rufous + via:daringfireball   4850

www.sqlprostudio.com
SQLPro Studio, the premier database client for macOS is now available on iOS. SQLPro supports MySQL, Postgres, and Microsoft SQL Server and allows you to quickly and easily access Tables, Views, and other database necessities from the palm of your hand. With must-have features such as full syntax highlighting, autocomplete, support for iPad Smart Keyboard and more, SQLPro is a must have app for developers.

Download SQLPro for iOS devices today for a free trial

You can also save 20% on any SQLPro app on macOS using the promo code GRUBER.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
2 hours ago by rufous
The Incomparable | Overture and Apes (Episode 431)
Speaking of Jason Snell, he was kind enough to invite me on The Incomparable — along with John Siracusa, Philip Michaels, Moisés Chiullan, and Dr. Drang — to talk about 2001: A Space Odyssey.

My fondness and appreciation for 2001 is hard to convey. Most of it holds up remarkably well 50 years later. There are parts that still seem impossible, 50 years later. But what ultimately strikes me about 2001 is that it was an attempt by arguably the greatest filmmaker who ever lived to make the greatest movie ever made. Ultimately the work itself is what matters in judging any artistic achievement, but the sheer ambition behind 2001 staggers me whenever I contemplate it. From the scientific rigor to the stunning advances in special effects to the gorgeous 70mm cinematography to the mesmerizing editing and soundtrack. 2001 simply swells my heart.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 hours ago by rufous
The 2018 Mac Mini – Marco.org
Marco Arment:

The 2018 Mac Mini is real, and it’s spectacular. It makes almost nothing worse and almost everything better, finally bringing the Mac Mini into the modern age.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
yesterday by rufous
iPad Pro 2018 review: A computer, not a PC - Six Colors
Jason Snell, writing last week at Six Colors:

With the iPad Pro and improvements to iOS and various iOS apps, I reached a point where I could do most or all of my required work on the road without bringing a Mac along. (I’ll get into some of the limitations below, because they still remain — and are frustrating reminders of how young this product still is.) I wasn’t going to leave the iPad behind, but I no longer needed to bring the Mac. My bag got lighter.

So when I review the new iPad Pro, it’s as someone who has chosen this platform as a tool to get work done around the house and on the road, in addition to all the other things the iPad excels at, like letting me read the news in the morning in bed while sipping my tea.

I simply love this review, and Snell’s perspective on the iPad in general, because Snell and I share a similar history, affinity, and expertise with the Mac. But he’s leaving me behind. I do travel with both an iPad and MacBook — but if I had to take only one it would be the MacBook, zero hesitation. I’m open to the notion that this is less about the iPad and more about me, personally.

But, I will object to one thing: the iPad feels like a young platform, yes, but it’s not young. It’s over 8 years old. Steve Jobs was still around to introduce it. When the Mac was 8 years old in 1992, System 7 had been launched and it was a very advanced platform, suitable for work of any kind. The new iPad Pro hardware might be the best consumer computer hardware ever made — the only rivals are the iPhone XS and XR. But software-wise, the iPad platform is nowhere near as far along after 8 years as the Mac was a generation ago. The iPhone is. But the iPad is not, and I don’t see how anyone can deny that.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
yesterday by rufous
Why the MacBook Air might spell the end of configurable Macs | Macworld
Jason Snell, writing at Macworld:

The new $1,199 base-model MacBook Air comes with a 1.6GHz dual-core Core i5 processor with Turbo Boost up to 3.6GHz. If you max out all of its specs, on the other hand, you’ll walk away with a $2,600 computer… with the very same 1.6GHz processor. Apple will let you expand storage (to 1.5TB) and memory (to 16GB), but the processor you get is the processor you get. […]

And it got me thinking: This feels like the future of the Mac, certainly on the consumer end of the product line. With the new MacBook Air, Apple has picked a processor and stuck with it. Would any of us be surprised if it did the same with a future update to the MacBook? Or low-end iMacs?

I am convinced this is the future of the Mac. The thing to keep in mind is that Apple’s A-series chips — like the A12 and A12X — aren’t just CPUs. They’re entire systems-on-a-chip. They are integrated wholes. It just doesn’t make sense to offer configurable CPU upgrades in an SoC context. Instead, you make a great SoC and offer configurable storage and RAM.

One reason the new MacBook Airs all share the same CPU is that it’s the only CPU from Intel right now that meets the MacBook Air’s power requirements. But count me in with Snell — I think configurable CPU options are going the way of removable batteries and optical drives.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
yesterday by rufous
Rogue Amoeba - Under the Microscope » Blog Archive » Apple’s Newest Macs Include Better Built-In Audio Devices
Paul Kafasis, writing at the Rogue Amoeba blog:

On older Macs, the headphone jack and the internal speakers are essentially separate ports on a single output device, and only one of these ports is allowed to be active at a time. Because of this, audio can be sent to either the built-in speakers, or the headphone jack, but not to both. As well, if anything is connected to the headphone jack, the OS shuts off the built-in speaker completely.

