within their cell, they tend to stay small because a lot of their molecular transportation is passive in some way. Eukaryotic cells get around this by having organelles, so they have become more efficient at utilizing resources and as a result, can be bigger. However, eukaryotic cells in general also have an upper limit to size. You might notice that this is the reason why some organelles and cells will become wrinkled heavily (like mitochondria, or even organs like the brain) and that's to increase their surface area to volume ratio. Elephants get around this limitation by simply just having more cells. ... To add to this, you would think that, if any cell has a given probability of becoming cancerous, the larger the animal is, the more likely it would be to get cancer. However, this is empirically false. It's called Peto's Paradox. No one is quite sure why that happens, but some interesting hypotheses I've seen is that whale tumors grow their own tumors and die; and that cancer is an adaptation that selects against energy dissipation, i.e. it's not a disease per se but more like the sickle cell mutation: disadvantageous in general but protective in areas with malaria.
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21 days ago by shaunkoh
In Silicon Valley, Working 9 to 5 Is for Losers - The New York Times
- But for some, “hustle” is just a euphemism for extreme workaholism. Gary Vaynerchuk, a.k.a. Gary Vee, an entrepreneur and angel investor who has 1.5 million Twitter followers and a string of best-selling books with titles like “Crush It!,” tells his acolytes they should be working 18 hours a day. Every day. No vacations, no going on dates, no watching TV. “If you want bling bling, if you want to buy the jets?” he asks in one of his motivational speeches. “Work. That’s how you get it.” Mr. Vaynerchuk is also a judge on Apple’s “Planet of the Apps,” a reality show where app developers compete to win funding from a venture capital firm. A recent promo depicted a contestant alongside this quotation: “I rarely get to see my kids. That’s a risk you have to take.” The show’s promotional tweet added: “For the ultimate reward, he’ll put everything on the line.” Good grief. The guy is developing an app that lets you visualize how a coffee table from a catalog might look in your living room. I suppose that’s cool, but is it really more important than seeing your kids? Is the chance to raise some venture-capital funding really “the ultimate reward”? (Apple pulled the promo after a wave of critical comments on Twitter.)
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21 days ago by shaunkoh
Missing volunteer pulled from Cypress Creek - Houston Chronicle
- Alonso Guillen was a recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which temporarily lifted the threat of deportation for immigrants brought to the U.S. before they were 16, family members said. His father is a lawful permanent, but his mother is still in the application process for legal status. Reached at her home in Piedras Negras, Mexico, across the border from Eagle Pass, Rita Ruiz de Guillen, 62, said she is heartbroken. "I've lost a great son, you have no idea," she said, weeping softly. "I'm asking God to give me strength." She said she hoped U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials would take pity and grant her a humanitarian visa so that she could come to Houston and bury her son, but she was turned back at the border. "When we are with God, there are no borders," she said. "Man made borders on this earth."
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21 days ago by shaunkoh
The expert who helped write the mental disorders manual explains why Trump doesn’t have one - The Verge
- And you think that even if he did “officially” have it, it wouldn’t make a difference. This argument that NPD should disqualify Trump from presidency doesn’t make sense. First, he doesn’t have it. And even if he did, so what? Narcissism is very common in political leaders, celebrities, doctors, lawyers, and professors, but it’s not a disqualifying criteria for governing. Even if people have mental disorders, that doesn’t mean they can’t be great leaders. We don’t want that idea. Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill both had very severe mental disorders and were among the best leaders. The decision to keep someone as a leader should be based not on psychiatric name-calling but rather on the person’s behaviors and adherence to the Constitution and confidence as a leader. He should be impeached of his behavior and because he’s a terrible president, not because he supposedly has a mental illness.
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21 days ago by shaunkoh
Weaponizing ridicule | MetaFilter
- The military seems to me, though, like one of the worst institutions to deploy ridicule as a weapon. There's a reason that it's artists and women and teenagers who are the most devastating deployers of ridicule: Ridicule works best when it's the weak undermining the strong. Somehow I don't think that NATO generals making fun of the Admiral Kuznetsov or drawing Putin in drag would've worked out the way he might've hoped.
