shaunkoh + ifttt   3299

'Black Panther': Erik Killmonger Is a Profound, Tragic Villain - The Atlantic
- Killmonger’s stated purpose, to liberate black people all over the world, has sparked a lively discussion over whether he is a bad guy to begin with. What could be so bad about black liberation? “I fist-pumped in the silent, dark theater when he was laying out his plans,” writes Brooke Obie at Shadow and Act. “IT’S A GOOD IDEA!” That Coogler’s villain has even inspired this debate is a testament to how profound and complex the character is. “In the end, all comes down to a contest between T’Challa and Killmonger that can only be read one way,” writes Christopher Lebron in a well-argued piece in Boston Review, “in a world marked by racism, a man of African nobility must fight his own blood relative whose goal is the global liberation of blacks.” This is not actually what happens in the film. Killmonger’s goal is, in his eyes, the global liberation of black people. But that is not truly his goal, as Coogler makes clear in the text of the script and in Killmonger’s interactions with other characters. Like Magneto, another comic-book character who is a creation of historical trauma—the Holocaust instead of the Middle Passage—Killmonger’s goal is world domination. “The sun will never set on the Wakandan empire,” Killmonger declares, echoing an old saying about the British Empire, to drive the point home as clearly as possible. He sees no future beyond his own reign; he burns the magic herbs Wakandan monarchs use to gain their powers because he does not even intend to have an heir. It is remarkable that many viewers seem to have taken the “liberation” part at face value, and ignored the “empire” part, which Jordan delivers perfectly. They are equally important. Killmonger’s plan for “black liberation,” arming insurgencies all over the world, is an American policy that has backfired and led to unforeseen disasters perhaps every single time it has been deployed; it is somewhat bizarre to see people endorse a comic-book version of George W. Bush’s foreign policy and sign up for the Project for the New Wakandan Century as long as the words “black liberation” are used instead of “democracy promotion.” Killmonger’s assault begins in London, New York, and Hong Kong; China is not typically known as a particularly good example of white Western hegemony in need of overthrow.
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yesterday by shaunkoh
Apple Maps vs. Google Maps vs. Waze – arturrr
- The performance of the three apps sparks a set of questions regarding incentives and business strategy. For Apple, Maps is a basic solution for its average user who wants a maps solution out of the box. Apple Maps does not directly drive ad or subscription revenue for Apple so there is less reason for Apple to incentivize iOS users to use Apple Maps over other solutions. However, Apple does care about user experience, and sandbagging trip time estimates so that users arrive at their destination on time results in a great user experience. Hence, I believe that Apple is intentionally conservative with estimated arrival times. At the other extreme, Waze (Alphabet) makes money through ads when you use their app. What better way to get people to use your navigation app than by over-promising short trip times when no one takes the time to record data and realize that you under-deliver? If an unsuspecting user opens Apple Maps and sees a 34-minute route and compares that to 30-minutes in Waze, the deed is done. Now Waze has a life-long customer who doesn’t realize they’ve been hoodwinked and Waze can throw at them stupidly annoying ads.
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yesterday by shaunkoh
www.washingtonpost.com
- The vulnerability of South Korea’s seniors speaks to a rapid shift in the way this country cares for and thinks about its elderly. For previous generations, there was little need to think about a pension or retirement savings; children were the pension, all but guaranteed to support and often live with their parents as they aged. But in modern-day, achievement-obsessed Korea, that social contract has frayed. A minority of children, compared with 90 percent two decades ago, now think they should take care of their parents. Adult children tend to chase jobs and prosperity in large cities, mostly Seoul, and in rural areas such as Gangwon Province, the region hosting the Olympics, those without familial support depend mostly on measly government pensions — as little as $200 per month. “Because of the weak pension system, retired people have no other way but to look for work,” said Lee Jae-hun, a researcher at the Public Policy Institute for People, in Seoul. “Without additional income, it’s impossible to carry on living for another thirty-some years.”
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2 days ago by shaunkoh
Citymapper has been granted a license to operate taxis in London - The Verge
- The Citymapper team has explained some of its motives behind the change with two blog posts on Medium within the last 48 hours. One, called “Good Bus (Part 1/3)”, describes some of the things that the Citymapper team thinks it did right in trialing its own late night bus route. The team touts how its bus service offered smart features like contactless payments, open seat tracking, smart displays, and USB chargers. The bus was also a social media hit, Citymapper says, with its pop music playlists and features like displaying rider-specific emoji on the screens to let people know when they arrived at their stop. But in a second post, “Bad Bus (Part 2/3),” the Citymapper team says it spent too much time running into regulatory walls to make it worth continuing the service. For example, one weekend into running the bus, Citymapper decided it wanted to change the route based on early rider data. “We had to wait weeks before our change was accepted,” the team writes. “Its [sic] hard to innovate and iterate on such timelines.”
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2 days ago by shaunkoh
Here’s why pop culture features so little public transportation / Boing Boing
<3 - Featuring public transportation on TV shows and movies normalizes it. Characters riding public transportation makes transit another setting–a place where life happens. Seeing it on screen makes it easier to envision it in your life.
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2 days ago by shaunkoh
Black Mirror is real (and backed by YC) 🤖👀 - Product Hunt
BLACK MIRROR IS A WARNING NOT A GUIDE PEOPLE - Black Mirror is real, and it's backed by Y Combinator. 👀 Meet Molly, a startup that's building an AI-version of you. It's already live with Gary V, Michael Seibel (President of Y Combinator), and 100s more. Molly learns from everything you've ever done or typed on the internet, so it can answer questions for you using machine learning. Molly was launched by a small, talented team including last year’s Golden Kitty award winner and long-time community member, Chris Messina. You'll soon be able to ask the best founders and investors anything. Since Molly is like a "download" of one's brain, it can answer questions 24/7... even from those that are no longer alive. Freaky.
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3 days ago by shaunkoh
301 Moved Permanently
- He woke her in the middle of the night. "Will you marry me," he asked. "Of course I will, darling," she replied, a bit saddened. Truth was, Michael and Linda Joyce had been married for 34 years, but Michael is battling Alzheimer's and he'd forgotten.
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3 days ago by shaunkoh
Florida student to NRA and Trump: 'We call BS' - CNN Video
“This might be the best speech ever on gun reform. Seriously, everyone should watch this.” - Reddit
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5 days ago by shaunkoh
Collapse of Civilization
Is anyone familiar with this sub-reddit? I can’t place my finger on why I’d be uncomfortable subscribing to it — perhaps it’s personal guilt, or joining a clear echo chamber.
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6 days ago by shaunkoh
This Is a Poem That Heals Fish: An Almost Unbearably Wonderful Picture-Book About How Poetry Works Its Magic – Brain Pickings
<3 - A poem is when you have the sky in your mouth. It is hot like fresh bread, when you eat it, a little is always left over. A poem is when you hear the heartbeat of a stone, when words beat their wings. It is a song sung in a cage. A poem is words turned upside down and suddenly! the world is new.