With these new Macs, there are actually two distinct output devices. The headphone jack and the internal speakers are separate devices, completely independent from one another.

Nice.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
yesterday by rufous
Are Pop Lyrics Getting More Repetitive?
Colin Morris, writing for The Pudding:

In 1977, the great computer scientist Donald Knuth published a paper called The Complexity of Songs, which is basically one long joke about the repetitive lyrics of newfangled music (example quote: “the advent of modern drugs has led to demands for still less memory, and the ultimate improvement of Theorem 1 has consequently just been announced”).

I’m going to try to test this hypothesis with data. I’ll be analyzing the repetitiveness of a dataset of 15,000 songs that charted on the Billboard Hot 100 between 1958 and 2017.

Clever technique.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
yesterday by rufous
Selling Cookies Demo App with Reader SDK for iOS
My thanks to Square for sponsoring this week at DF. You might know Square from their little white card readers, but for developers they have a suite of APIs and SDKs to help you take payments — both in-person and online. Square Reader SDK allows you to use Square hardware to take payments directly in your app. Check out their website to see their cookie-selling demo app, simulating what a Girl Scout would need to sell cookies.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
3 days ago by rufous
New AirPods are ‘definitely’ coming this year, according to one leaker – BGR
Chris Smith, BGR:

A few weeks ago, Apple insider Ming-Chi Kuo said that the AirPods 2 would launch either in late 2018 or early next year. Now we have a Samsung insider making a similar claim. “Ice Universe”, who’s a constant source of rumors, mostly related to Samsung mobile devices, said on Twitter that “Apple will definitely launch AirPods 2 this year”.

Anything is possible, but I’d find it a bit strange if Apple released new AirPods this year. If they were going to be ready for the holidays, why wouldn’t they have announced them at the event in Brooklyn two weeks ago? Why would they release a holiday gift guide listing the current AirPods as the second item on the list?

People are already buying holiday gifts, and gift-buying reaches its manic peak next week with Black Friday. People who are buying $160 AirPods now — on Apple’s own recommendation — would be justifiably angry if AirPods 2 come out before the holidays.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 days ago by rufous
Twitter
600+ likes and counting on this tweet that popped into my head this morning:

I wish you could delete apps right from the App Store Updates tab. When I see an update is pending for an app I never use, I just want to delete it right there.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 days ago by rufous
Twitter
It’s one thing to hear that there are a lot of magnets in the new iPad Pros. It’s another to see them.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
6 days ago by rufous
Trump Warns That Florida Recount Could Set Dangerous Precedent of Person with Most Votes Winning | The New Yorker
Satirist Andy Borowitz:

Calling for an “immediate end” to the recount in Florida, Donald J. Trump warned on Monday that it could set a dangerous precedent of the person with the most votes winning.

Speaking to reporters at the White House, Trump said that those in favor of the recount had a “sick obsession with finding out which candidate got the most votes.”

“Democrats are going on and on about counting every last vote until they find out who got the most,” Trump said. “Since when does getting the most votes mean you win?”

Under Trump, the line between satire and news is ever more blurred. The above is a more fair, more accurate description of Trump’s reaction to these close elections than anything in the supposedly straight news.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
6 days ago by rufous
Why aren't there Usb-c to Lightning Cables from Anker, Monoprice, Amazonbasics yet? : apple
Here’s a thread on Reddit asking why there aren’t any USB-C to Lightning cables from reliable, certified companies like Anker, Monoprice, and Amazon. It’s a year-old thread and the situation is unchanged. This stinks now that the entire MacBook line has gone to USB-C, along with chargers that output by USB-C.

I have this Anker 30-watt charger, for example. It’s a terrific product — nice size, great build quality, and just $26. (Apple’s 30-watt charger is $50.) Another great charger is Apple’s new 18-watt charger that’s included with the new iPad Pros (but which, oddly, is not yet available for purchase separately). These chargers all use USB-C for output. So if want to use them to charge a Lightning device — like, say, your iPhone — you need a USB-C to Lightning cable, and your only certified options are Apple’s 1-meter and 2-meter cables. Apple’s cables aren’t bad, but (a) they cost $19 and $35, respectively; and (b) the 1-meter cable is awfully long to be the shortest cable for this. I like having 6-inch cables for traveling, for plugging my phone into my MacBook to charge overnight.