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21 days ago by shaunkoh
Where will artificial general intelligence come from? | Hacker News
- The basic argument was that people are comically inadequate at writing complex code. You can't write the code to detect a cat in an image and the correct thing to do is to give up, write down an objective that measures the desiderata and pay with compute to search a function space for solutions. In the same vain, the idea of writing an AGI and all of its cognitive machinery is preposterous and the correct thing to do is to give up, think about the objective and search the program space for solutions. Unfortunately, the mindset of decomposition by function (see Brooks ref), which has worked so well for us in so many areas of scientific inquiry, is just about the most misleading mindset when it comes to AGI.
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22 days ago by shaunkoh
We Can’t Stop Checking the News Either. Welcome to the New FOMO | WIRED
- “We scroll through our Twitter feeds, not seeking anything specific, just monitoring them so we don’t miss out on anything important,” says Shyam Sundar, a communications researcher at Pennsylvania State University. This impulse could stem from the chemical hits our brains receive with each news hit, but it could also derive from a primitive behavioral instinct—surveillance gratification-seeking, or the urge that drove our cave-dwelling ancestors to poke their heads out and check for predators.
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22 days ago by shaunkoh
Python Data Science Handbook | Hacker News
Anyone doing a Python Data Science book club? - We're using this book for a "book club" at work. Doing 1 chapter every 2 weeks. Chapter 1 covers Jupyter, 2 covers numpy, 3 pandas, 4 matplotlib, and 5 machine learning. We just made it through the first 4 chapters and it lays a good foundation for those libraries. I suspect chapter 5 is the meatiest and most interesting chapter, which covers scikit-learn and machine learning techniques. It is a long chapter so we will spend a month on it. I recommend combining this book with McKinney's Pandas book[1] and the author's excellent YouTube presentations at PyCon and PyData. Start with "Statistics for Hackers"[2] by Jake VanderPlas and then look for his others. [1]: http://ift.tt/2ee6Q0X [2]: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq9DzN6mvYA
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22 days ago by shaunkoh
To Understand Rising Inequality, Consider the Janitors at Two Top Companies, Then and Now - The New York Times
One of the most humbling pieces I've read recently. Absolutely must read. - Yet the biggest difference between their two experiences is in the opportunities they created. A manager learned that Ms. Evans was taking computer classes while she was working as a janitor and asked her to teach some other employees how to use spreadsheet software to track inventory. When she eventually finished her college degree in 1987, she was promoted to a professional-track job in information technology. Less than a decade later, Ms. Evans was chief technology officer of the whole company, and she has had a long career since as a senior executive at other top companies. Ms. Ramos sees the only advancement possibility as becoming a team leader keeping tabs on a few other janitors, which pays an extra 50 cents an hour. They both spent a lot of time cleaning floors. The difference is, for Ms. Ramos, that work is also a ceiling.
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22 days ago by shaunkoh
How to Regulate Artificial Intelligence - The New York Times
- I propose three rules for artificial intelligence systems that are inspired by, yet develop further, the “three laws of robotics” that the writer Isaac Asimov introduced in 1942: A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm; a robot must obey the orders given it by human beings, except when such orders would conflict with the previous law; and a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the previous two laws. These three laws are elegant but ambiguous: What, exactly, constitutes harm when it comes to A.I.? I suggest a more concrete basis for avoiding A.I. harm, based on three rules of my own.
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22 days ago by shaunkoh
Why Apple and Intel don’t want to see the conflict minerals rule rolled back - The Washington Post
- But in a surprising move, several major companies say they will not abandon the standard even if the law is gutted. While corporations normally cheer in unison when regulations are cut, this controversial rule has prompted a different reaction. That is because something interesting has happened since the law took effect: Companies say the conflict minerals law has created an expectation both inside their corporate headquarters and among consumers that their products will be “conflict-free.” They do not want to back away from that now. But they worry their efforts will be undermined without the law to support them. “We do this because it’s the right thing to do,” Apple said in a statement about its conflict minerals compliance. The tech giant said it plans to keep those protections “regardless of whether or not the law requires it.” Apple said it is pleading its case behind the scenes to White House and SEC officials. Intel said it, too, was committed to “responsible sourcing of minerals” regardless of regulatory changes. “We do actually believe in doing the right thing,” Intel spokesman William Moss said.