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6 days ago by shaunkoh
How Isaac Asimov shaped robotics and space exploration and predicted the Internet | Hacker News
A fantastic point. Is there a compelling collection anywhere of how technology has already transformed us? - People always seem to focus on the things science fiction writers include in the stories of the future. Someone, I think it may have been Asimov, but it might have been Heinlein or one of the other big names of that era, said that these are the least important things that science fiction writers predict. What is important, he said, was not the gadgets of the future, but how they change us. Predicting ubiquitous robots or personal jetpacks would be like a writer in 1880 predicting cars replacing horses. Sure, cars replacing horses is interesting...but what is important is predicting what the increased speed and range of cars over horses would do to everyday life. What do cars do to teen and young adult dating habits, for instance? With a car it is much easier to arrange a quick hook up with someone away from the prying eyes of your parents. That could have big ramifications. The future is more than just the present with nicer gadgets.
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6 days ago by shaunkoh
A crypto primer in the form of Ikea instructions / Boing Boing
Terrific stuff. No, this doesn’t refer to blockchain. - "Idea-instructions" bills itself as "An ongoing series of nonverbal algorithm assembly instructions", with a half-dozen illustrations of popular computer science concepts covered to date; the latest covers Public-Key Crypto, one of the most important and elusive concepts from modern crypto
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6 days ago by shaunkoh
Apple Park Employees Reportedly Can’t Stop Walking Into Its Glass Wall
I don’t know how true this is, but if it is, it saddens me a little. Not the part that people are walking into glass walls mind you - but instead the bit about the postits being taken down. If some part of the design isn’t working, fix it. It’s a small detail, but these details often tell you more about the character of an institution than the big ones. “Most people make the mistake of thinking design is what it looks like. People think it’s this veneer – that the designers are handed this box and told, “Make it look good!” That’s not what we think design is. It’s not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.” And yes, I don’t need snarky jokes about “you’re walking wrong”.
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6 days ago by shaunkoh
AT&T's 1993 "You Will" ads, the rightest wrong things ever predicted about the internet / Boing Boing
This is what happens when a company hires futurists as publicity, not as an anticipation of future existential risk to make difficult discisions on. - In 1993, AT&T ran a series of ads trumpeting the future of the internet, called "You Will." These ads depicted people doing stuff that was fundamentally normal, but made exotic because they were doing it over a 128k bonded ISDN pair provided by AT&T: tucking in their kids, attending meetings, getting medical advice, using self-serve kiosks at the DMV, etc. The ads are infamous in their own way, first because they were beautifully executed, and second because AT&T managed to predict a bunch of technologies without making any significant inroads in supplying those technologies (part of the reason AT&T is so anxious to kill Net Neutrality is that it failed to out-compete the companies that provided services over its wires, and so now it wants to exact a tax from them instead of trying to make things that people want). That's right, as far as it goes, but there is another way in which these so-right ads were so, so wrong: they predicted that the major impact of technology would be to make us more normal, not weirder: that teleconferencing would allow nuclear families to remain in touch even when separated by distance, but not that networks would allow polyamorous people to discretely meet one another and form amorphous, blended families. That we'd have videoconference board-meetings, but not that we'd galvanize political opposition by livestreaming police brutality. That we'd have smart-watches but not that we'd have hardware hackers creating free/open laptops from the bootloader up to root out monopolism and surveillance. I dropped out of four undergraduate programs, and the last university I didn't graduate from was the University of Waterloo, where I had submitted a thesis proposal for the Interdisciplinary Studies program that was grounded in this idea: that the predictions everyone made about the internet were about how much normal we were going to get, but that all the early evidence was that we were about to get way, way weirder, for better and for worse. It was 1993, and these ads were the impetus for the proposal. The university turned down my proposal, I took a job programming multimedia CD ROMs for Voyager, and never looked back.
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6 days ago by shaunkoh
TIL "a low sense of control is highly associated with anxiety, depression, and virtually all mental health problems. Researchers have found that a low sense of control is one of the most stressful things that people can experience." : todayilearned
- *Anxiety disorders can arise in response to life stresses such as financial worries or chronic physical illness. Anxiety among adolescents and young adults is common due to the stresses of social interaction, evaluation, and body image.* People experience stress when they do not believe that their resources for coping with obstacles are enough for what the circumstances demand. When people think the demands being placed on them exceed their ability to cope, they then perceive stress.
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8 days ago by shaunkoh
Buddhist Economics: How to Start Prioritizing People Over Products and Creativity Over Consumption – Brain Pickings
Fascinating. This is something I’ve intuitively been trying to do for a while, I’ve just lacked the language to describe it. Anyone familiar with this work? - [The modern Western economist] is used to measuring the “standard of living” by the amount of annual consumption, assuming all the time that a man who consumes more is “better off” than a man who consumes less. A Buddhist economist would consider this approach excessively irrational: since consumption is merely a means to human well-being, the aim should be to obtain the maximum of well-being with the minimum of consumption. […] The ownership and the consumption of goods is a means to an end, and Buddhist economics is the systematic study of how to attain given ends with the minimum means. [Western] economics, on the other hand, considers consumption to be the sole end and purpose of all economic activity, taking the factors of production — land, labor, and capital — as the means. The former, in short, tries to maximize human satisfactions by the optimal pattern of consumption, while the latter tries to maximize consumption by the optimal pattern of productive effort.
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8 days ago by shaunkoh
Citation Analysis - Measuring Your Impact: Impact Factor, Citation Analysis, and other Metrics - Subject & Course Guides at University of Illinois at Chicago
How do you look up someone's H-index without institutional academic journal access? Google Scholar doesn't make them public by default. (also, are there better ways to judge someone's academic interestingness?)
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8 days ago by shaunkoh
How to Store Food Airtight Without a Vacuum Sealer : howto
“And here I am sucking the air out of the bag by mouth like a fucking plebian.”
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8 days ago by shaunkoh
The NY Times Fires Tech Writer Quinn Norton, and It’s Complicated | WIRED
This is an important story. I’m sympathetic. - Everyone is redeemable, Norton explained, and silence or disengagement make racism worse. She pointed to an article she posted on Medium about talking to racists as part of fighting the good fight against them, but also keeping open the lines of communication—as opposed to just, you know, punching Nazis. Anyway, the Times compounded its apparent lack of due diligence with surrender to the mob, and fired her. Here’s the official statement from James Bennet, the editor of the editorial page: “Despite our review of Quinn Norton’s work and our conversations with her previous employers, this was new information to us. Based on it, we’ve decided to go our separate ways.” A few journalists, including a crowd of current and former WIRED staffers whom I greatly respect, criticized the decision. As my colleague Steven Levy wrote, “She’s no racist or Nazi sympathizer. She’s a smart edgy writer whose tweets are too easily taken out of context.” They described her as a complicated, forceful voice for the underrepresented—for women, for people of color, for the poor and the technologically disenfranchised. Those he-saids got she-saided by anti-Nazi hardliners (a phrase I did not know I would need, because, come on) and, especially, women of color. In Norton’s writing they saw a bad-faith ally.