What’s the deal here? Is there a technical issue? Or is Apple just spitefully keeping this market to itself? It really seems like a raw deal when you consider that Apple still doesn’t include a USB-C to Lightning cable with new iPhones.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
7 days ago by rufous
Stan Lee on the American Idea - The Atlantic
Great little graphic essay Stan Lee wrote for The Atlantic in 2007.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
7 days ago by rufous
Michael Chabon on Instagram: “Some people are influences. Others—a rare few—rearrange the very structure of your neurons. #StanLee’s creative and artistic contribution…”
Michael Chabon, on Instagram:

Some people are influences. Others — a rare few — rearrange the very structure of your neurons. Stan Lee’s creative and artistic contribution to the Marvel pantheon has been debated endlessly, but one has only to look at Jack Kirby’s solo work to see what Stan brought to the partnership: an unshakable humanism, a faith in our human capacity for altruism and self-sacrifice and in the eventual triumph of the rational over the irrational, of love over hate, that was a perfect counterbalance to Kirby’s dark, hard-earned quasi-nihilism. In the heyday of their partnership, it was Stan’s vision that predominated and that continues to shape my way of seeing the world, and of telling stories about that world, to this day.

Beautifully said. There’s something apt about using a primarily visual medium like Instagram as an outlet for great writing to remember a man whose life’s work was writing for comic books.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
7 days ago by rufous
www.washingtonpost.com
Alexander F. Remington and Michael Cavna, writing for The Washington Post:

Traditionally, comics were drawn from a screenplay-like script provided by the writer. Instead, Mr. Lee said, he would offer his artists plot ideas and brainstorm with them. The artists would then draw the story, and he would later fill in dialogue and text.

Artists in his “bullpen,” where the artists worked in proximity to each other and to him, were much more involved in the creative process. This became known as the Marvel Method.

The man made a lot of cameos.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
8 days ago by rufous
Bitly
You might know us for our little white reader, but did you know that Square Developer has a suite of APIs and SDKs to help you take payments in-person and online? Square Reader SDK allows you to use Square hardware to take payments directly in your app. Learn how we built an iOS cookie demo app, perfect for the Girl Scout in your life.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
8 days ago by rufous
Dorsey says Twitter is thinking about an edit button to fix typos in tweets
It’s perfectly reasonable for something as advanced as an “Edit” button to take a multi-billion dollar company years to consider.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
8 days ago by rufous
The Talk Show ✪: Ep. 234, With Special Guest Merlin Mann
Special guest Merlin Mann returns to the show. Topics include the new iPad Pro and the state of iOS as a work platform, the mid-term election results, and holiday parties of yore.

Brought to you by these fine sponsors:

Away: Travel smarter with the suitcase that charges your phone. Save $20 with promo code talkshow.

Squarespace: Make your next move. Use promo code talkshow for 10% off your first order.

Jamf Now: Set up and protect your Apple devices at work, from anywhere. First 3 devices are free.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
10 days ago by rufous
Red Sox advance to the ALCS, after one of the greatest ninth innings ever - SBNation.com
Month-old news at this point, but I only just now got around to reading Grant Brisbee’s spot-on summary of game 4 of the ALDS, the best single game, by far, of the entire postseason:

But this is it. This is the baseball experience. You build up the energy over 162 games, and you store it and hope for the best, and the radiation becomes too much, and now the parakeet is dead. Great. Except that’s exactly what you want. You want the release after 162 games, the progressive jackpot paying off.

Baseball is a ponzi scheme, except it really does pay off occasionally, and when it does, you get everything that you promised.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
11 days ago by rufous
Apple WWDC 2005-The Intel Switch Revealed - YouTube
The bit about performance-per-watt (around the 2:50 mark) seems like an argument Apple will be making again, this year or next, when they announce Macs running with Apple’s in-house ARM chips. Really, the argument is going to be exactly the same: Apple has ideas for future Macs that they can’t build using Intel chips. (Via Peter Zopf.)

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
14 days ago by rufous
What We Can All Do at This Moment Is Vote | The New Yorker
Inspiring piece by 98-year-old Roger Angell in The New Yorker:

What we can all do at this moment is vote — get up, brush our teeth, go to the polling place, and get in line. I was never in combat as a soldier, but now I am. Those of you who haven’t quite been getting to your polling place lately, who want better candidates or a clearer system of making yourself heard, or who just aren’t in the habit, need to get it done this time around. If you stay home, count yourself among the hundreds of thousands now being disenfranchised by the relentless parade of restrictions that Republicans everywhere are imposing and enforcing. If you don’t vote, they have won, and you are a captive, one of their prizes.