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24 days ago by shaunkoh
Fox News Poll: Voters' mood sours, 56 percent say Trump tearing country apart | Fox News
- Many will find this jarring: When asked who poses a greater threat to the United States, nearly as many say the media (40 percent) as say white supremacists (47 percent). Another nine percent say that the threat is “the same.” Most Trump voters (75 percent) say the news media are the bigger threat. Most Hillary Clinton backers (80 percent) say white supremacists.
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25 days ago by shaunkoh
Game of Thrones season 7: each character's strategy, ranked by political science - Vox
I love pop culture used as a lens to understand the real world. More please!
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27 days ago by shaunkoh
Hurricane Harvey and the Urgency of Flood Prevention Tactics - CityLab
- How quickly we seem to be lapsing back into the careless, won’t-happen-here attitude that turned Katrina, a storm that was only mid-sized at landfall, into a lethal catastrophe. After that ordeal, vigilance was declared a civic responsibility. Katrina had shamed government leadership at several levels, not just in the Bush White House, and we citizens bore a good bit of responsibility ourselves. Achieving “resilience”—a favorite buzzword of various foundations that came down here after Katrina to save us from ourselves—has become a call to arms, albeit a sometimes vague and empty one. But after a dozen years and billions of dollars spent shoring up New Orleans’s flood defenses, we are not resilient. Get with it, New Orleans. And the same scolding can be extended to the Texas officials who failed to work out coordinated messaging on evacuation.
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27 days ago by shaunkoh
Joe Biden Addresses Charlottesville and Its Aftermath - The Atlantic
<3 - The greatness of America is that—not always at first, and sometimes at enormous pain and cost—we have always met Lincoln’s challenge to embrace the “better angels of our nature.” Our history is proof of what King said—the long arc of history does “bend towards justice.” A week after Charlottesville, in Boston, we saw the truth of America: Those with the courage to oppose hate far outnumber those who promote it.
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29 days ago by shaunkoh
The US is good at responding to flood damage. We’re terrible at mitigating it. - Vox
- We’re good at disaster response. We’re terrible at disaster mitigation. The irony of the situation is that the federal government pours billions into repairs for houses that are probably going to flood again, said Moore and Larson. The United States spends about $300 billion responding to natural disasters like Hurricane Harvey. In contrast, we only spend about $600 million on mitigation — improving buildings so they won’t flood when the next storm comes. This is despite the fact that mitigation has a 4-1 payback, Larson said. The problem is that people often don’t want to spend money up front to protect their house or business, and then get caught up in a cycle of rebuilding.
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29 days ago by shaunkoh
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Provocative. - Comment: "Your article reminds me that we put a man on the moon before we thought of putting wheels on suitcases."
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Walk this way | The Outline
- Walking is an activity through which the haves are separated from the have-nots. There are the walkers of leisure and the walkers of necessity, who walk to survive, because there is no other way for them to move. All across the world people walk. They walk in cities not designed for those without means. They walk not as a hobby, or to keep fit, or to save the environment, or to think. They walk out of necessity. While walkers of leisure may strive to escape humanity, “indentured” walkers seek it out; for trade, for food, for communication, for life. The essayist Edward Abbey once described walking as “... the only form of transportation in which a man proceeds erect — like a man — on his own legs," forgetting that the walker of necessity is often slumped, tired, searching for satisfaction at the destination, rather than from the act of walking itself. In much of the world, this walking for survival remains something of a national pastime, with the people who need it most often ill-served by the hand of the state. In Botswana's barren Tuli Block game reserve, I watched workers hitchhike from the side of the road after work, surrounded by a wilderness of lions, elephants, hyenas, and leopards. Across the border in South Africa, I witnessed how a lack of infrastructure makes the process of walking uniquely dangerous. The same scene played on repeat in villages dotted all over the country; groups of men, women and children wandering the roads day and night, often without any source of light save for the headlights of the cars speeding by as darkness fell. The lack of streetlights, crosswalks, and sidewalks make the very process of walking hazardous, with pedestrians accounting for a large proportion of road deaths in the country. This situation is acknowledged by alcohol labeling that sometimes features a unique warning: “Don’t Drink and Walk on the Road, You May Be Killed.”
