seaugust + intriguetech   235

USPS scratch and sniff stamps bring fruity scents this summer: how it works
Unlike a piece of paper with a scent sprayed onto it, these stickers/stamps retain their scents for long periods of time. How does it work? Via a method called micro-encapsulation, which takes a chemical scent and essentially traps it in tiny spheres too small to see with the naked eye.
ss  sea  intriguetech 
12 weeks ago by seaugust
This amazing fabric can change its color on demand
Now fashion designers will be able to modify your handbag or scarf to match the rest of your outfit, thanks to a new fabric dubbed ChroMorphous.
ss  intriguetech 
12 weeks ago by seaugust
Vayyar’s 72-Transceiver Radar Chip Sees Just Enough But Not Too Much
Because some of these wavelengths let it see through walls, a single chip can cover a whole apartment. The 72-transceiver system can tell people and pets from everything else in an apartment, but it can’t identify them as individuals. It can determine their rough location and body position (standing, sitting, prone) but not the details of what they’re doing.
ss  intriguetech 
may 2018 by seaugust
Vayyar unveils a new sensor for capturing your life in 3D
The technology is currently being used in multiple applications across a wide range of sectors, including construction, elderly care, breast cancer imaging, automotive, smart homes, retail, robotics, and more.
ss  intriguetech 
may 2018 by seaugust
Samsung folding, transparent smartphone patents reveal major details
Based on the patent details, this won’t be a simple hinge, but rather a full system that includes a sensor for enabling the bend. The user will place their finger on the sensor to bend the hinge to what may be preset configurations. A sensor and controller will detect when the phone is bent and to what degree, translating to changes on the display.
ss  intriguetech 
may 2018 by seaugust
New smart wall lets you control your home with swipes, taps
All that's needed to create a "Wall ++" surface is some electronic gear and conductive paint, according to the researchers. The total cost of materials is estimated to be $20 per square meter.
ss  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
Inexpensive touch-sensitive paper instantly digitizes written notes
Researchers have introduced a new touch-sensitive paper that can track input and automatically digitize it. The system involves conductive film and a carbon-loaded paint applied to paper, among other things. The end result is a type of paper that detects touches from both fingers and writing instruments, transforming the process of digitizing handwritten content.
ss  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
Stick-on Displays: Bendy 2D Semiconductor is Fast Enough to Drive OLED Pixels
One of the great things about 2D semiconductors like molybdenum disulfide is that they bend easily. They also allow electrons to zip through them pretty quickly. And, unsurprisingly, since they are only about an atom thick, they are transparent. That combination makes them perfect for flexible OLED displays.
ss  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
Researchers achieve HD video streaming at 10,000 times lower power
"This work breaks that assumption and shows that backscatter can indeed support even full HD video."
ss  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
Thin film converts heat from electronics into energy
Nearly 70 percent of the energy produced in the United States each year is wasted as heat. Much of that heat is less than 100 degrees Celsius and emanates from things like computers, cars or large industrial processes. Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a thin-film system that can be applied to sources of waste heat like these to produce energy at levels unprecedented for this kind of technology.
ss  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles
A patent has been filed on the specific mutant enzyme by the Portsmouth researchers and those from the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado.
ss  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
Yarn-like Rechargeable Zinc Battery Could Power Smart Clothes and Wearables
Researchers have shaped a rechargeable zinc-ion battery into an elastic yarn that churns out power when bent, stretched, washed with water, and even cut.
ss  power  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
This AlterEgo wearable can hear your silent speech
Currently, the myoneural interface can deliver more than 90-percent accuracy in picking up silent speech, though that’s based on an application-specific vocabulary. It’s not an instant process, either, and require individual training, though the MIT team says it’s currently working on versions that would require no personalization. Also on the cards is a less obvious form-factor.
ss  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
Self-Powered Image Sensor Could Watch You Forever
Engineers at University of Michigan have recently come up with just that, an image sensor that does both things well enough to capture 15 images per second powered only by the daylight falling on it.
ss  intriguetech 
april 2018 by seaugust
Less than half a millimeter thick, the new flexi-LCD design could revolutionize printed media.
"Now we have three colours but for full colour we need to make the pixels too small for human eyes to see," Sun said.