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8 days ago by shaunkoh
[Serious] Redditors with a high maintenance GF/Fiancee/Wife, what are you doing this V-Day? : AskReddit
Yeaaaaaoch - >My ex-wife was like this. It was awful. She wanted flowers, but they had to be delivered at work. It wasn't the thought that counted, it was the spectacle. My ex was exactly the same way. She didn't care as much about the flowers as the fact that her coworkers got to see that she got flowers.
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8 days ago by shaunkoh
Salon to ad blockers: Can we use your browser to mine cryptocurrency? | Ars Technica
I’m really not sure how I feel about this. The carbon impact of block chain mining is real, and I can’t help but feel it was considered an externality from the people behind this design choice.
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9 days ago by shaunkoh
What are you sick of trying to explain to people? : AskReddit
I came expecting something on race, religion or privilege, but I found this on the top: - I’am Gardener in Germany. People ask for plants that bloom all over the year, need no water, need no light and don’t lose their leaves. That Plant doesn’t exist.
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9 days ago by shaunkoh
TIL American soldiers in the Pacific theater of WW2 always used passwords containing the letter 'L' due to Japanese mispronunciation, a word such as lollapalooza would be used and upon hearing the first two syllables come back as 'rorra' would "open fire
- It was said that Axis spies disguised as American soldiers were asked to recite Star Spangled Banner to prove they were the real deal. They recited the whole thing perfectly, and were immediately caught. Why? They recited *the whole thing.* Star-Spangled Banner has ***four*** stanzas, most Americans would only be familiar with the ~~first two~~ *first one.* (the part that is most commonly sung)
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9 days ago by shaunkoh
Why I finally replaced Evernote with Bear - The Verge
Bear is fucking beautiful. If Evernote eventually made writing digital notes a slog, Bear makes writing digitally something you’ll love again. No, they’re not paying me - it really is that good.
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10 days ago by shaunkoh
Oregon woman was reported to be the first human case of Thelazia gulosa, a parasite more commonly found in cattle. 14 worms were removed from her left eye. : science
- From the full paper: > A 26-year-old avid outdoorswoman from Oregon reported left eye irritation accompanied by the sensation of a foreign object. The patient had, in previous weeks, been practicing horsemanship in Gold Beach, OR, a region where cattle farming occurs. The irritation worsened and on the eighth day of symptoms, the patient removed a small, translucent worm. She presented to a local physician who removed two additional worms. The worms were submitted to Northwest Pathology for analysis and identification where they were fixed in 10% buffered formalin and forwarded to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Parasitic Diseases Reference Laboratory for identification. The following day, the patient presented to an optometrist where three additional worms were removed. The patient was arranged to see an infectious disease specialist who removed a partial worm, which was also sent to the CDC. The patient was diagnosed with parasitic infiltration of the left periocular tissues and a secondary bilateral papillary reaction of the upper and lower palpebral conjunctivae. The patient was advised to undergo manual extraction rather than topical or systemic antihelminthic therapy. Despite multiple washouts by ophtalmologists, no further worms were seen by providers; however, the patient continued to remove worms from her left eye. A total of 14 worms were removed from the patient’s left eye over 20 days. Since this time, the patient has been without symptoms and no further worms have been observed.
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10 days ago by shaunkoh
301 Moved Permanently
This is the coolest reddit bot ever - When I first saw this article from Washington Post, its title was: > Congress is spending as if we're in a recession instead of saving up to fight the next one Here are some other articles about this story: * The New York Times: [The GOP Is Flirting With Fiscal Disaster](http://ift.tt/2Ebz1ym) * The Economic Times: [Trump signs budget deal, bringing end to second shutdown of 2018](http://ift.tt/2EfvE9D) * The New York Times: [Amid Turmoil From Washington to Wall Street, a Surprisingly Passive President](http://ift.tt/2nPBhRV) * CNBC: [The White House is preparing to release its budget – and it won't balance](http://ift.tt/2EyleBt) * sbs.com.au: [Trump signs bill ending government shutdown](http://ift.tt/2BT7kZx) * Washington Post: [The drama of the overnight shutdown, hour by hour](http://ift.tt/2EwQbGc) * China News Service: [Trump signs deal to end brief gov't shutdown](http://ift.tt/2o1iWjN) * Washington Post: [Forget about small government. Republicans support big debt.](http://ift.tt/2ESNOv8) ----- I am a bot trying to encourage a balanced news diet. These are all of the articles I think are about this story. I do not select or sort articles based on any opinions or perceived biases, and neither I nor my creator advocate for or against any of these sources or articles. It is your responsibility to determine what is factually correct.
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11 days ago by shaunkoh
Equilibriums and Limits: A Better Way to Talk Politics - The Atlantic
An exceptionally great piece. - We sometimes think of political issues in binary terms. Is someone pro-life or pro-choice? But most individuals hold views that are more complicated than a binary can capture. An alternative is to describe a given position on a spectrum. On abortion, an outright ban sits at one extreme; at the other is the elimination of all restrictions on the procedure. In between are a staggering array of coherently distinguishable positions. Politicians seeking to win votes express their stances either in terms of a binary or as a spot on a spectrum, depending on where they see the greatest advantage. Though their beliefs don’t change, how they frame them makes a political difference. * * * There’s a different set of frames, though, that are as relevant as binaries and spectrums, though they are less familiar and less discussed: equilibriums and limits. Most political stances can be understood in terms of an equilibrium. For instance, some people might believe that access to abortion in a conservative state is too restricted under the status quo, and favor relaxing the rules regulating abortion clinics. That is, they might favor shifting the equilibrium in a “pro-choice” direction.
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11 days ago by shaunkoh
Facial recognition software is biased towards white men, researcher finds - The Verge
- Joy Buolamwini, a researcher at the MIT Media Lab, recently built a dataset of 1,270 faces, using the faces of politicians, selected based on their country’s rankings for gender parity (in other words, having more females in office). Buolamwini then tested the accuracy of three facial recognition systems: those made by Microsoft, IBM, and Megvii of China. The results, which were originally reported in The New York Times, showed inaccuracies in gender identification dependent on a person’s skin color. Gender was misidentified in less than one percent of lighter-skinned males; in up to seven percent of lighter-skinned females; up to 12 percent of darker-skinned males; and up to 35 percent in darker-skinner females. “Overall, male subjects were more accurately clas- sified than female subjects replicating previous findings (Ngan et al., 2015), and lighter subjects were more accurately classified than darker individuals,” Buolamwini wrote in a paper about her findings, which was co-authored by Timnit Gebru, a Microsoft researcher. “An intersectional breakdown reveals that all classifiers performed worst on darker female subjects.”