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Defenders finds a powerful scene in Luke Cage explaining white privilege to Iron Fist - Polygon
A remarkable scene in an otherwise ok tv show. Absolutely got my attention. - [SPOILERS] “I know privilege when I see it,” Cage tells Rand after a heated debate about rights and wrongs. “You may think that you earned your strength, but you had power the day you were born. Before the dragons, before the chi ... you have the ability to change the world without getting anyone hurt.” When Rand responds that Madame Gao and her assassin collective won’t be stopped that way, Cage reminds him that by enacting war on those who have nowhere else to turn isn’t the answer either. “I’d think twice about trying to use that thing on people who were trying to feed their families,” Cage says, referring to Rand’s powerful, glowing fist. It’s the first of many scenes in which Cage and Rand are at odds, but it does a good job of showcasing the two worlds the heroes come from. Rand, born into the wealthy, New York elite, and Cage, a longtime resident of Harlem, may have grown up a few miles apart, but had very different lives.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Our Broken Economy, in One Simple Chart - The New York Times
Economist friends - how should one interpret this graph? - The message is straightforward. Only a few decades ago, the middle class and the poor weren’t just receiving healthy raises. Their take-home pay was rising even more rapidly, in percentage terms, than the pay of the rich. The post-inflation, after-tax raises that were typical for the middle class during the pre-1980 period — about 2 percent a year — translate into rapid gains in living standards. At that rate, a household’s income almost doubles every 34 years. (The economists used 34-year windows to stay consistent with their original chart, which covered 1980 through 2014.) In recent decades, by contrast, only very affluent families — those in roughly the top 1/40th of the income distribution — have received such large raises. Yes, the upper-middle class has done better than the middle class or the poor, but the huge gaps are between the super-rich and everyone else. The basic problem is that most families used to receive something approaching their fair share of economic growth, and they don’t anymore.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Alleged Boston Antifa Thanks Hillary Clinton, Democrats for Their Support as They Burn American Flag
We just don't have the tools to deal with this: verifiying every emerging article in our networks —especially ones that speak to our existing bias and fears, validating whatever narrative we're primed to receive. I've got work to do. - Liam Stack @liamstack Guy fired from BuzzFeed for plagiarism based a whole antifa story on a Twitter account he didn't try to verify
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Dick Gregory, 84, Dies; Found Humor in the Civil Rights Struggle - The New York Times
Boy, what a life. Read the whole thing. It's a reminder that a live fully lived can have a life of its own in so many other hearts and minds that follow. - Mr. Gregory was a breakthrough performer in his appeal to whites — a crossover star, in contrast to veteran black comedians like Redd Foxx, Moms Mabley and Slappy White, whose earthy, pungent humor was mainly confined to black clubs on the so-called chitlin circuit. Though he clearly seethed over the repression of blacks, he resorted to neither scoldings nor lectures when playing big-time rooms like the Hungry I in San Francisco or the Village Gate in New York. Rather, he won audiences over with wry observations about the country’s racial chasm. He would plant himself on a stool, the picture of insouciance in a three-button suit and dark tie, dragging slowly on a cigarette, which he used as a punctuation mark. From that perch he would bid America to look in the mirror, and to laugh at itself. “Segregation is not all bad,” he would say. “Have you ever heard of a collision where the people in the back of the bus got hurt?” Or: “You know the definition of a Southern moderate? That’s a cat that’ll lynch you from a low tree.” Or: “I heard we’ve got lots of black astronauts. Saving them for the first spaceflight to the sun.” Some lines became classics, like the one about a restaurant waitress in the segregated South who told him, “We don’t serve colored people here,” to which Mr. Gregory replied: “That’s all right, I don’t eat colored people. Just bring me a whole fried chicken.” Lunch-counter sit-ins, central to the early civil rights protests, did not always work out as planned. “I sat in at a lunch counter for nine months,” he said. “When they finally integrated, they didn’t have what I wanted.”