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
Researchers create anti-bacterial surface coating inspired by dragonflies
In a news release on Wednesday (Mar 28), A*STAR said that studies have shown that the wings of these insects are covered in tiny structures called nanopillars, making them look like a bed of nails. When bacteria come into contact with these surfaces, their cell membranes get ripped apart immediately and they are killed.
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
IBM’s New Computer Is the Size of a Grain of Salt and Costs Less Than 10 Cents
The 1 millimeter x 1 millimeter device was unveiled at the computing giant’s IBM Think 2018 conference. Despite its diminutive size, the company claims the computer has the same amount of power as an x86 chip from 1990, which The Verge points out means it’s probably just about powerful enough to play the computer game Doom.
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
BioLumic raises $5 million to harness ultraviolet light to improve crop yields
“BioLumic is the only company using light as an ag treatment at the beginning of a plant’s life. Exposure to a short-duration treatment of UV-enriched light at a critical stage in a plant’s development turns on characteristics to help the seed or seedling more effectively defend itself against disease or pest attacks and more efficiently use water and nutrients from the soil for its entire lifespan.”
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
TypingDNA launches Chrome extension that verifies your identity based on typing
Popa said TypingDNA measures two key aspects of your typing: How long it takes you to reach a key and how long you keep the key pressed down. Apparently these patterns are unique; Popa showed me that the system could tell the difference between his typing and mine, and you can test it out for yourself on the TypingDNA website.
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
Nanowood is a cheap, green alternative to harmful styrofoam
This product is made using cellulose nanofibrils, the end result being a strong, lightweight, thermally insulating material.
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
This Smart Paint Talks To Canes To Help People Who Are Blind Navigate
The crosswalk on a road in front of the Ohio State School for the Blind looks like one that might be found at any intersection. But the white stripes at the edges are made with “smart paint”–and if a student who is visually impaired crosses while using a cane with a new smart tip, the cane will vibrate when it touches the lines.
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
No Refrigeration Necessary: New Tech for Everlasting Shelf-Life
Scientists are experimenting with everything from microwave sterilization to blasts of plasma to ensure food stays appetizing longer—even without refrigeration.
ss  grocery  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
Levi’s Project F.L.X. moves jeans manufacturing into the 21st century
Project F.L.X. will reduce the time to market and help Levi’s start on a path that will see the elimination of “thousands of chemical formulations” from jeans finishing. Levi’s says that the new finishing will deliver a cleaner jean that still meets Levi’s standard of craftsmanship. [video = https://youtu.be/SMDlbNpE6dU ]
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
Finally, a Likely Explanation for the “Sonic Weapon” Used at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba
Fu is careful to offer a caveat: “Of course, we don’t know for certain this was the cause. But bad engineering just seems much more likely than a sonic weapon.”
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
Graphene-based edible electronics will let you make cereal circuits
Researchers at the have successfully etched edible circuits onto the surface of food, paving the way for RFID tagged edibles that can help us track food from farm to tummy. The project, which uses something called laser-induced graphene (LIG), is a process that creates a “foam made out of tiny cross-linked graphene flakes” that can carry electricity through carbon-rich products like bread, potatoes, and cardboard.
ss  intriguetech 
march 2018 by seaugust
This UV Light Can Kill Flu Viruses Without Harming Humans
David Brenner, director of CUIMC, said, “If our results are confirmed in other settings, it follows that the use of overhead low-level far-UVC light in public locations would be a safe and efficient method for limiting the transmission and spread of airborne-mediated microbial diseases.”
ss  intriguetech  health 
february 2018 by seaugust
Researchers Develop a File System for DNA-Based Storage
Now, a team from Microsoft Research and the University of Washington may have cracked the code to make DNA a viable storage medium.
ss  intriguetech  futurist 
february 2018 by seaugust
Computers aid discovery of new, inexpensive material to make LEDs with high color quality
"It's not only remarkable that we were able to predict a new phosphor compound, but one that's stable and can actually be synthesized in the lab," said Zhenbin Wang, a nanoengineering Ph.D. candidate in Ong's research group and co-first author of the study.
ss  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
Self-healing electronic skin will help robots have a sense of touch like humans
That’s right, folks: In the future, when they take care of our children and the elderly, robots may be wrapped in an electronic skin that imitates our own, ensuring that they don’t accidentally kill your loved one with too much or too little force. The same concept can be applied to prosthetics: When an artificial limb is wrapped in e-skin, it can theoretically sense when something is too hot or too cold, or if more or less pressure needs to be exerted on an object.
