seansharp + read   523

Impeach Trump Now - The Atlantic
Starting the process will rein in a president who is undermining American ideals—and bring the debate about his fitness for office into Congress, where it belongs.
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3 days ago by seansharp
How Governments React to Climate Change: An Interview with the Political Theorists Joel Wainwright and Geoff Mann | The New Yorker
On New Year’s Day, the far-right populist Jair Bolsonaro took power in Brazil, posing an urgent threat to Brazilians and to the planet.
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7 days ago by seansharp
The Art of Decision-Making | The New Yorker
In July of 1838, Charles Darwin was twenty-nine years old and single. Two years earlier, he had returned from his voyage aboard H.M.S. Beagle with the observations that would eventually form the basis of “On the Origin of Species.” In the meantime, he faced a more pressing analytical problem.
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7 days ago by seansharp
Trump’s Great Diversion Cant Last Much Longer | The New Yorker
One of the victims of Donald Trump’s Presidency is history, even very recent history. Caught up in the maelstrom of daily, and even hourly, headlines, it is difficult to remember last week, let alone last month or last year.
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10 days ago by seansharp
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Takes the Democrats Back to the Future: An Interview with the Historian Rick Perlstein | The New Yorker
This month, Democrats took control of the U.S. House of Representatives, after their sweeping electoral victory in November.
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11 days ago by seansharp
The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
The Future Book was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling.
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11 days ago by seansharp
“Vice” vs. the Real Dick Cheney | The New Yorker
Adam McKay, the director of “Vice,” has an exuberant and fantastic filmmaking style that inoculates him against the kind of indignant fact-checking to which Hollywood depictions of history are often subjected.
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15 days ago by seansharp
The Philosopher Redefining Equality | The New Yorker
American stories trace the sweep of history, but their details are definingly particular. In the summer of 1979, Elizabeth Anderson, then a rising junior at Swarthmore College, got a job as a bookkeeper at a bank in Harvard Square.
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20 days ago by seansharp
Elizabeth Warren’s Theory of Everything | The New Republic
The Massachusetts senator is pitching her campaign as a war on corruption in the broadest sense.
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20 days ago by seansharp
Radical Centrists Will Decide the Democratic Primary | The New Republic
As a scrum of candidates battles for the leftist vote, a dark horse could win the nomination simply by standing out from the crowd.
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20 days ago by seansharp
Trump’s shutdown is because the wall is a bad idea - Vox
Spending billions of dollars to build hundreds of miles of additional walling — or “steel slats” or whatever you want to call it — on the US-Mexico border is a bad idea.
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22 days ago by seansharp
Is Trump’s Plan for Syria a Withdrawal or a Surrender? | The New Yorker
On Saturday, I spoke with a senior U.S. official at a conference in the Middle East and asked if I could meet up with American troops in Syria sometime in the spring. He replied affirmatively.
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4 weeks ago by seansharp
How Much Trust Can Facebook Afford to Lose? | The New Yorker
What is the price of trust? Or, to put the question another way, what is the cost of becoming known for doing things that don’t match your words? To put a number on that, Tony Simons, a management professor at Cornell, took an unusually detailed look inside the hotel industry.
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4 weeks ago by seansharp
Escape From the Trump Cult | The New Republic
On December 20, 1954, some 62 years before Donald Trump would be sworn in as president of the United States, Dorothy Martin and dozens of her followers crowded into her home in Chicago to await the apocalypse.
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5 weeks ago by seansharp
Should We Be Worried About Computerized Facial Recognition? | The New Yorker
Stephen Lawlor and David Hunt have witnessed a lot of bullying. Among the principal victims, in their experience, are young, first-time mothers, who are sometimes so intimidated that they’re unable to eat.
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5 weeks ago by seansharp
Imperialist in Chief: A Critical History of George H. W. Bush’s War on Iraq
The U.S. media haven’t been shy about lionizing the late President George H. W. Bush in their reflections on his life and legacy. This behavior is hardly surprising; we saw the same worship of the late Republican Senator John McCain via the erasure of any discussion of U.S.
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6 weeks ago by seansharp
Starbucks-app rewards superfans can’t stop racking up “Star Dashes.”