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Tens of thousands march for unity, overwhelming ‘free speech’ rally - The Boston Globe
I am conflicted. - One small confrontation happened before noon, when a young man wearing a red “Make America Great Again” hat walked through a crowd that met him with loud chants. “Shame!” “Go home!” We don’t want you here” they yelled. “We don’t want any hate here.” ... A short time later, a crowd surrounded another man in a Trump hat and screamed expletives in his face, saying “no one likes you” and chanting “go home!” Imani Williams, a 27-year-old Connecticut woman aligned with the counterprostestors, tried to defend the man as others spit at him, sprayed him with silly string, and blew clouds of vaporizer smoke in his face. “I couldn’t get through a KKK rally with the same treatment,” Williams, who is black, explained a moment later. “But we shouldn’t be like them . . . It’s the right thing to do at the end of the day. We’re all part of the same country. It’s unfortunate what’s happening but the response we should have is to be nonviolent.”
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
TL;DR: Domestic violence is a national security issue - The Washington Post
- TL;DR: Domestic violence is a national security issue Mass shooters and terrorists run the gamut in terms of age, class, race and motivation. But there's one thing nearly all of them have in common: a history of domestic violence.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Right-Wing Extremists Are a Bigger Threat to America Than ISIS
- And although they are frequently dismissed as people with crazy beliefs, right-wing extremists often seem like the guy next door. While experts say many of these individuals are paranoid and narcissistic, with strong anti-democratic tendencies, “the most common trait among terrorists is normalcy,” says Perliger of West Point. What drives them, according to studies, is not so much ideology as their social network. When friends and associates all proclaim that the government is destroying freedom, or that all Muslims are terrorists, or that minorities are dragging down the country, the social pressure to conform with that opinion is intense.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
ELI5: Deadweight vs. liveweight. Why does a 50lb bag of concrete feel heavier than my 50lb kid? : explainlikeimfive
On Reddit you learn something new everyday - What people are missing is the ergonomics of the item. (I'm using that word loosely for the sake of discussion.) If you try to lift a 200lb log into the back of a station wagon Vs. a 200lb dead body, the body will be much harder. As a matter of fact, almost everything is easier to lift than a dead body. This is due to the rigidity of the object. A log, chair, door, table... these things are not fighting you by changing shape and balance/leverage points on the fly. Once you find the leverage points on a couch, it doesn't change. A dead body, on the other hand, is a cornucopia of balance points and weight that redistributes itself randomly at the most inopportune moments. Even with two people, moving it can be a chore. This is why you want to, preferably, wrap them in a thick wrap of shipping plastic, or visqueen and duct tape, or roll them in a thick rug. The main point is to keep the limbs tightly together: The arms straight along either side of the torso, and the legs tightly together at the ankles and just above the knees. This can be done with just duct tape, or a whole lot of zip-ties, but wrapping is really your best bet. Hope this helps with your son.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Jim Carrey is a painter now, and he’s actually really good · Great Job, Internet! · The A.V. Club
- Every great comedian has a bit of darkness in them. Sometimes, it can even feel like the bigger their smile and the more positive their presence, the heavier that darkness truly is. Jim Carrey made a name for himself in both stand-up and film thanks to his silly physical comedy and highly expressive, seemingly rubber face. But, in recent years, the darkness lurking behind Carrey’s outward persona has started to emerge. He’s suffered personal loss, numerous career flops, and has purposefully shied away from the public eye. In a new short-form documentary, “I Needed Color,” fans get a chance to see what Carrey has been up to and, as it turns out, he’s been painting. What’s more, he’s really good at it.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
How to Make Fun of Nazis - The New York Times