ss  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, robotics
For now, the work has been contained to a laboratory, and researchers are hoping to find a suitable commercial use. A provisional patent was filed in December 2017.
ss  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
MIT’s new chip could bring neural nets to battery-powered gadgets
MIT researchers have developed a chip designed to speed up the hard work of running neural networks, while also reducing the power consumed when doing so dramatically – by up to 95 percent, in fact. The basic concept involves simplifying the chip design so that shuttling of data between different processors on the same chip is taken out of the equation.
ss  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
Scientists create “super wood” offering strength and toughness of steel
The team believes that the new treatment method makes wood a competitor to steel or titanium allows. The team says it’s also comparable in strength and toughness to carbon fiber while being much cheaper.
ss  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
Sheerly Genius launches indestructible pantyhose made with fiber found in bulletproof vests
Sheerly Genius is currently taking pre-orders at $79 a pair for shipment this fall.
ss  fashion  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
Pivotal Commware Will Start Selling Its Software-Defined Antenna for Holographic Beamforming This Year
“It’s basically putting a megaphone in front of your mouth,” explains Brian Deutsch, CEO of Pivotal Commware, “it’s harnessing and focusing the energy in one direction.”
ss  wireless  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
Putting Glasses on Praying Mantis Reveals New Form of 3D Vision
Of course, there’s still plenty of work to do before we understand how to implement mantis vision as a computer algorithm. That’s something Newcastle researchers are already working on.
ss  eyes  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
The Princess Leia project: ‘volumetric’ 3D images that float in ‘thin air’
How soon? “I won’t make a prediction on exact timing but if we make as much progress in the next four years as we did in the last four years (a big ‘if’), then we would have a display of usable size by the end of that period.
ss  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
MIT Researchers Create Color-Shifting Ink for 3D Printers
The CSAIL team measured how long it would take for the ink to reset from ambient light, finding it degraded conscientiously, but was still visible after 30 days. A more intense light source can be used to manually reset the dye in a few minutes so you can re-color it. The team hopes to make ColorFab faster and more efficient to make it a viable product.
ss  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
Japanese farmers created a new kind of banana with an edible peel
This bizarre method of production is called “freeze thaw awakening,” and results in a banana with a perfectly edible—even delicious—peel. The fruit—called the Mongee banana—is now available in extremely small, 10-banana batches sold each week in a regional Japanese retail outlet called Tenmanya Okayama. The fruit go for a whopping $6 per banana.
ss  grocery  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
A Beam-Steering Antenna for 5G Mobile Phones
Now researchers from the Shanghai Institute for Advanced Communication and Data Science at Shanghai University in China have developed a 28 Gigahertz (GHz) beam-steering antenna array that can be integrated into the metallic casing of 5G mobile phones.
ss  intriguetech 
february 2018 by seaugust
Darpa Wants to Build an Image Search Engine out of DNA
And it’s hard to see how you’d get a soup of small molecule reactions crammed under the hood of your smartphone. But it’s fun to at least imagine that years from now the Department of Defense might be building underground bunkers, not for server farms, but for trays of microscopic glass beads; a nation’s secrets held in freeze-dried DNA.
ss  intriguetech  futurist 
january 2018 by seaugust
Self-repairing ceramic eyed for aircraft engines, Shinkansen
The team from the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and Yokohama National University said the material could be used in plane engines to keep them operating even if they are damaged in collisions with airborne objects.
ss  intriguetech 
january 2018 by seaugust
Vayyar can detect if someone in your home stops breathing
Vayyar has partnered with Japan’s SoftBank to collaborate in the Internet of Things. The sensors can detect things that cameras cannot, such as smoke, poor lighting, fire, flooding, and more.
ss  intriguetech 
january 2018 by seaugust
Graphene-based wearable may revolutionize infant health monitoring
A newly developed technology could change that, though, using conducting liquid emulsions. The liquid has been detailed in paper published today in the Nanoscale journal from the Royal Society of Chemistry; inspiration for it came from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s plea for cheap wearable tech that can track babies’ health... The tracking technology could be built into infant sleepwear, making it possible to track the baby’s pulse and breathing without using the big devices currently used; these are attached to the hands and/or feet and are less than ideal.