Via Kottke, who aptly describes Angell as a national treasure.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
14 days ago by rufous
‎Universe — Website Builder on the App Store
My thanks to Universe for sponsoring Daring Fireball this week. Universe is the first website builder designed from the ground up for iOS. Building a website should be fun and creative, so Universe doesn’t have templates. Themes, yes. Templates, no. Instead, Universe uses an open-ended grid and a constantly expanding array of “blocks” for content types, which makes building a site as fun as playing with Legos. Design a store (they’ve partnered with Shopify), create a portfolio, or start a magazine right from your iPhone.

Just this week, they released a major 2.0 update, including full support for iPads — just in time for the new iPad Pros. (Universe already supports the new iPad Pro screen sizes and round corners perfectly.)

I really just love the idea of owning and creating your own website. Universe offers a really original take on how to actually do this, and the fact that it started as an iPhone app means the iPhone is a first-class device for using it. I really think it’s one of the most interesting creative apps for iPhone and iPad that I’ve seen. Trust me, download Universe and just poke around for a while — it’s deeper than you think. Try it out free of charge on the App Store.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
14 days ago by rufous
Google employees and contractors participate in “global walkout for real change”
Google Walkout:

More than 20,000 Google employees and contractors in Google offices located in 50 cities worldwide walked out for real change at 11:10am local time protesting sexual harassment, misconduct, lack of transparency, and a workplace culture that doesn’t work for everyone. Nine offices have yet to report numbers, and additional offices in Europe have planned walkouts in the coming days. […]

Protest organizers say they were disgusted by the details of the recent article from The New York Times which provided the latest example of a culture of complicity, dismissiveness, and support for perpetrators in the face of sexual harassment, misconduct, and abuse of power. They framed the problem as part of a longstanding pattern in a toxic work culture further amplified by systemic racism.

Awful lot of “Don’t Be Evil” signs in the crowd shots.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
16 days ago by rufous
Apple Abandons the Mass Market, as the iPhone Turns Luxury | WIRED
Zachary Karabell, in an article for Wired under the headline “Apple Abandons the Mass Market, as the iPhone Turns Luxury”:

As its market cap hovers near $1 trillion, Apple has gradually been shifting its strategy away from grabbing ever-more market share and focusing instead on dominating the higher end of its markets. If there were even a small doubt about that, the recent results made it screamingly clear.

When has Apple ever had a different strategy than focusing on dominating the higher end of its markets and ignoring sheer market share? The iPod — maybe — was a market share leader, depending on how you defined its category. But even with iPods Apple clearly was determined to dominate the higher end of the market.

It’s also worth noting that Apple stores are chock full of people from all walks of life. [As I noted 7 years ago, Apple’s brand of luxury is mass-market luxury][a]:

I think it’s impossible to overstate the importance of Apple’s retail business. The growth in stores — both in the number of outlets and the size and architectural prominence of the flagship locations — is a physical manifestation of Apple’s market share growth in device sales. Luxury retailers have long done this. Think about brands like Tiffany, Gucci, Hermès, Louis Vuitton. Their retail stores are physical manifestations of the brands. But Apple’s brand of luxury is mass market luxury. Apple’s stores are crowded. They’re bustling. They’re loud. And they’re inclusive, not exclusive.

It’s been a long 7 years since I wrote that, but every word remains just as true today.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
16 days ago by rufous
Apple’s New Map
Justin O’Beirne has a detailed look at what’s new in Apple’s limited rollout (big parts of California, a few counties in western Nevada) of all-new maps in iOS 12:

Unless they’re already listed on Yelp, none of the shapes Apple has added appear in its search results or are labeled on its map. And this is a problem for Apple because AR is all about labels — but Apple’s new map is all about shapes.

So is Apple making the right map?

O’Bierne’s keen observation is this: even in the areas where Apple’s new maps have rolled out, Google is still far ahead in correctly identifying places and specific destinations. And that might be the most important thing for maps to get right going forward. As usual, his piece is exquisitely well-written, designed, and illustrated.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
17 days ago by rufous
mobile.twitter.com
Dan Frakes:

Some job news (thread): After 4(!) amazing years at @wirecutter, I’m leaving for a new editorial position at Apple (Mac App Store Editor!) focused on helping Mac users discover and get more out of great Mac apps. (It’s like Mac Gems redux :) )

Apple is a great place to work, and the App Store teams are producing (and commissioning) excellent work. This is good for Apple, good for App Store users, good for developers whose quality apps are getting editorial attention, and good for these talented writers and editors, job-wise.

But.