Non-violence is a muscle. It makes more intuitive sense to me, than eye-for-an-eye style escalation. - Those I spoke with appreciated the sentiment of the antifa, or anti-fascist, demonstrators who showed up in Charlottesville, members of an anti-racist group with militant and anarchist roots who are willing to fight people they consider fascists. “I would want to punch a Nazi in the nose, too,” Maria Stephan, a program director at the United States Institute of Peace, told me. “But there’s a difference between a therapeutic and strategic response.” The problem, she said, is that violence is simply bad strategy. Violence directed at white nationalists only fuels their narrative of victimhood — of a hounded, soon-to-be-minority who can’t exercise their rights to free speech without getting pummeled. It also probably helps them recruit. And more broadly, if violence against minorities is what you find repugnant in neo-Nazi rhetoric, then “you are using the very force you’re trying to overcome,” Michael Nagler, the founder of the Peace and Conflict Studies program at the University of California, Berkeley, told me.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
'Can't you use GPS?': A train delay, a bus ride gone south and a day to remember - Channel NewsAsia
- It was quite the morning, but I won't be remembering the anger and tension and confusion documented on the ground and over social media. Instead, my one enduring image is what I saw when our shuttle passed three others in the Dhoby Ghaut area: Standing next to each driver, a passenger grasping a mobile phone in one hand while gesturing and giving directions with the other. I won't be forgetting that sight of solidarity any time soon.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
The Actual Voices Of Black Slaves Recorded Now Revealed (1999) - Nightline broadcast of clips of voice recordings made in the mid-twentieth century of black people born into U.S. slavery (8:57) : Documentaries
- Ya really struck me when he said my grandfather "belonged" to Thomas Jefferson. It's one thing to read a statement like that but entirely different to hear it said aloud.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Stan Lee might be the wokest 94-year-old on Earth · Great Job, Internet! · The A.V. Club
- Casual movie-goers may only know Stan Lee as the weird old guy who shows up in every Marvel movie, unaware that the kooky nonagenarian is the kaleidoscopic mind behind the crusaders that have come to dominate modern multiplexes. His past creations aren’t all we should be celebrating him for, however, as Lee remains at the forefront of the comic book industry’s move towards embracing more diverse perspectives, a problem with which it’s long struggled. As a response to the bigotry displayed both in Charlottesville this past weekend and in our own White House since then, Lee shared a column he wrote back in 1968—the year the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. ignited a number of violent protests across the country—that, sadly, remains as relevant today as it was then. Published as part of his “Stan’s Soapbox” column, it emphasizes that “bigotry and racism are among the deadliest social ills plaguing the world today” and that the only way to defeat a bigot is to “expose them—to reveal them for the insidious evils they really are.”
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
What if Western media covered Charlottesville the same way it covers other nations - The Washington Post
- If we talked about what happened in Charlottesville the same way we talk about events in a foreign country, here’s how Western media would cover it: The international community is yet again sounding the alarm on ethnic violence in the United States under the new regime of President Trump. The latest flash point occurred this past weekend when the former Confederate stronghold of Charlottesville descended into chaos following rallies of white supremacist groups protesting the removal of statues celebrating leaders of the defeated Confederate states. The chaos turned deadly when Heather Heyer, a member of the white ethnic majority who attended the rally as a counterprotester, was killed when a man with neo-Nazi sympathies allegedly drove his car into a crowd.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
We tried the new AmazonFresh Pickup service in Seattle, and this is what happened – GeekWire
NTUC + Cold Storage just aren't institutionally structured to take on a competitor like Amazon.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Blanche Blackwell, mistress and muse of James Bond creator Ian Fleming, dies - The Washington Post
- At 95 and nearly blind, Mrs. Blackwell had lost none of her charm. “Not that I should complain,” she said, reaching for a rose. “I’ve had a marvelous life. Do smell my pink rose.”
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
The false equivalency of Trump blaming “many sides” in Charlottesville - Vox