ss  intriguetech  health  wearable 
january 2018 by seaugust
New Polymer Could Lead to Phone Screen That Heals When Cracked
Clearly, everyone’s hoping this technology can be used in phone screens. There’s still a lot that could go wrong before that happens, though. The polymer needs to optically clear enough to have a display under it, and we don’t know anything about its resistance to scratches. The polymer may also prove too expensive to produce in large volumes for phone screens. That’s what doomed sapphire glass production for smartphone screens. Even if it costs a bit more, some people might prefer that to paying for a screen repair.
ss  intriguetech 
december 2017 by seaugust
A new low-cost, simple way to measure medical vital signs with radio waves
The RFID tags measure internal body motion, such as a heart as it beats or blood as it pulses under skin. Powered remotely by electromagnetic energy supplied by a central reader, the tags use a new concept called “near-field coherent sensing.” Mechanical motions (heartbeat, etc.) in the body modulate (modify) radio waves that are bounced off the body and internal organs by passive (no battery required) RFID tags.
ss  intriguetech  health 
december 2017 by seaugust
Nanotextured surface kills bacteria without hurting mammalian cells
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created an electrochemical etching process that can be used on common stainless steel alloy that is able to kill bacteria without hurting mammalian cells. The team believes that the process may one day be used to prevent microbial attack on implantable medical devices and food processing equipment.
ss  intriguetech 
december 2017 by seaugust
3D-Printed Plastic Objects Send Data Over Wi-Fi Without Any Electronics
The printed sensor doesn’t need to actually connect to your Wi-Fi network to transmit data. Instead, it reflects ambient wireless signals in a way that can be detected by a Wi-Fi receiver. This “backscatter” signal is decoded by a device like a phone or computer to determine how fast the gear is spinning.
ss  intriguetech  wireless 
december 2017 by seaugust
Watch Ultrahaptics use ultrasound to let you feel imaginary objects
The startup has raised around $38 million to bring the ultrasound technology to market. It could eventually be built into VR headsets or tabletop models.
ss  intriguetech 
december 2017 by seaugust
MIT and Harvard create soft robot muscles that can lift 1,000x its weight
The scientists have devised a new way to outfit the soft robots with more strength and this is accomplished by fitting the soft robots with rigid origami skeletons... Soft robotics are a big deal and have multiple potential usage scenarios, particularly in warehouses and logistics operations where they are able to handle fragile objects. Soft robotics are also useful in picking up objects with an irregular shape.
ss  robots  intriguetech 
november 2017 by seaugust
This AI algorithm probably means the end of high-end art forgeries
In the mid-1900s, art historian Maurits Michel van Dantzig developed a system to identify artists by their brush or pen strokes, which he called Pictology. Dantzig found shape, length, direction, and pressure all contributed to a kind of stroke signature, unique to each artist.
ss  intriguetech  AI  inthing-done 
november 2017 by seaugust
New motion sensors a major step toward low-cost, high-performance wearable technology
These new buckypaper sensors represent a marked improvement on current industry standards, with most sensors being either too crude or too inflexible to reliably monitor complex structures like the human body.
ss  intriguetech 
november 2017 by seaugust
Darkest material on Earth will create a 'schism in space' for Winter Olympics
That's because Vantablack is not a color, it's the almost complete absence of color. Since this super black material was first developed by Surrey NanoSystems three years ago, the British firm has been flooded with inquiries from designers, architects and aerospace engineers -- and even people who want to wrap themselves in it or eat it. Part of the appeal of Vantablack is that it absorbs 99.96% of the light that hits its surface.
ss  intriguetech  inthing-done 
november 2017 by seaugust
Early Qualcomm Server CPU Benchmarks Could Mean Big Trouble for Intel
But while these numbers aren’t a knockout blow, Chipzilla will be paying serious attention nonetheless. Data centers, AI, cloud, and machine learning workloads are all critical to Intel’s future, and the x86 manufacturer isn’t going to cede ground to Qualcomm (or AMD) without a furious fight.
ss  intriguetech 
november 2017 by seaugust
This internet-connected block of wood is also the most elegant smart home display
Mui was created by Kyoto-based company Nissha, which specializes in capacitative touch sensors, most recently used in the Nintendo Switch. It works with Philips Hue light bulbs and Net LED, with more smart light integrations to come. It’s just a prototype for now, so the companion app to control the lights, and IFTTT and Alexa integrations are still in development. Currently, it uses myThings, an Internet of Things service by Yahoo Japan.