A ton of the top talent in the Apple media world now works at Apple, un-bylined and without credit. Most of them came from Macworld. In addition to the folks who’ve gone to work at Apple full-time, there are others who are writing as freelancers for App Store features. I don’t blame Apple for hiring great talent and I don’t blame anyone for taking a well-paying secure job at Apple (or accepting well-paying freelance work). But I don’t think this is a good thing for the Apple media world. The talent pool writing about Apple products and platforms from outside the company’s walls is getting noticeably shallower. And on a personal level, this trend is not good for me, because I can’t link to App Store articles, because they’re not on the web. They only exist within the App Store apps. I can’t link to some of the best pieces being written these days about indie iOS and Macs apps — and that’s a little weird. And none of these pieces are archived publicly.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
17 days ago by rufous
Twitter
Boger is senior director of Mac product marketing at Apple, and was on stage this week to introduce the new Mac Mini. Terrific interview.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
18 days ago by rufous
Recode and Vox.com announce new partnership - Recode
Kara Swisher:

Let me be clear, for those who enjoy heedless media speculation: The Recode brand remains the same; the Code conferences remain the same; the podcasts remain the same; the television specials we do with MSNBC remain the same. And I am not going anywhere either, because Recode has allowed me — whatever the medium — the great gift of being able to do what journalists are supposed to do. Which is to say, to use an old journalism bromide: Afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted.

More here from The Wall Street Journal. In staffing news, my friend Dan Frommer is leaving after three years as Recode’s editor-in-chief.

Bonus: A get-the-popcorn back-and-forth between Swisher and The Information founder Jessica Lessin on Twitter.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
19 days ago by rufous
The Talk Show ✪: Ep. 233, With Special Guest John Moltz
You wanted more Moltz, you get more Moltz. Our thoughts and observations on Apple’s “There’s More in the Making” event at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and the products they announced: new MacBook Airs, Mac Minis, iPad Pros, and Apple Pencil.

Brought to you by:

The Apple Watch Triathlete: Pre-order the How to Train like an IronMan with Apple Watch e-book before December 3 and save 60 percent with promo code thetalkshow.

Fracture: Your photos printed in vivid color directly on glass.

Linode: Instantly deploy and manage an SSD server in the Linode Cloud. Get $20 in credit with promo code talkshow2018.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
19 days ago by rufous
Watch EVERYONE pick the iPhone XR over a 1080p Screen - YouTube
Jonathan Morrison set up a blind display comparison between the iPhone XR and Xiaomi Pocophone. Both displays are 6.1 inches, both are LCDs, but the Pocophone is 1080p (1080 × 2246 pixels, 403 PPI) and the XR is not (1792 × 828, 326 PPI).

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
19 days ago by rufous
iPhone XR vs. XS Display: OLED Worth an Extra $250? - YouTube
Good explanation from Rene Ritchie on the many nuances involved comparing the iPhone XS and XR displays. It’s a lot more complicated than “OLED is better”, and it’s just plain nonsense that the 326 pixels per inch is not enough to make for a great display.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
20 days ago by rufous
Fleetsmith: Secure, cloud-based Mac management via G Suite or Office 365
My thanks to Fleetsmith for sponsoring this week on Daring Fireball. Fleetsmith automates Apple device management, making IT teams more efficient and putting zero-touch device setup, fleet-wide visibility, automatic updates, and security best practices within reach for everyone.

Fleetsmith offers two complementary solutions:

Fleetsmith Intelligence provides free real-time visibility into your entire device fleet, proactively exposing business and security risks before it’s too late.

Fleetsmith Managed fully automates device setup, app and OS updates, and security. You can upgrade your devices to Fleetsmith Managed with a single click.

Fleetsmith Intelligence is free forever, and Fleetsmith Managed is free to try for up to 10 devices, with no restrictions, no time limitations, and no credit card required.

Run your devices; don’t let them run you. Sign up for Fleetsmith today.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
21 days ago by rufous
Fifty Years of BASIC, the Language That Made Computers Personal | Time
Harry McCracken, in a nice feature for Time:

It was huge news among the small number of people who could be called computer nerds at the time — people like Paul Allen, who was working as a programmer for Honeywell in Boston.

When he bought a copy of the January 1975 issue of Popular Electronics at the Out of Town newsstand in Harvard Square, with the Altair on the cover, he and an old friend — a Harvard sophomore named Bill Gates — got excited. Immediately, they knew they wanted to try to make the Altair run BASIC, a language they’d both learned in its original timeshared-via-Teletype form at the Lakeside School in Seattle.

Actually, Allen had been ruminating about the possibility of building his own BASIC even before he knew about the Altair. “There hadn’t been attempts to write a full-blown programming language for a microprocessor,” he explains. “But when the chips leading up to the 8080 processor became available, I realized we could write a program for it that would be powerful enough to run BASIC.”

For those of us of a certain age, a BASIC prompt was what you’d expect to see when you turned any computer on.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
22 days ago by rufous
302 Found
Ben Sandofsky:

Now we get to do that again: Halide 1.11 will let you take Portrait mode photos of just about anything, not just people.