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11 days ago by shaunkoh
Crypto Canon – Andreessen Horowitz
Has anyone seen this list of background reading on blockchain? I also note how crypto doesn’t primarily mean encryption anymore. - Here’s a list — building on and including Chris’ last roundup — of crypto readings and resources. It’s organized from building blocks and basics; foundations (& history); and key concepts and beginners’ guides — followed by specific topics such as governance; privacy and security; scaling; consensus; cryptoeconomics and investing; fundraising and token distribution; decentralized exchanges; stablecoins; and cryptoeconomic primitives (crytocollectibles, curation markets, games). We also included a section with developer tutorials, practical guides, and maker stories — as well as other resources, such as newsletters and courses, at the end.
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11 days ago by shaunkoh
Why do poor Americans eat so unhealthfully? Because junk food is the only indulgence they can afford : Foodforthought
- Honoring requests for junk food allowed poor parents to show their children that they loved them, heard them and could meet their needs. As one low-income single mother told me: "They want it, they'll get it. One day they'll know. They'll know I love them, and that's all that matters." Junk food purchases not only brought smiles to kids' faces, but also gave parents something equally vital: a sense of worth and competence as parents in an environment where those feelings were constantly jeopardized.
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14 days ago by shaunkoh
Report: Video Games Will Never Be Art
- NEW YORK—Having concluded they are at best nice little distractions suitable for children and adolescents, researchers at Columbia University released a report Tuesday confirming video games will never reach the level of art. “Our findings show that video games can be a fun activity, especially for children 14 and younger, but they are no more than trivial pastimes and certainly not to be compared with serious artistic endeavors such as literature and music,” said Professor Clarence Wadleigh, stressing that developers of more serious games like The Witness or That Dragon, Cancer should abandon their futile attempts to create art if they ever want to make something that’s actually fun to play. “Based on our research, we must recommend that game designers who fancy themselves as artists come to terms with the fact that their work will never serve as anything more than light entertainment for young people. If they attempt anything more ambitious, then frankly, they’re only going to embarrass themselves.” Citing its nonlinear structure and “super fun puzzles,” Lantz added that the video game that came closest to reaching the level of art was definitely Banjo-Kazooie.
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15 days ago by shaunkoh
It’s Time to End the Scam of Flying Pets - The New York Times
- Maybe a trust-based system will return at some point. But it won’t return automatically. When trust breaks down and small bits of dishonesty become normal, people need to make a conscious effort to restore basic decency.
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17 days ago by shaunkoh
“We have to be twice as careful when talking about difficult topics,” | MetaFilter
- “This is a blog post about why games are not always an excellent way to deliver a complex message to a wide audience.” “If the mod was just something someone had cooked up in their spare time it might not be a problem, but with the CSER name attached – as well as Cambridge, one of the world’s most famous universities – the mod is now a publicity tool, carrying with it the weight of academic endorsement. And this is awkward, because with that extra reputation attached the game’s messages might now be interpreted a lot more strongly by those playing it. For example, the mod’s failure condition of a Rogue AI taking over the world will always happen unless players avert it – it is not something that has a chance of happening. The mod’s message is the AI is fundamentally unsafe, and doing any kind of experimentation with it will lead to the destruction of civilisation. To fight this, the mod advocates for technology becoming the “slave” of mankind, through the construction of safety labs (modelled on, I assume, CSER itself).”
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23 days ago by shaunkoh
302 Found
- To be successful over the course of a career requires the application and accumulation of expertise. This assumes that for any given undertaking you either provide expertise or you are just a bystander. It’s the experts that are the drivers—an expertise that is gained from a curiosity, and a mindset of treating one’s craft very seriously. A startup is by nature a crash course in developing expertise. What makes startups unique is the sheer dearth of resources. This dearth of resources forces founders to rapidly adapt their skills to meet the demands of the project. ‘I didn’t know how to do x, so I just had to figure it out.’ This is what I regularly hear from successful founders, whereas ‘I couldn’t find someone to do X, so I had to reconsider whether to pursue it at all’ is a common refrain from unsuccessful founders.
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26 days ago by shaunkoh
What was a meal you loved as a kid but now that you’re an adult you realize your parents only made because you were poor? : AskReddit
- You know... You just triggered a memory that I had completely forgotten about. Between the ages of 11 and 13, my dad was out of work. Our family really struggled in that time. Dinners were often quite meager. I remember one day, we were all at the dinner table, and my mom put a steak in front of me... But no one else. Not my sister, not my dad, not my mother. I asked, "No body else wants steak?" And they said, "No, they don't like it." So I joyfully ate that steak all by myself, while everyone else ate something much cheaper. 3 decades later, I see what was going on... I was a skinny kid, and my mother was worried that I was anemic or not getting enough nutrition during what should be an adolescent growth phase. So she told the rest of the family that she needed to feed me the steak, and there would be none for everyone else. And like the selfish snot-nosed pre-teen, I gobbled it all down with out sharing a bite. They probably thought it smelled delicious. I really regret that. I'm ashamed of it.
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29 days ago by shaunkoh
Don't wear a seat belt, WCGW? : Whatcouldgowrong
- EMT here, I’ve responded to accidents where I’ve seen people who were buckled up but still died because of a passenger who wasn’t. The first time I saw someone’s jaw/teeth lodged into the person’s head who sat in front of them was when I decided I’d always wear a seatbelt, even in the back Edit: Wow this blew up way more than I ever thought it would. I’d prefer not to go into a lot of detail but to address what some people are asking: - The person in the back’s face slammed into the back of the driver. Parts of said passengers face remained embedded into the back of the drivers head. Yes they both died. In cases like this you’ll often find teeth stuck in the drivers skull, sometimes you do see parts of the mandible though. - often the passenger has so much velocity that they actually smash through the headrest and continue forward into the person they’re sitting behind - seatbelts 99.999999% of the time save your life. If you’re concerned with getting stuck in your vehicle due to a seatbelt malfunction, carry a seatbelt cutter on your person when you drive. The story you have where the seatbelt actually killed the person because it cut into them or something ridiculous, I’m sorry but that person was 100% going to die whether or not they wore a seatbelt then. - BUCKLE UP, it takes two seconds to live the rest of your life.