ss  intriguetech 
november 2017 by seaugust
Startup Wiliot Promises No-Battery Bluetooth Beacons in 2019
Wiliot’s goal is to begin selling fingernail-size devices in 2019 that are as thin as a sheet of paper and cost less than $1. Such a device, it says, would be able to receive and transmit Bluetooth messages and do some limited computing using only ambient RF energy.
ss  intriguetech  wireless 
november 2017 by seaugust
Latest ‘SOFT’ textiles use built-in sensors that could save your life
The latest sensor technology has led us to creating a new type of smart textile that can alert you when it detects hazardous materials on it. Those working with the most dangerous of materials will soon get added protection thanks to the latest developments in fabric technology from Dartmouth College in the US.
ss  intriguetech 
november 2017 by seaugust
New "Ultrasound on a Chip" Tool Could Revolutionize Medical Imaging
Today, Rothberg’s startup Butterfly Network unveiled the tool and announced its FDA clearance for 13 clinical applications, including cardiac scans, fetal and obstetric exams, and musculoskeletal checks. Rather than using a dedicated piece of hardware for the controls and image display, the iQ works with the user’s iPhone. The company says it will start shipping units in 2018 at an initial price of about $2,000.
intriguetech  ss  health  inthing-done 
october 2017 by seaugust
Pixel 2 teardown shows unusual waterproofing method
Nelson discovered the presence of dielectric grease around the rubber ring of the USC-C port. This icky insulating material is often used to waterproof the electronics of off-road vehicles.
ss  intriguetech 
october 2017 by seaugust
AdHawk’s tiny sensors could enable much smaller VR headsets and AR glasses
The Kitchener, Canada-based company has raised $4.6 million in a funding round led by Intel. AdHawk Microsystems said that its smaller, faster, more power-efficient motion-tracking solutions will render camera-based eye tracking obsolete. And they will pave the way for a new generation of highly immersive AR/VR experiences.
ss  intriguetech 
october 2017 by seaugust
Microwave breakthrough helps boost hard drive sizes
The data-storing abilities of hard drives could soon swell to 40 terabytes (TB) and beyond, says Western Digital.
ss  intriguetech 
october 2017 by seaugust
Intel’s new 17-qubit chip marches toward the quantum computing future
Today that all changes, with Intel announcing the delivery of a new 17-qubit to QuTech, a move it says “demonstrates the fast progress Intel and QuTech are making in researching and developing a working quantum computing system.”
ss  intriguetech 
october 2017 by seaugust
MIT Wizards Invent Tech That Sees Around Corners
Your eyes can’t see it, but there’s a lot going on in this penumbra: It’s a reflection—a real-time, low-res view of the scene around the corner. This happens outdoors, too, thanks to light from the sun. Train a camera on this spot and magnify the color, and you can start to pick out different-colored pixels that correspond to objects otherwise obscured by the wall.
ss  intriguetech 
october 2017 by seaugust
Infrared Light Promises Ultrafast Wireless Communications
The proposed system uses infrared antennas to steer light beams toward connected devices, and reaches a bitrate of 112 gigabits per second (Gb/s). Standard Wi-Fi routers, by contrast, provide only tens or hundreds of megabits per second, roughly a thousand times smaller. And while multiple devices have to share a Wi-Fi router’s bandwidth, every device using the infrared system gets its own dedicated 112-Gb/s connection.
ss  intriguetech  wireless 
october 2017 by seaugust
Alexa is about to disappear into other devices, thanks to a new technology
XMOS has the first far-field linear array to support Alexa, meaning Alexa could melt into the background. The linear array is the first Alexa-qualified solution for things that have flat panels or sit against the wall — like about 90 percent of the technology in your home. It means a future of accessing voice services via devices which are accessible and inconspicuous.
ss  ears  intriguetech 
october 2017 by seaugust
Efinix’s Programmable Chips Could Push AI Out to the Edges
The startup, based in Santa Clara, Calif., plans to deliver a new kind of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) technology that is about one-quarter the size of comparable chips, consumes half the power, and is considerably less complex to construct.
ss  intriguetech 
october 2017 by seaugust
Google’s next revolution may cut the touchscreen altogether
The smart device with the abilities Google described in this patent will be able to interpret gestures the user has made up themselves.