We do this by grabbing the focus pixel disparity map and running the image through our custom blur. When you open Halide on iPhone XR, simply tap ‘Depth’ to enable depth capture. Any photo you take will have a depth map, and if there’s sufficient data to determine a foreground and background, the image will get beautifully rendered bokeh, just like iPhone XS shots.

You’ll notice that enabling the Depth Capture mode does not allow you to preview Portrait blur effect or even automatically detect people. Unfortunately, the iPhone XR does not stream depth data in realtime, so we can’t do a portrait preview. You’ll have to review your portrait effects after having taken the photo, much like the Google Pixel.

I’m so glad Halide offers this, but I can see why Apple hasn’t enabled it for non-human subjects in the built-in Camera app. It’s hit or miss. But when it hits it can look great. What you want to do is let Halide handle the focus blurring; if you don’t like the result, disable “Depth” for that shot in Halide.

With frequent updates and support for the latest iPhone hardware, Halide has established itself as an essential app for serious iPhone photography. Doesn’t hurt that it’s a beautiful app, either.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
22 days ago by rufous
BMW executive says electric cars will always cost more than conventional cars
Filed away for future claim chowder:

Electric vehicles will always be more costly than fuel-burners, according to a senior BMW executive. “No, no, no,” is Klaus Frölich’s reply when asked if EVs will ever equal the prices of equivalent conventional cars. “Never.”

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
22 days ago by rufous
The Talk Show ✪: Ep. 232, With Special Guest John Moltz
Special guest John Moltz returns to the show (finally). Topics include the iPhone XR, next week’s Apple event at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and more.

Brought to you by these fine sponsors:

Squarespace: Make your next move. Use code talkshow for 10% off your first order.

RXBAR: Real food that tastes good and is good for you.

Prime Video Channels: Create a TV lineup you love from 100+ premium and specialty channels.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
23 days ago by rufous
‎Audio Memos Pro on the App Store
My thanks to Audio Memos Pro for sponsoring Daring Fireball last week. Audio Memos Pro is the pro voice recorder for iPhone and iPad (and Apple Watch can be used as a remote control). Interviews, lectures, business meetings, even music sessions — Audio Memos is great for recording anything. And it’s not just about recording — Audio Memos Pro lets you keep a library of recordings organized with tags. You can attach photos to recordings, make annotations at time stamps, and more.

Audio Memos just celebrated its 10th anniversary on the App Store. Join the million of users who have recorded with it. Get it before Monday evening and save 10 percent off the regular price.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
25 days ago by rufous
Twitter
Andy Rubin on Twitter:

The New York Times story contains numerous inaccuracies about my employment at Google and wild exaggerations about my compensation. Specifically, I never coerced a woman to have sex in a hotel room. These false allegations are part of a smear campaign to disparage me during a divorce and custody battle. Also, I am deeply troubled that anonymous Google executives are commenting about my personnel file and misrepresenting the facts.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
25 days ago by rufous
Worried about Trump iPhone eavesdroppers? China recommends a Huawei | Reuters
Reuters:

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying also dismissed the Times story, calling such reports “evidence that the New York Times makes fake news.”

Speaking at a news conference on Thursday, she also offered two suggestions apparently aimed at the Trump administration.

“If they are really very worried about Apple phones being bugged, then they can change to using Huawei,” she said, referring to China’s biggest telecommunications equipment maker.

A nice burn, but if Russia and China really are listening to Trump’s unsecure cell phone calls, they’re almost certainly doing it by tapping the cellular signal or phone network, not by hacking the iPhones he uses. I don’t think the Times story made this clear, but it should have.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
25 days ago by rufous
Google’s Night Sight for Pixel phones will amaze you - The Verge
Vlad Savov:

Night Sight is the next evolution of Google’s computational photography, combining machine learning, clever algorithms, and up to four seconds of exposure to generate shockingly good low-light images. I’ve tried it ahead of its upcoming release, courtesy of a camera app tweak released by XDA Developers user cstark27, and the results are nothing short of amazing. Even in its pre-official state before Google is officially happy enough to ship it, this new night mode makes any Pixel phone that uses it the best low-light camera.