The first Friday in November was an important day for Starbucks. It was the first of the company’s annual holiday season, anticipated by the Starbucks loyal each year and marked by the launch of Peppermint Mochas and seasonal red cups, among other festive offerings.
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8 weeks ago by seansharp
Nationalism vs. patriotism: Trump’s “nationalism” is not what makes him radical.
Donald Trump finally came out as a nationalist last month. The president thrilled the crowd at a Ted Cruz rally by declaring, “You know what I am? I’m a nationalist, OK? I’m a nationalist. Nationalist! Use that word! Use that word!” Reactions were predictable.
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8 weeks ago by seansharp
Despite growing number of atheists, Americans still fearful
America's religiosity is not as clean-cut as advertised. While we were certainly not founded as a "Christian nation," Dionysian chaos didn't reign supreme either.
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9 weeks ago by seansharp
Deval Patrick’s Presidential Prospects | The New Yorker
On Election Night last week, Deval Patrick, the former governor of Massachusetts, went out to dinner with his wife, Diane, near their apartment, in Boston’s Back Bay. They propped up their iPads on the table, trying to synchronize their schedules after a hectic couple of months.
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9 weeks ago by seansharp
The Post-Midterms Dangers of Donald Trump | The New Yorker
Shortly before President Trump, at a press conference last Wednesday, derided a CNN reporter as a “terrible person,” he claimed, briefly, to be out of touch with his emotions.
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10 weeks ago by seansharp
Why Doctors Hate Their Computers | The New Yorker
On a sunny afternoon in May, 2015, I joined a dozen other surgeons at a downtown Boston office building to begin sixteen hours of mandatory computer training. We sat in three rows, each of us parked behind a desktop computer.
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10 weeks ago by seansharp
“We’ll Be Further Apart as a Country”: Trump, the Midterm Elections, and Why the Really Crazy Times May Just Be Beginning | The New Yorker
The results of the 2018 midterm elections were both predictable and predicted, although that wasn’t how it seemed when Nancy Pelosi started Election Day by telling reporters that Democrats would absolutely win control of the House of Representatives.
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10 weeks ago by seansharp
The Night Before the Midterms, Democrats Appear to Be Gaining Ground Against Trump | The New Yorker
As Donald Trump left the White House on Monday for his final three campaign rallies of this electoral season, he said, “There is a great electricity in the air . . . like we haven’t seen since, in my opinion, the ’16 election.
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11 weeks ago by seansharp
An Aging Marathoner Tries to Run Fast After 40 | WIRED
Running is the most elemental sport. The equipment is simple: shoes, socks, shorts, shirt. The activity is natural. We once ran after antelopes on the savannah, and we now run around playgrounds as kids. For the most part, we compete against ourselves.
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11 weeks ago by seansharp
Paul Ryan Wrote His Own Obituary, and It’s Delusional | The New Republic
Ever since he announced his retirement in April, Speaker Paul Ryan has largely avoided the limelight, emerging now and then to repel another far-right rebellion in the House or gently criticize President Donald Trump over the latest outrage (such as opposing birthright citizenship).
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11 weeks ago by seansharp
The Case Against Running With Headphones - The New York Times
In an excerpt from his new book, the NPR host Peter Sagal writes: “If I don’t leave my headphones behind when I run, I wouldn’t spend a single minute of my waking life free from input.”In my long years of running long distances, I have made great use of headphones and iPods.
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11 weeks ago by seansharp
The Republican Party Is Only Going to Get More Extreme
Politics since Donald Trump’s election has felt like a static state of misery, as the president’s approval ratings have been surprisingly stable and the only apparent variable has been each party’s chances of gaining or consolidating power in the midterms.
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11 weeks ago by seansharp
American Democracy Is Malfunctioning in Tragic Fashion | The New Yorker
In his book “The American Mind,” from 1950, which I took down from the bookshelf during the weekend, the historian Henry Steele Commager notes that “the American” of the late nineteenth century had “little time for tradition and authority,” because “he knew that his country had become
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11 weeks ago by seansharp
Tribalism Isn’t Our Democracy’s Problem. The GOP Is.
A pernicious force was hollowing out American democracy. It had neutered Congress, and lobotomized the electorate. Lawmakers had become incapable of taking action on many of the day’s most pressing issues — and voters incapable of holding their representatives accountable for their incapacity.