ss  intriguetech 
september 2017 by seaugust
Intel Unveils Neuromorphic, Self-Learning Chip Codenamed Loihi
The company has announced a new neuromorphic chip, codenamed Loihi, designed for AI and deep learning workloads. Intel’s Dr. Michael Mayberry claims that Loihi does not need to be trained in the traditional way and that it takes a new approach to this type of computing by using asynchronous spiking.
ss  intriguetech 
september 2017 by seaugust
LG’s flexible OLED lamps aim to make lightbulbs obsolete
This is the dawn of the curved light – and almost certainly the precursor to the fully flexible full room smart lighting system as an everyday occurrence.
ss  intriguetech 
september 2017 by seaugust
MIT’s The Engine raises $200M to fund ‘tough tech’
In addition to the new fund, The Engine is announcing its first seven investments: Analytical Space. Baseload Renewables. C2Sense. iSee. Kytopen. Suono Bio. Via Separations.
ss  intriguetech 
september 2017 by seaugust
Douxmatok lets you use 30 percent less sugar without affecting sweetness
DouxMatok has developed a carrier system for sugar that makes the sugar molecule travel straight to the sweetness receptors on your taste buds and stay there as long as possible, increasing the efficacy of sugar within your diet.
ss  intriguetech  inthing-done 
september 2017 by seaugust
Nike’s New Flyleather Brings Cow Skin Into the 21st Century
While traditional leather-makers discard parts of the hide that are blemished or too soft and stretchy, Nike takes those pieces and grinds them into a fine dust before combining it with polyester fabric and water.
ss  intriguetech  inthing-done 
september 2017 by seaugust
Low-Power Devices Use Backscatter to Transmit Data Several Kilometers
That group plans to commercialize its technology through a startup called Jeeva Wireless, and expects to have a commercial backscatter system for sale within six months.
ss  intriguetech  wireless 
september 2017 by seaugust
Digging deep into the brain of the iPhone X
“We’re thinking ahead, I’ll tell you that, and I don’t think we’ll be limited,” and then he added, almost as a post-script, “It’s getting harder.”
ss  intriguetech 
september 2017 by seaugust
This tiny sensor could sleep for years between detection events
The idea is that you could put a few of these things in, say, the miles of tunnels underneath a decommissioned nuclear power plant or a mining complex, but not have to wire them all for electricity. But as soon as something appears, it’s seen and transmitted immediately. The power requirements would have to be almost nil, of course, which is why DARPA called the program Near Zero Power RF and Sensor Operation.
ss  intriguetech 
september 2017 by seaugust
Continental concept tires uses conductive rubber to warn drivers of damage
The two concept technologies include the ContiSense and the ContiAdapt and both are very different technologies though both aim to make tires safer and more comfortable in the future.
ss  intriguetech  transport 
september 2017 by seaugust
This new solid-state thermal vision sensor could improve self-driving tech
AdaSky’s solution is called “Viper,” and it works by passively collecting FIR [far infrared] signals sent out as heat by warm objects, including other cars and humans. Its range means that it can pick up signals from as many as a few hundred meters away, allowing it to detect pedestrians earlier than other sensors, and work in concert with different tech including LiDAR and traditional cameras to verify that pedestrians are in fact pedestrians ahead of time.
ss  transport  intriguetech  eyes 
september 2017 by seaugust
Origami-inspired clothing range that grows with your child wins Dyson award
The London-based postgraduate student [Ryan Yasin] aims to make so-called Petit Pli “the most advanced kids’ clothing in the world”. It is made from distinctive pleated lightweight fabric which is waterproof, machine washable and recyclable, with all garments fitting the three-month to three-year age group.
ss  fashion  intriguetech  civic  inthing-done 
september 2017 by seaugust
What It Takes to Be an Expert Human Echolocator | WIRED
But Kish says he’s all for more devices—and more research. “We know that these signals are critical to the echolocation process. Bats use them. Whales use them. Humans use them. It makes sense that those signals should be studied, understood, optimized.” With the help of models like Thaler’s, Kish might just get his wish.
ss  sea  health  intriguetech  inthing-done 
august 2017 by seaugust
'Learning database' speeds queries from hours to seconds
University of Michigan researchers developed software called Verdict that enables existing databases to learn from each query a user submits, finding accurate answers without trawling through the same data again and again. Verdict allows databases to deliver answers more than 200 times faster while maintaining 99 percent accuracy. In a research environment, that could mean getting answers in seconds instead of hours or days.
ss  intriguetech 
august 2017 by seaugust
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