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
301 Moved Permanently
Meta observation: I’m sharing this even though I haven’t verified whether the reddit comment is a fair representation of an actual academic’s work. It’s validating something I suspect may have some degree of truth in it — in ways that allow me to express an in-group tribal affiliation with critical skepticism. What responsibility does one have for the information you propagate? - “I'm a graduate linguistics student and I can assure you that a huge amount of research has been done into this phenomenon over the past century, mainly by the Canadian linguist William Samarin. Not only is no meaningful information communicated by these utterances, even the very phonetic structure of the utterances proves that they are created on the spot by the human mind. u/Procrastinationist makes the salient point that only native phonemes are used in glossolalic utterances, but it gets even better than that: not only do speakers use only native phonemes, they use these phonemes in a way which maximises articulatory ease. That is to say, they always use the most "easiest" combinations of vowels and consonants for the human speech organs to produce (e.g. there is a strong preponderance of the vowel A and for the syllable structure consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel, etc.). So either it's just a massive, global coincidence that the language of the Spirit is limited to easier-to-pronounce recombinations of native sounds, or they're making it up.”
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Tolerant Tykes: Small Children Aren't Inherently Racist - Pacific Standard
- Perhaps surprisingly, the corresponding attitude of their parents (66 of the kids' mothers or fathers also took the test) was not related to the kids' beliefs. The researchers note that previous studies have found this sort of mirroring of attitudes doesn't begin until the kids are a bit older—ages six to eight, according to one recent study. The make-up of a child's immediate environment, however, appeared to influence their views. Using home zip codes supplied by their parents, the researchers noted the demographic make-up of the neighborhoods of 97 of the young participants. They found both black and white kids were less likely to see certain abilities or attitudes as determined by race if they lived in a more racially diverse area. Altogether, the results suggest "beliefs about race that contribute to prejudice take a long time to develop—when they do—and that their development depends to some extent on the neighborhoods in which the children grow up," co-author Marjorie Rhodes, a New York University psychologist, said in announcing the findings. Further study will determine whether racially diverse schools similarly shape young minds in a non-prejudicial direction
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
I'm not a crying man, but my cat died. : offmychest
- I think pets are, many times, completely different than friends or family... They become a constant. We come to expect them to be waiting for us wherever we left them, and to be there for us, and to cuddle with us, and to remain a constant. When the consistency fails, we come to realize it as more of a drastic change than (sometimes, by no means all the time) losing a relative. Family is liquid, it morphs. Pets are constant.
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
No Cutting Corners on the iPhone X – Tall West – Medium
- Here’s where the nerd part comes in, iPhone X rounded screen corners don’t use the classic rounding method where you move in a straight line and then arc using a single quadrant of a circle. Instead, the math is a bit more complicated. Commonly called a squircle, the slope starts sooner, but is more gentle.
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
duco.newhaircut.com
Randomly stumbled across this! Has anyone used it?
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Paths of 800 unmanned bicycles being pushed until they fall over : dataisbeautiful
“I pulled this very graph out of the shower drain when the water started backing up.” - Reddit
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
A Madman Dreams of Tuning Machines: The Story of Joseph Weber, the Tragic Hero of Science Who Followed Einstein’s Vision and Pioneered the Sound of Spacetime – Brain Pickings
- When the LIGO team published the official paper announcing the groundbreaking discovery, Weber was acknowledged as the pioneer of gravitational wave research. But like Alan Turing, who was granted posthumous pardon by the Queen more than half a century after he perished by inhumane injustice, Weber’s redemption is culturally bittersweet at best. I’m reminded of a beautiful passage from Levin’s novel about Turing and Gödel, strangely perfect in the context of Weber’s legacy: Their genius is a testament to our own worth, an antidote to insignificance; and their bounteous flaws are luckless but seemingly natural complements, as though greatness can be doled out only with an equal measure of weakness… Their broken lives are mere anecdotes in the margins of their discoveries. But then their discoveries are evidence of our purpose, and their lives are parables on free will.
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4 weeks ago by shaunkoh
If they made a show called "White Mirror" that was about all the positive aspects of the human/technology relationship, what would be the plot of certain episodes? : AskReddit
- A bed-ridden grandmother in the hospital is able to virtually attend her grandkids' birthday parties and play with them every day. My mother actually had a friend that we barely knew, but we accepted her Facebook friend request out of courtesy, and she absolutely gushes about seeing photos of our kids on Facebook. She sends them presents and cards, she knows what they like, we've even started having Facebook calls with her. She's so warm and giving and gives them 100% of her attention, which is something parents just can't do as often as kids would like. They'll go running around the room holding the phone up to different things saying stuff like "Ruth it snowed! Look!" My wife got nervous yesterday because they took the phone outside to play in the snow and were having so much fun throwing snowballs at the phone -- I told her screw it, if they break the phone doing something like that I'll buy a new one. It's worth it. She's like part of our family, and it's all because technology initially allowed her to "passively" participate with us. The relationship grew organically over time the way relationships used to before the internet -- you'd see people frequently at work or at the store or in your neighborhood, over time have longer conversations, and ultimately grow to be friends. The same thing happened here: it started with a like or a comment here or there, then a couple messages, then a virtual birthday card... it enables people to remain in communication with so many more people passively when used correctly. Our kids have never even met her physically, though. Her immune system is too delicate to accept visitors. But even through a 6" screen, it's like she's really here. I can only imagine what it will be like when virtual reality lets them really be together.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Dear Zuck, – Human Systems – Medium
A heady read. Would love to chat about this in person - if this speaks to you too! - Consider how social conventions shape our lives: teenagers are ostracized for wearing the wrong clothes, adults for saying the wrong words or spouting unpopular beliefs. But it’s still possible to flout convention, and by operating expressively, outside of conventions, a person can sometimes initiate a new trend or subculture. With software, on the other hand, acting in a way the designers didn’t intend is often impossible: a user can’t sing “Thrift Shop” to a stranger on Tinder or wear their Facebook cover photo on the bottom of the screen. The software has structured the sequence and style with which they interact.² We see something similar if we compare software with laws. Imagine if Twitter were implemented through government regulation: there’d be a law about how many letters you used when you spoke, and an ordinance deciding who wore a checkmark near their face and who didn’t. Imagine bureaucrats deciding who’s visible to the public, and who gets ignored. Could a law make you carry around and display everything you’d recently said?
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
The Astrophysicist Who Wants to Help Solve Baltimore's Urban Blight | WIRED
- On its face, mapping galaxies has little to do with finding abandoned buildings. But deep down, Budavári says, they’re both essentially data problems, which require analyzing massive amounts of telltale signals to detect and draw patterns the human eye can’t easily see. “I thought: Can we measure this correlation of clustering of vacant houses the same way we made measurements about astronomy,” says Budavári.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
About Wanderings
- Wanderings is a location tracking application that shows a heatmap of where you've been. It is low effort; just keep the Wanderings iPhone App running in the background on your phone and it will record where you are occasionally using GPS and other location methods. Then come to the website to see a heatmap of where you have been. We hope to run Wanderings for years.