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october 2018 by seansharp
Historian Christopher Browning on the Trump regime: We’re “close to the point of no return” | Salon.com
History can teach us many lessons about Donald Trump and his rise to power. As shown by his deeds, words and policies, Trump is an authoritarian and a demagogue who has, so far, been restrained by America's weakened democratic institutions and norms.
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october 2018 by seansharp
George Scialabba, Radical Democrat | The New Republic
It may strike a reader new to George Scialabba’s writing as extraordinary that Slouching Toward Utopia, a new collection of his essays and reviews, is not a response to Donald Trump’s presidency.
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october 2018 by seansharp
My Private Oval Office Press Conference With Donald Trump
“I haven’t been to Washington my whole life. Probably never slept over. All of a sudden, I’m president of the United States,” Trump said. Around 12:20 p.m. on Tuesday, I was on my way out of the White House after a series of meetings in the West Wing.
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october 2018 by seansharp
Democratic Socialists of America national director Maria Svart on the DSA’s mission.
One of the most surprising things about the Democratic Socialists of America is that there are democratic socialists in America. That was perhaps under the radar until Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez started making headlines.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Yuval Noah Harari: the myth of freedom | Books | The Guardian
Governments and corporations will soon know you better than you know yourself. Belief in the idea of ‘free will’ has become dangerous
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september 2018 by seansharp
The Plot to Subvert an Election: Unraveling the Russia Story So Far - The New York Times
On an October afternoon before the 2016 election, a huge banner was unfurled from the Manhattan Bridge in New York City: Vladimir V. Putin against a Russian-flag background, and the unlikely word “Peacemaker” below. It was a daredevil happy birthday to the Russian president, who was turning 64.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Opinion | The Hacking of America - The New York Times
Every government is a machine, and every machine has its tinkerers — and its jams. From the start, machines have driven American democracy and, just as often, crippled it.
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september 2018 by seansharp
The Deceptive Contrast Between Trump and Kavanaugh | The New Yorker
The past week in Washington offered what appeared to be a startling contrast: on the one hand, tales of a President unhinged, issuing garbled, contradictory commands to appalled aides who were conspiring against him; on the other, a thoughtful Supreme Court nominee, calmly parrying the futile assaul
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september 2018 by seansharp
Alex Honnold Climbs Halfway Up a New Jersey Skyscraper | The New Yorker
At twelve-forty-five on Thursday night, unable to sleep, the climber Alex Honnold got out of bed, picked up his backpack, and walked across the street from his hotel in Jersey City, New Jersey, to a sixty-nine-floor luxury apartment building called the Urby.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Can Mark Zuckerberg Fix Facebook Before It Breaks Democracy? | The New Yorker
At ten o’clock on a weekday morning in August, Mark Zuckerberg, the chairman and C.E.O. of Facebook, opened the front door of his house in Palo Alto, California, wearing the tight smile of obligation. He does not enjoy interviews, especially after two years of ceaseless controversy.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Swiss Air Flight 111 Plane Crash History - Long Fall of One-Eleven Heavy
This story was originally published in the July 2000 issue of Esquire. It was summer; it was winter. The village disappeared behind skeins of fog. Fishermen came and went in boats named Reverence, Granite Prince, Souwester.
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september 2018 by seansharp
The Anonymous New York Times Op-Ed and the Trumpian Corruption of Language and the Media | The New Yorker
Let’s get the obvious points out of the way first: the anonymous Op-Ed published by the Times on Wednesday was a ploy by someone who wants to distance himself from what he perceives to be an imperilled Administration, while capitalizing on whatever credibility and popularity the Presidency still r
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september 2018 by seansharp
Why the Anonymous Trump Official’s Op-Ed in the New York Times Matters | The New Yorker
There’s a long tradition of anonymous writers influencing American politics, and after the Times published an Op-Ed written by an unnamed “senior official” in the Trump Administration, on Wednesday, I thought of two in particular. In 1947, “Mr.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Song Exploder | The Decemberists
The Decemberists are a Grammy-nominated five-piece band from Portland, Oregon. They released their first album in 2001, and since then they’ve put out seven more, including the 2018 album I’ll Be Your Girl.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Paris Review - Jim Harrison, The Art of Fiction No. 104
This interview was conducted over a five-day period in mid-October of 1986 at Jim Harrison’s farm in Leelanau County, Michigan.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Leadville 100: There Will Be Blood. And Llamas. Again. - YouTube
My cheesy, bloody, llama-tinged homage to the 2018 Leadville 100 Trail Run. That's 7 buckles in 7 years, but it wasn't pretty. Many thanks to my pacers, John Rainey, George Zack and Lesley Cortright. And my crew, they patched me up and got me to the finish in under 30 hours. 5 falls this year .