- 7. Music traditions were not coopted and sold for profit from many sides. The constitution didn't count 3/5ths of a person from many sides. — Phillip Atiba Goff (@DrPhilGoff) August 12, 2017 8. Justice frequently does not have many sides. When powerful groups harm less powerful groups, there is not a need for mutual apology. — Phillip Atiba Goff (@DrPhilGoff) August 12, 2017 9. False equivalency is a lie that renders the powerful as victims. And it is a violence to those who are not equal save for that lie. — Phillip Atiba Goff (@DrPhilGoff) August 12, 2017 10. Poverty and exploitation do not have many sides. People did not die in #Charlottesville on many sides. And justice cannot say otherwise. — Phillip Atiba Goff (@DrPhilGoff) August 12, 2017 In short, there aren’t multiple morally equivalent sides here. There’s one side — white supremacists — that has long oppressed all other groups of people. Their protests aim to ensure that oppression continues, even if it means using violence. The people counterprotesting, on the other hand, are trying to end that oppression.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
A roadmap for AI policy questions / Boing Boing
- Robot law pioneer Ryan Calo (previously) has published a "roadmap" for an "artificial intelligence policy...to help policymakers, investors, technologists, scholars, and students understand the contemporary policy environment around AI at least well enough to initiative their own exploration." Calo cites a lot of our favorites, like Cathy O'Neil and Julia Angwin, and neatly breaks down the problems of safety, transparency, fairness, and displacement of workers. Calo isn't offering answers, but rather a comprehensive and well-ordered list of questions that we should be thinking about. Topics covered include: • Justice and equity • Use of force • Safety and certification • Privacy (including data parity); and • Taxation and displacement of labor In addition to these topics, the essay will touch briefly on a selection of broader systemic questions: • Institutional configuration and expertise • Investment and procurement • Removing hurdles to accountability; and • Correcting mental models of AI
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Fired Google engineer compares high-paid tech job to Soviet forced labor - The Verge
- Former Google engineer James Damore, who was fired for distributing a memo suggesting women are not biologically suited for certain types of work, is now branding himself as a brave truth teller. In what appears to be his new Twitter account, Damore can be seen wearing a shirt with the word “Goolag,” a play on “Google” that means to suggest the Silicon Valley search company is something like the infamous Soviet camps where prisoners were worked and starved to death as part of one of the 20th century’s worst genocides. Google, which provides free meals, massages, and fitness classes at its Mountain View, California headquarters, pays engineers like Damore a typical salary of $162,000, according to Glassdoor, not including extra compensation like healthcare benefits, retirement savings, and equity. The company also offers its employees training opportunities, including volunteer sessions on subjects like diversity and unconscious bias. You know, just like a Gulag.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
www.quora.com
Best take on the whole brouhaha. - We do have evidence for some of these to some extent for some gender differences in behavior. That, however, does not imply what the author thinks it does. His implicit model is that cognitive traits must be either biological (i.e. innate, natural, and unchangeable) or non-biological (i.e., learned by a blank slate). This nature versus nurture dichotomy is completely outdated and nobody in the field takes it seriously. Rather, modern research is based on the much more biologically reasonable view that neurological traits develop over time under the simultaneous influence of epigenetic, genetic and environmental influences. Everything about humans involves both nature and nurture.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Woman Killed in Charlottesville Identified As Heather Heyer
Profound. “I don’t want her death to be a focus for more hatred, I want her death to be a rallying cry for justice and equality and fairness and compassion." - Heyer’s mother also gave an interview to Huffington Post’s Andy Campbell in which she celebrated her daughter’s activism and charity, explaining that Heyer was determined to stand up to injustice of any kind and would always reach out to help those less privileged than she was: She always had a very strong sense of right and wrong, she always, even as a child, was very caught up in what she believed to be fair. Somehow I almost feel that this is what she was born to be, is a focal point for change. I’m proud that what she was doing was peaceful, she wasn’t there fighting with people. Bro also shared her heartbreak about Fields, the young man now charged with Heyer’s murder, per Campbell: “I think he’s still very young, and I’m sorry he believed that hate could fix problems. Hate only brings more hate,” Bro said. “Heather was not about hate, Heather was about stopping hatred. Heather was about bringing an end to injustice. She began to cry as she added, “I don’t want her death to be a focus for more hatred, I want her death to be a rallying cry for justice and equality and fairness and compassion. I’m very sorry that [Fields] chose that path because he has now ruined his life as well as robbed a great many of us of someone we love very much.”