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
It's the (Democracy-Poisoning) Golden Age of Free Speech | WIRED
- These companies—which love to hold themselves up as monuments of free expression—have attained a scale unlike anything the world has ever seen; they’ve come to dominate media distribution, and they increasingly stand in for the public sphere itself. But at their core, their business is mundane: They’re ad brokers. To virtually anyone who wants to pay them, they sell the capacity to precisely target our eyeballs. They use massive surveillance of our behavior, online and off, to generate increasingly accurate, automated predictions of what advertisements we are most susceptible to and what content will keep us clicking, tapping, and scrolling down a bottomless feed. So what does this algorithmic public sphere tend to feed us? In tech parlance, Facebook and YouTube are “optimized for engagement,” which their defenders will tell you means that they’re just giving us what we want. But there’s nothing natural or inevitable about the specific ways that Facebook and YouTube corral our attention. The patterns, by now, are well known. As Buzzfeed famously reported in November 2016, “top fake election news stories generated more total engagement on Facebook than top election stories from 19 major news outlets combined.” Humans are a social species, equipped with few defenses against the natural world beyond our ability to acquire knowledge and stay in groups that work together. We are particularly susceptible to glimmers of novelty, messages of affirmation and belonging, and messages of outrage toward perceived enemies. These kinds of messages are to human community what salt, sugar, and fat are to the human appetite. And Facebook gorges us on them—in what the company’s first president, Sean Parker, recently called “a social-­validation feedback loop.”
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Bad design in action: the false Hawaiian ballistic missile alert
- Instead of selecting “DRILL - PACOM (CDW) - STATE ONLY” from what looks more like a list of headlines on The Drudge Report than a warnings & alerts menu, the operator chose “PACOM (CDW) - STATE ONLY” and sent out a real alert. The design for this is obviously terrible. As others have noted, there are better interfaces for confirming much more trivial actions on our phones. In Mailchimp, the service that powers the Noticing newsletter, you are asked to manually type in the word “DELETE” as a confirmation for deleting a template (an action a tiny bit less consequential than sending out a ballistic missile launch alert):
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
www.learnnow.sg
Has anyone considered applying for this fund?
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5 weeks ago by shaunkoh
It’s Time to Bomb North Korea – Foreign Policy
Da fuck. This is a horrifically irresponsible argument. - Nonetheless, given South Korea’s deliberate inaction over many years, any damage ultimately done to Seoul cannot be allowed to paralyze the United States in the face of immense danger to its own national interests, and to those of its other allies elsewhere in the world.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
The case against luxury gyms like SoulCycle - Vox
- There’s a pretty simple adage public health officials stick to: Make it easy for people to stay healthy, and make it hard for them to get sick. More specifically, as David Hemenway, a health policy professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, puts it, “Make it easy to get good food and hard to get lousy food, and make it easy to exercise.”
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
GoPro quits the drone business | Hacker News
Ripe for a Stratechery episode - The thing is that you simply can't compete with the vertical integration of DJI. Taking images and videos is still by far and large the reason to fly drones in the first place, and once you own the vertical stack and can integrate your imagers with the electromechanics (gimbal) you get to a very small and efficienct package. Think about that: for every gram of camera, you need two grams of stabilizer, then you need four grams of drone and battery to carry that. While DJI just stabilize their optics and sensor, GoPro stabilizes an entire 80g, bulky camera. This is mainly why the Karma is so big and heavy compared to the DJI Mavic (there are some advantages to DJI in propulsion and batteries but those are pretty small; not a lot of proprietary tech in those fields).
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Eight-year-old boy discovers that wild pigs appear to grieve their dead / Boing Boing
- Having studied the social, pig-like mammals for years, Altrichter knew how tightly bonded peccaries could be. But she'd never witnessed herd members return to a body repeatedly ... “It was pretty amazing because it wasn’t just an immediate reaction and then they moved on—it went on for 10 days,” says Altrichter, chair of the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Peccary Specialist Group. [snip] In the videos, the peccaries pay close attention to the body, nuzzling, biting, sniffing, and staring at it. They slept next to the carcass, and even tried to lift it by wedging their snouts under the body and pushing upward. And when a pack of coyotes approached their fallen peer, the herd chased them away. “It really surprised me that they would stand up to the coyotes,” says de Kort, noting the peccaries were outnumbered.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
A Real 'Very Stable Genius' Doesn't Call Himself One - The Atlantic
- Here are three traits I would report from a long trail of meeting and interviewing people who by any reckoning are very intelligent. - They all know it. A lifetime of quietly comparing their ease in handling intellectual challenges—at the chess board, in the classroom, in the debating or writing arena—with the efforts of other people gave them the message. - Virtually none of them (need to) say it. There are a few prominent exceptions, of talented people who annoyingly go out of their way to announce that fact. Muhammed Ali is the charming extreme exception illustrating the rule: he said he was The Greatest, and was. Most greats don’t need to say so. It would be like Roger Federer introducing himself with, “You know, I’m quite graceful and gifted.” Or Meryl Streep asking, “Have you seen my awards?” - They know what they don’t know. This to me is the most consistent marker of real intelligence. The more acute someone’s ability to perceive and assess, the more likely that person is to recognize his or her limits. These include the unevenness of any one person’s talents; the specific areas of weakness—social awkwardness, musical tin ear, being stronger with numbers than with words, or vice versa; and the incomparable vastness of what any individual person can never know. To read books seriously is to be staggered by the knowledge of how many more books will remain beyond your ken. It’s like looking up at the star-filled sky.
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Liu Cixin Is China’s Answer to Arthur C. Clarke | The New Yorker
- “In another story, “The Devourer,” a character asks, “What is civilization? Civilization is devouring, ceaselessly eating, endlessly expanding.” But you can’t expand forever; perhaps it would be better, another character suggests, to establish a “self-sufficient, introspective civilization.” At the core of Liu’s sensibility, in short, is a philosophical interest in the problem of limits. How should we react to the inherent limitations of life? Should we push against them or acquiesce?”
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
"Death's End": Cixin Liu's Masterpiece Trilogy, Concluded — Fiction Unbound
A fantastic question I have no idea how to answer - “This conflict imbues the trilogy with a moral complexity that offers little comfort to our earthbound sensibilities. In a crowded universe where life is always expanding but the total amount of matter remains finite, the outcome of a decision can be morally right, as judged by human ideals, and yet lead to unimaginable catastrophe, as Cheng Xi discovers not once but twice. If standing firm on your principles results in the end of human civilization as we know it and the destruction of the Solar System, what good are those principles?”