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september 2018 by seansharp
Why Teachers Are Walking Out – Known.
For the last ten years, I’ve been a covert operative in Women’s World, a.k.a. Public School.  I am not a typical elementary teacher.  I am male.
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september 2018 by seansharp
It Would Take Only a Single Senator to Check Trump - The Atlantic
The last part of the post concerned the main, and depressing, area where second thoughts were necessary.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Congressional Republicans Are Failing the Test of Trump - The Atlantic
In late January 2018, 12 months into the Donald Trump era, the military scholar Eliot Cohen looked back at an assessment he had written for The Atlantic in late January 2017, soon after Trump was sworn in.
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september 2018 by seansharp
A Summer of Megafires and Trump’s Non-Rules on Climate Change | The New Yorker
The Ranch Fire broke out sometime on the morning of Friday, July 27th, east of Ukiah, California, in Mendocino County.
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september 2018 by seansharp
'Medicare for All' Is an Indulgent Fantasy - The Atlantic
“Medicare for All” is an enormously popular slogan, as evidenced by a slew of recent surveys.
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september 2018 by seansharp
France Takes On Cellphone Addiction With a Ban in Schools - WSJ
PARIS—Solal Paroux’s friends all have smartphones, and the 12-year-old Parisian has been needling his parents to get him one too. But his parents are resisting. And now they have the law on their side.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Why Kids Want Things - The Atlantic
When Marsha Richins started researching materialism in the early 1990s, it was a subject that had mostly been left to philosophers and religious thinkers.
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september 2018 by seansharp
Yuval Noah Harari on what 2050 has in store for humankind | WIRED UK
Forget programming - the best skill to teach children is reinvention. In this exclusive extract from his new book, the author of Sapiens reveals what 2050 has in store for humankind.
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august 2018 by seansharp
Andrew Gillum’s Campaign for Governor of Florida, and the Extent of the Progressive Revolution | The New Yorker
A few weeks ago, I met the liberal billionaire Tom Steyer at the W Boston hotel. Steyer has been playing a unique role in the midterm elections.
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august 2018 by seansharp
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Jump toSections of this pageAccessibility HelpPress alt + / to open this menu Connect with friends and the world around you on Facebook. See photos and updates from friends in News Feed. Share what's new in your life on your Timeline. Find more of what you're looking for with Facebook Search.
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august 2018 by seansharp
Lyme disease: How I came to blame Wall Street for my illness.
In August of 2017, I was diagnosed with Lyme disease. To be honest, I was surprised it took as long as it did for me to finally join the growing list of those who’ve contracted the nasty illness.
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august 2018 by seansharp
Brett Kavanagh has Ronald Reagan to thank for twisting the Supreme Court.
Despite President Donald Trump’s high disapproval rating, it’s almost a certain that his U.S. Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, will be confirmed to the high court.
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august 2018 by seansharp
Opinion | How Far America Has Fallen - The New York Times
The thing with every shocking revelation about Trump is that it's already baked into his image. I've never met a Trump supporter who did not know exactly who he is. RIDGWAY, Colo. — It’s different in the West. It’s easier to feel in touch with some essence of what America is.
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august 2018 by seansharp
Measuring Presidents’ Misdeeds  | The New Yorker
In May, 1974, John Doar, the special counsel to the House Judiciary Committee, called the Yale historian C. Vann Woodward into his office and asked him to figure out just how badly Presidents had behaved in the past, and how they had answered accusations against them.
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august 2018 by seansharp
Andrew Sullivan: Trump Is More Dangerous Than Ever
There was a sense among some this week that we had at last reached that golden “inflection point” when all of Trump’s lies, scams, cons, and crimes finally sink in with Republicans, and the cult begins to crack.