Some of these results seem impossible. Handheld long exposures are a huge breakthrough.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
25 days ago by rufous
How “Silicon Valley” Nails Silicon Valley | The New Yorker
Andrew Marantz, writing for The New Yorker two years ago about how HBO’s Silicon Valley:

During one visit to Google’s headquarters, in Mountain View, about six writers sat in a conference room with Astro Teller, the head of GoogleX, who wore a midi ring and kept his long hair in a ponytail. “Most of our research meetings are fun, but this one was uncomfortable,” Kemper told me. GoogleX is the company’s “moonshot factory,” devoted to projects, such as self-driving cars, that are difficult to build but might have monumental impact. Hooli, a multibillion-dollar company on “Silicon Valley,” bears a singular resemblance to Google. (The Google founder Larry Page, in Fortune: “We’d like to have a bigger impact on the world by doing more things.” Hooli’s C.E.O., in season two: “I don’t want to live in a world where someone makes the world a better place better than we do.”) The previous season, Hooli had launched HooliXYZ, its own “moonshot factory,” whose experiments were slapstick absurdities: monkeys who use bionic arms to masturbate; powerful cannons for launching potatoes across a room. “He claimed he hadn’t seen the show, and then he referred many times to specific things that had happened on the show,” Kemper said. “His message was, ‘We don’t do stupid things here. We do things that actually are going to change the world, whether you choose to make fun of that or not.’ ” (Teller could not be reached for comment.)

Teller ended the meeting by standing up in a huff, but his attempt at a dramatic exit was marred by the fact that he was wearing Rollerblades. He wobbled to the door in silence. “Then there was this awkward moment of him fumbling with his I.D. badge, trying to get the door to open,” Kemper said. “It felt like it lasted an hour. We were all trying not to laugh. Even while it was happening, I knew we were all thinking the same thing: Can we use this?” In the end, the joke was deemed “too hacky to use on the show.”

Via Tim Gara, who quipped, “Whenever there’s a big Google story in the news, I always think of this, the funniest thing ever written about Google.”

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
25 days ago by rufous
ActBlue
The Great Slate:

Tech Solidarity is endorsing thirteen candidates for Congress. Each of them is a first-time progressive candidate with no ties to the political establishment, an excellent campaign team, and a clear path to victory in a poor, rural district that is being ignored by the national Democratic Party. None of the candidates takes money from corporations.

In the third quarter of 2018, the Great Slate raised $1.18M for our candidates. Let’s keep the momentum going into the election!

These are great candidates for Congress. No corporate money. Progressive agendas. Ignored (mostly) by the national Democratic Party. And fighting for seats in districts that in years past sometimes didn’t even field a Democratic candidate. Republicans simply ran unopposed.

I’m particularly impressed by Jess King, who is running for the district in nearby Lancaster, PA. I have close family who live in that district. I don’t just like her as a candidate — I really do think she can win. She’s out there every day talking to the citizens in her district. She’s held 52 town halls and counting during this election. Her opponent, Rep. Lloyd Smucker (that’s his name, I swear) has not held a single town hall in over 600 days.

Lancaster Online:

King, a former economic development nonprofit director, has raised nearly 100 percent of her funds from individuals while refusing to accept money from corporations’ political action committees.

The majority of Smucker’s funds, meanwhile, have come from PACs representing corporations such as General Electric, Exelon, Koch Industries and Williams, the company that recently built the Atlantic Sunrise pipeline going through Lancaster County.

I’ve donated to The Great Slate before, and today my wife and I donated another $1,000. It’s easy — they even support Apple Pay. By default your contribution is distributed between all 13 candidates, but you can distribute it however you choose if there’s a particular candidate you want to get behind. They’ve got a goal to raise $1,000,000, and they’re currently sitting at $952,154.

I would love to see this link from Daring Fireball push them over their goal. If you can give a lot, do it. If you can only give $10, do it! Every single dollar helps — I mean this so sincerely I just used an exclamation mark. If you’re feeling like me — anxious about this upcoming election, concerned because the stakes are so high — donating to The Great Slate is one of the most effective ways you can make a difference today.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
26 days ago by rufous
The Stakes are Dire – Talking Points Memo
Josh Marshall, writing at TPM:

As a friend pointed out yesterday, 2016 can be seen as a fluke. A series of perfect storm factors coming together to make Donald Trump President with a minority of the popular vote and razor thin margins in three critical states. 2018, if it’s a winning election for the Republicans, will be a choice. A ratification of everything we’ve seen over the last two years. That will be a reality we’ll all have to contend with for what it says about the state of the country. It will send a signal abroad that this is now the American political reality and unquestionably accelerate all the geo-political processes Trump has spurred or which drove him to the White House in the first place.

A lot of people are calling this election the most important of our lifetimes. That can sound like hyperbole, I know. You can find some people saying the same thing about every election. But I think Marshall puts his finger on it above. 2016 was certain a momentous election, but there was no consensus on what a Trump presidency would mean. A lot of people voted for Trump arguing that while he said crazy, ignorant, hateful things, he wouldn’t actually do crazy, ignornant, ignorant, hateful things when in office. Now we know, we all know.