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Man Charged After White Nationalist Rally in Charlottesville Ends in Deadly Violence - The New York Times
Why isn't this considered a case of lone wolf domestic terrorism? - Those skirmishes mostly resulted in cuts and bruises. But after the rally at a city park was dispersed, a car bearing Ohio license plates plowed into a crowd near the city’s downtown mall killing a 32-year-old woman. Some 34 others were injured; at least 19 in the car crash, according to a spokeswoman for the University of Virginia Medical Center. Several witnesses and video of the scene suggested that the crash might have been intentional. The police said that the driver was arrested after fleeing the scene and that the case was being treated as a criminal homicide. Col. Martin Kumer, the superintendent of the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail, confirmed Saturday evening that an Ohio man, James Alex Fields Jr., 32, of Maumee, had been arrested and charged with second-degree murder, three counts of malicious wounding and failing to stop at the scene of an accident that resulted in a death. But the authorities declined to say publicly that Mr. Fields was the driver of the car the plowed into the crowd.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
National Rifle Association TV host says his request for North Korea to nuke California was a "joke" / Boing Boing
Do we have a responsibility to *not* signal boost stuff we disagree with? The original tweet was terrible, yes. But it was only retweeted 13 times. After all, outrage helped make an otherwise obscure joke a president. - Grant Stinchfield thought his call for North Korea to incinerate millions of human beings was a real knee-slapper. He's sorry some people didn't find it as funny as he did. “Let's send a note to North Korea that Sacramento changed its name to Guam!," he tweeted.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Dota 2
- We’ve created a bot which beats the world’s top professionals at 1v1 matches of Dota 2 under standard tournament rules. The bot learned the game from scratch by self-play, and does not use imitation learning or tree search. This is a step towards building AI systems which accomplish well-defined goals in messy, complicated situations involving real humans.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
The New Copycats: How Facebook Squashes Competition From Startups - WSJ
"It's free who cares" - Facebook uses an internal database to track rivals, including young startups performing unusually well, people familiar with the system say. The database stems from Facebook’s 2013 acquisition of a Tel Aviv-based startup, Onavo, which had built an app that secures users’ privacy by routing their traffic through private servers. The app gives Facebook an unusually detailed look at what users collectively do on their phones, these people say.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Poll: Half of Republicans would back postponing 2020 election if Trump proposed it | TheHill
This is terrifying. - According to a poll published by The Washington Post, 52 percent of Republicans said they would back a postponement of the next election if Trump called for it. If Trump and congressional Republicans proposed postponing the election to ensure only eligible citizens could vote, support from Republicans rises to 56 percent. Pollsters found 47 percent of Republicans think Trump won the popular vote. A majority of Republicans, 68 percent, also thinks millions of illegal immigrants voted in the presidential election and 73 percent think voter fraud happens somewhat or very often.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Ingrid Goes West, starring Aubrey Plaza as an Instagram addict, is deliciously twisted - Vox
- Ingrid is an addict, and her slide down a slippery slope seems consciously modeled on films about other kinds of addictions. Tellingly, though, no obvious fix exists. You can’t just tell someone to go to rehab because they look at Instagram too much. That kind of hopelessness forms the film’s subtext, though it’s not exactly a critique of Instagram; it’s just reality. For a lot of people, Instagram is a place to escape the pitchforks and hellfire of Twitter and the boneheaded political arguments of Facebook. Many of my friends have called it the “happiest place on the internet.” But not for everyone. In Ingrid Goes West, it feels inevitable from the start that it will all go very badly. Watching Ingrid’s pain as she experiences rejection is excruciating, even if the route toward that point is very funny. But even the movie’s conclusion is wickedly cheeky; admitting you’re not perfect before an audience of thousands of strangers might turn out to be its own form of Instagram perfection, right?
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
New York’s Subways Are Not Just Delayed. Some Trains Don’t Run at All. - The New York Times
- Hacker News: A lot of what affects the NYC subway is the principle of the "Sick System." http://ift.tt/ueBzT3 The system is too essential for a stop-the-world overhaul, but so far gone, that only a stop-the-world overhaul can part the clouds. Without a hard flush of antiquated mission critical infrastructure, millions of turbulent eddies and vortices will ensure that the system is always afflicted by parasitic equipment and debris. http://ift.tt/2wAvgu9
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7 weeks ago by shaunkoh
The Loyal Engineers Steering NASA’s Voyager Probes Across the Universe - The New York Times
- I wasn’t aware of just how narrow the window of opportunity was that made it possible for these probes to visit all four of the outer planets: "One of the greatest obstacles to planetary science has always been the human life span: Typically, for instance, a direct flight to Neptune would take about 30 years. But in the spring of 1965, Gary Flandro, a doctoral student at Caltech, noticed that all four outer planets — Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune — would align on the same side of the sun in the 1980s. If a spacecraft were launched in the mid- to late 1970s, it could use the gravity of the first body to slingshot to the second, and so on. Such a trajectory would add enough speed to shorten the total journey by almost two-thirds. What’s more, this orbital configuration would not appear again for 175 years."
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7 weeks ago by shaunkoh
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