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august 2018 by seansharp
Take an Additional 20% off Select Insulation | Backcountry.com
Shop the Sale 214 Results FeaturedHighest RatedNew ArrivalsSortMore FeaturedHighest RatedNew ArrivalsLowest PriceHighest PricePercent Off sale from $119.37 $198.9540% off 14 colors available 4.5511 sale $244.30 - $349.00 5 colors available 4.5545 sale $149.40 - $249.
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august 2018 by seansharp
de Buyer Frypan | Huckberry
De Buyer, a trusted source of premium quality French cookware, has been at it since 1830, earning their stripes in high-class kitchens around the world.
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august 2018 by seansharp
The Moral Clarity of “Christopher Robin” | The New Yorker
In “The House at Pooh Corner,” A. A. Milne’s last book about Christopher Robin, the mop-haired boy bids farewell to Winnie-the-Pooh, the endearingly befuddled and honey-besotted bear. It is a bittersweet encounter.
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august 2018 by seansharp
The New Yorker
Get the writers you love, plus your favorite cartoons, on your phone or tablet. Download The New Yorker Today. » A rookie’s account of Vietnam in 1967 changed how we saw the war. And Maggie Haberman, of the New York Times, talks about the gang war inside the White House.
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august 2018 by seansharp
America Enters the Great Unknown | The New Republic
The United States may not quite be in a constitutional crisis, but it certainly feels like one.
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august 2018 by seansharp
How a Notorious Gangster Was Exposed by His Own Sister | The New Yorker
Astrid Holleeder has arresting eyes—they are swimming-pool blue—but that’s all I can reveal about her appearance, because she is in hiding, an exile in her own city, which is Amsterdam. For the past two years, she has lived in a series of furnished safe houses.
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august 2018 by seansharp
The New Yorker
The New Yorker Recommends: Our staff and contributors share their cultural enthusiasms. Both Donald Trump and Charles Koch appear to think that the Republican Party in particular, and American politics in general, should be theirs to dominate.
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august 2018 by seansharp
“Rigged Witch Hunt,” Meet Trump’s “Red Wave” | The New Yorker
Donald Trump’s Presidency is often described as a reality-show version of the White House, with Trump himself as the producer, director, and main character.
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august 2018 by seansharp
The Scientist Who Scrambled Darwin’s Tree of Life - The New York Times
On Nov. 3, 1977, a new scientific revolution was heralded to the world — but it came cryptically, in slightly confused form. The front page of that day’s New York Times carried a headline: “Scientists Discover a Form of Life That Predates Higher Organisms.
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august 2018 by seansharp
Spike Lee Does Battle with “BlacKkKlansman” | The New Yorker
At the end of “Malcolm X,” Spike Lee’s formidable bio-pic of 1992, we see a bunch of schoolkids, standing up in turn to announce, “I’m Malcolm X.” Thus is the hero of the film, played with charismatic self-command by Denzel Washington, presented as the Spartacus of his people.
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august 2018 by seansharp
How QAnon and Sacha Baron Cohen Speak to the Same Desperate Need | The New Yorker
Is there a way to explain what’s happening to us? Is there a theory, a secret, or a person capable of forcing our undulating reality to come into focus? Is there a way to feel stable on this careening ship of a country?
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august 2018 by seansharp
The Light in High Places
"A fine fresh gust of mountain air from the Wind Rivers and a wonderful book of elegies and celebrations of the beauty and resilience of wild nature, together with sketches of the dedicated few still fighting to offset the poor stewardship and folly of our greedy species.
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august 2018 by seansharp
getpocket.com
You've used the Pocket button to save a page from Pocket's website! Now that you know how to save to Pocket, it's time to venture out and build your own personal reading list.
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august 2018 by seansharp
The Day Donald Trump Told Us There Was Attempted Collusion with Russia | The New Yorker
August 5, 1974, was the day the Nixon Presidency ended. On that day, Nixon heeded a Supreme Court ruling and released the so-called smoking-gun tape, a recording of a meeting, held two years earlier, with his chief of staff, H. R. Haldeman.
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august 2018 by seansharp
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