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6 weeks ago by shaunkoh
China’s Race to Find Aliens First - The Atlantic
The Dark Forest was a breathtaking book. - He told me that we are limited in how we think about other civilizations. “Especially those that may last millions or billions of years,” he said. “When we wonder why they don’t use certain technologies to spread across a galaxy, we might be like spiders wondering why humans don’t use webs to catch insects.” And anyway, an older civilization that has achieved internal peace may still behave like a hunter, Liu said, in part because it would grasp the difficulty of “understanding one another across cosmic distances.” And it would know that the stakes of a misunderstanding could be existential.
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7 weeks ago by shaunkoh
To beat President Trump, you have to learn to think like his supporters - The Washington Post
A short but cogent read. - Sheer outrage at the president’s scandals is pointless. When directed at Trump, your anger gives him rhetorical ammunition to point toward his besiegers (“We should have a contest as to which of the Networks, plus CNN and not including Fox, is the most dishonest, corrupt and/or distorted in its political coverage of your favorite President (me)”) or to bolster his claims to be fighting for his base (“Drain the Swamp should be changed to Drain the Sewer — it’s actually much worse than anyone ever thought, and it begins with the Fake News!”). But worse still is directing your anger at his supporters. Then you’re doing the same thing Trump is: believing your side is all right and the opposite side is all wrong. Rejecting your common humanity and sense of country, you’re playing into the polarization game instead of defeating it. This is not a call for appeasement, only for efficiency. If dwelling on scandal too much can be counterproductive, then the focus must be elsewhere. Again, I believe it should rest on understanding and empathizing with the grievances that brought Trump to power (wage stagnation, cultural isolation, a depleted countryside, the opioid crisis). Trump’s solutions may be imaginary, but the problems are very real indeed. Populism is and has always been the daughter of political despair. Showing concern is the only way to break the rhetorical polarization.
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7 weeks ago by shaunkoh
What You Will Find on a Design Researcher’s Bookshelf | design mind
Many many great reads. What else would you add to this library?
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8 weeks ago by shaunkoh
301 Moved Permanently
- >この悔しさが人を強くする😭👍 "This [Kuyashi]ness makes people strong." As a translator of many years, I still find [悔し] one of the hardest Japanese words to translate to English. There just really isn't an English word for this emotion. In practice, we translators substitute it with words like bitter, painful, hurt, frustration and the like, depending on context. But none of them are true translations. Kuyashii is that feeling after failure. Not that downtrodden feeling of being beaten and defeated, no. It's that feeling when you're dropped from the team at the last minute. It's what makes you slam your fist at the turf when you've missed a sitter. It's what makes grown men cry on the pitch after losing at the Champions League or World Cup finals. So close, could have done better. It's that feeling when your song sells so much better when someone else covers it. It's the taste of hard to accept defeat, because you know you had a shot and you came up short. Sometimes it's not even your fault. It's the taste of iron in your mouth when you're grounded for something your brother did. It's the lump in your throat when your professor publishes your research in his name. It's the fever behind your eyeballs when your crush marries your friend. It's your fist clenching your bank statement as you terminate that awesome game you're developing because you haven't got the funding. It's that feeling of wanting another shot. That wanting to be better, come back stronger. The wanting to win next time. >この後仲直り "We made up after this". :)
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8 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Jan Chipchase - Field Research Masterclass, Singapore, Dec 7
Did anyone attend the Field Research Masterclass? What was it like? Would you recommend it?
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8 weeks ago by shaunkoh
If your kid stops believing in Santa this year... - Album on Imgur
- I love this: When your child stops believing in Santa, it’s time for them to *become* a Santa
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8 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Daring Fireball: Merry
Merry Christmas everybody - Merry Sunday, 25 December 2011 Late last night, inspecting Santa’s handiwork, a simple thought occurred to me. A decade or so from now, when, say, I’m waiting for my son to come home from college for his winter break, and, when he does, he wants to spend his time going out with his friends — how much will I be willing to pay then to be able to go back in time, for one day, to now, when he’s eight years old, he wants to go to movies and play games and build Lego kits with me, and he believes in magic? How much then, for one day with what my family has right now? How much? Everything. The truth is, I’m the luckiest person in the world today. I hope you are too.
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8 weeks ago by shaunkoh
Ontario makes it illegal to protest outside and near abortion clinics - Canada : worldnews
- Ontario and Canada in general value "peaceful living" more than Free Speech. We are NOT AMERICA, there is a massive difference. Anyone that thinks free speech in public places obviously doesn't have to deal with hate speech directed at them. I am gay, I am glad that this country doesn't let nut job Christians tell me I'm going to hell in public. I HAVE THE RIGHT TO LIVE PEACEFULLY. Taking away someone's right to harass others is a fair trade off, what mentally harms someone more? Not being able to spew hate or not being able to be avoid being told they're a piece of shit in public. Too much value is placed on free speech, when total free speech is actually more harmful than a bit of silenced free speech. Honestly, who is hurt more? The people who are against abortions, or the people getting the abortions being told they're garbage? Which is worse? Enough of this anti-SJW rhetoric too. People deserve to live in peace, I don't deserve to be told I'm a sinning pile of crap by people I have done absolutely nothing wrong to. But people romanticize freedom of speech and claim "slippery slopes", when in reality we are just trying to let people live their god damn lives in peace. It's easy to hold free speech dearly when it isn't a detriment to your life, free speech is a scary thing to me, if total free speech were allowed, I would like to be able to physically assault the people who harass me, defense should be allowed. People kill themselves over being told they're garbage, people don't kill themselves because they can't stand on a street corner and yell bullshit at others. Stop romanticizing free speech, it never was and isn't a part of Canadian values, freedom to a peaceful life has and always will be. Sometimes you godda silence the jerks so others can have decent lives, nobody is gonna convince me that limiting hate speech and protests like this negatively affects those who wish to protest, the ends justify the means. Westboro Baptist church members aren't up at night worrying about why they can't tell me I'm a piece of shit, but I certainly would be up at night worrying about being harassed and ostracized if these types of laws did not exist. Enough is enough, stop giving opinions on things you do not understand.
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
Indian village run by teenage girls offers hope for a life free from abuse | Global development | The Guardian
- Each afternoon the men of Thennamadevi leave their village and head for the surrounding fields, many carrying bottles of high-strength home-brewed alcohol. Hours later they stagger back home through the paddy fields of the state of Tamil Nadu in southern India. Thennamadevi is racked by alcoholism. Most of its 150 male inhabitants participate in ruinous daily drinking sessions. Around 90 women with families in the village have been widowed. The youngest husband to die was 21. However, over the past six months something remarkable has happened to break the cycle of squalor and despair: the teenage daughters of the drunken men have taken over the running of the place. And it’s working. A self-titled “young girls’ club” has fixed the street lights, completed a health audit of the village and ensured that mobile clinics visit Thennamadevi. A library is being built where well-thumbed books promote the virtues of learning and independence. The phenomenon of teenage female self-help has made aid agencies and politicians across the state sit up and take notice. In the communal building, beneath the glow of a single lightbulb, the girls assembled earlier this month for a debate on further improvements. A petition urging better transport links – no buses pass near the village – has been drafted to be put to the local council.
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
The Senate Was Touched by Greatness Today: In Praise of Jeff Flake - Lawfare
- In the wake of Flake's speech, some #NeverTrump conservatives are lamenting that he did not decide to stay and fight. I appreciate their point. But to me the salient fact is that neither Flake nor Corker felt able to be true to themselves without taking the step of not having to face Republican voters again. We can regret that fact, but as political analysts we must appreciate its reality. We must appreciate that sometimes one has to manufacture the conditions in which one is free to speak the truth. And I will not hide my admiration for those who take that step.
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
India Warily Eyes AI - MIT Technology Review
- This is a familiar pattern in history: every technological stride forward has meant that the same amount of work can be done by fewer people. “Whenever there’s a revolution, there’s a worry about fewer jobs. It happened with the Industrial Revolution as well,” says Ravi Kumar, at Infosys. “The reality is, though, that there’s more consumption,” he adds. That eventually increases the need for new kinds of labor. At the moment, he says, enterprises spend 65 to 70 percent of their IT budgets “just to keep the lights on”—to pay for infrastructure and routine support. If that money is undammed, it may well pour into new—and as yet unimagined—streams of revenue and employment: “It would mean a much bigger canvas for us.” But even if he is right, there is a tension between the long arc of these revolutions and the far shorter one of human lives. In the near term, people will lose their livelihoods. Sunil Kumar is still without a job. In June, he filed a petition for wrongful dismissal with the office of the labor commissioner, a state body that resolves industrial disputes and enforces labor laws. Once, when he checked on its progress, an official advised him that his fight was likely to be a lengthy one, and now he suspects nothing will come of it. “Whatever confidence I had, I’m losing it,” he says. When he reads his newspapers, he stops just short of the business pages, which frustrate him. “There will be companies saying many things: ‘We’re hiring this many people, there are many opportunities.’ The CEOs keep saying it. I stopped reading all this,” he says. He knows he ought to start looking for a new job, but he hasn’t been able to pull himself together; it is as if his dismissal had stymied life itself. “I haven’t been able to concentrate on anything,” he says. “It’s very difficult now.”
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
As Automation Eliminates Jobs, Tech Entrepreneurs Join Basic Income Movement : NPR
- "The reality is that work has changed. Forty percent of jobs are now contingent, meaning they're part-time, independent contractors, Uber drivers," he says. And he says that shift has already left middle-class Americans economically insecure. A recent study by the Federal Reserve found that 46 percent of Americans surveyed didn't have enough cash to cover a $400 emergency expense. That feeling of insecurity is evident in this tumultuous presidential election.
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
Female homicide rate dropped after Craigslist launched its erotic services platform – ThinkProgress
- Law enforcement hoped that closing the site would reduce trafficking, but it didn’t help Monroe. When she told her pimp SFRedbook was gone, he shrugged. Then he told her that she would just have to work outdoors from then on. “When they closed down Redbook, they pushed me to the street,” Monroe told ThinkProgress. “We had a set limit we had to make a day, which was more people, cheaper dates, and if you didn’t bring that home, it was ugly.” Monroe, who asked that her last name be withheld for privacy reasons, had been working through Redbook in hotel rooms almost without incident, but working outdoors was much less safe. “I got raped and robbed a couple of times,” she said. “You’re in people’s cars, which means nobody can hear you if you get robbed or beaten up.” ... Monroe is no longer working on the street. While the police were more interested in arresting her than helping her, she connected with SWOP Sacramento. The organization helped her leave her pimp. She has two daughters and is currently working at the post office. But she still vividly remembers how much less safe she became when Redbook shut down. The approach to sex work, Monroe argued, should be more like the approach to heroin addiction. “They tried everything they could to stop the heroin epidemic, but they couldn’t,” she said. “So why not pass out clean needles?”
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
SafeButler (YC S17) is hiring employee #2 to modernize insurance | Hacker News
Is there a credible mint-for-insurance alternative in the US / SG now?
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
New Zealand's new prime minister called capitalism a "blatant failure", before citing levels of homelessness and low wages as evidence that "the market has failed" her country's poor. : worldnews
- I'm a New Zealander and she's right about homelessness. The housing market has gone insane over the last ten years. The national news touts us as the most unaffordable housing in the world. Rents are rising constantly. In Auckland city, there's hundreds of people sleeping in the street outside the city mission every night of the year. Almost every local park has people sleeping in cars every night. I hope Adern can back up this rhetoric and really make inroads here.
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
In China’s Coal Capital, Xi Jinping’s Dream Remains Elusive - The New York Times
- In an agenda-setting report at a Communist Party congress in Beijing this past week, Mr. Xi, who also leads the party, held out a new dream of a China that would become cleaner, more prosperous and fairer in sharing the benefits of its increasing wealth. This vision of a brighter future is aimed at fixing social ills created by three decades of often-breakneck growth: polluted skies and waters, deep-rooted corruption and growing inequalities. To succeed, Mr. Xi’s China dream must take root in rural and rust-belt backwaters like Datong, where many of China’s almost 1.4 billion people still live. But to hear locals in this former capital of China’s coal industry tell it, the bustling scenes of construction mask a stark disconnect between Mr. Xi’s bright promises and their hardscrabble reality. While China’s overall economy has clocked dazzling growth rates, workers and farmers here say their lives have not improved nearly as quickly, if at all. Despite Mr. Xi’s promises of a cleaner and more responsive government, they complain that local officials still ignore them, or run roughshod over their lives. Most important, they said, Mr. Xi’s China dream had yet to deliver what they needed most: better jobs, improved health care and affordable housing. In interviews here, the same refrain was often repeated: “Xi Jinping is good, but. ...” “Xi Jinping is a good president, but his policies aren’t implemented here,” said Hu Wenxiang, who lives in Ronghuazao, a village in a rural part of Datong.
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
The Great Decoupling: An Interview with Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
Sobering read. - “Our one confident prediction is that digital technologies will bring the world into an era of more wealth and abundance and less drudgery and toil. But there’s no guarantee that everyone will share in the bounty, and that leaves many people justifiably apprehensive. The outcome—shared prosperity or increasing inequality—will be determined not by technologies but by the choices we make as individuals, organizations, and societies. If we fumble that future—if we build economies and societies that exclude many people from the cycle of prosperity—shame on us. Technological progress is an extraordinarily powerful force, but it’s not destiny. It won’t lift us into utopia or carry us into an unwanted future. The power to do that rests with us human beings. Technologies are merely our tools.” The Great Decoupling: An Interview with Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
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october 2017 by shaunkoh
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