If the Republicans hold Congress it will ratify that this is who we are.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
26 days ago by rufous
App Scams: Sneaky 'Utility' Apps Are Stealing $260, $2500, or even $4700 Each Year ... Per User
Apple’s App Store isn’t free from scams, either. John Koetsier, writing for Forbes:

I tried it myself, and the flow is very clear:

Download the app

Open it

Click the big “Start” button (this has small, hard-to-read pricing information, but even though I was testing the app and forewarned, I missed it)

Instantly be taken to an Apple payments confirmation screen: free for three days, and then $3.99/week in perpetuity.

The flow is smart and sneaky. It’s carefully designed to have you “agree” to the charges without having any intention of paying

“Users open the app and quickly tap a ‘Start’ button or ‘Continue’ button on the first page,” she told me via email. “Unfortunately this loads the Apple payment prompt instead of starting the free app as most users would expect. Users then panic and press the home screen to exit the app — unfortunately on fingerprint devices this makes payment or signs up for the free trial.”

Needless to say, $4/week for a very, very, very simple barcode-scanning device is completely ridiculous. $156/year borders on criminal.

Apple has since pulled most of these apps from the App Store, but how did they get there in the first place? I can see how a new app with a malicious IAP scam might slip through review, but once an app is generating tens of thousands of dollars a month, it ought to get a thorough review from the App Store.

The scam outlined above is admittedly pretty clever. I’d never really thought about it before, but the fact that the home button on Touch ID devices serves both as the “Yes I really do want to authorize this payment” verification and the “Get me out of this app and back to the home screen” escape hatch makes it ripe for abuse like this. Face ID doesn’t make X-class iPhones immune from scams, but the requirement that you double-click the side button to verify a payment means you can’t be tricked into doing it inadvertently.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
27 days ago by rufous
Apps Installed On Millions Of Android Phones Tracked User Behavior To Execute A Multimillion-Dollar Ad Fraud Scheme
Craig Silverman, reporting for BuzzFeed News:

One way the fraudsters find apps for their scheme is to acquire legitimate apps through We Purchase Apps and transfer them to shell companies. They then capture the behavior of the app’s human users and program a vast network of bots to mimic it, according to analysis from Protected Media, a cybersecurity and fraud detection firm that analyzed the apps and websites at BuzzFeed News’ request.

This means a significant portion of the millions of Android phone owners who downloaded these apps were secretly tracked as they scrolled and clicked inside the application. By copying actual user behavior in the apps, the fraudsters were able to generate fake traffic that bypassed major fraud detection systems. […]

In total, the apps identified by BuzzFeed News have been installed on Android phones more than 115 million times, according to data from analytics service AppBrain. Most are games, but others include a flashlight app, a selfie app, and a healthy eating app. One app connected to the scheme, EverythingMe, has been installed more than 20 million times.

These criminals raked in tens of millions of dollars, maybe hundreds of millions, including millions from Google’s own ad network.

The bottom line: if the metric used for charging for advertising can be faked, it will be faked. Ad tracking is both an invasion of privacy and an open invitation to fraud.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
27 days ago by rufous
DRM for chargers? Google Pixel 3 locks fast Qi charging to certified chargers [Update] | Ars Technica
Ron Amadeo, writing at Ars Technica:

For some unexplained reason, Google is locking out third-party Qi chargers from reaching the highest charging speeds on the Pixel 3. Third-party chargers are capped to a pokey 5W charging speed. If you want 10 watts of wireless charging, Google hopes you will invest in its outrageously priced Pixel Stand, which is $79. […]

Regular 10W wireless chargers can be had for around $15-$25, so Google’s $79 Pixel Stand comes at a hefty markup. Qi is a standard, and a phone should strive to work with every charger. The Qi standard goes up to 15W, so there doesn’t seem to be any reason for Google’s 5W limit.

Amadeo’s take captures the consensus reaction to this news — that it’s a money grab on Google’s part, trying to get Pixel 3 owners to buy Google’s own proprietary charging stand. Maybe that’s true. But it may not be true. This idea that Google should have supported the Qi standard for higher charging speeds is based on the assumption that the Qi standard is technically good. I don’t think that’s a safe assumption at all.

A money grab for $79 charging stands doesn’t sound like Google at all to me. I think it’s more likely that Google went with a proprietary technology for higher charging speeds because their proprietary technology works better than whatever the Qi standard specifies for 10W charging. Keep in mind too that they’ve surely been working on the Pixel 3 hardware for years.

I could be wrong. But it seems far more likely to me, and more in character with Google, that they’re not sticking with the Qi standard simply because the standard isn’t good enough — or wasn’t good enough two years ago when they were making engineering decisions for the Pixel 3. Here’s the thing about industry standards like Qi: they usually suck.

Qi not being good enough is exactly why Apple’s mythical AirPower charging pad was touted as supporting a basic level of the Qi standard, but adding a lot of proprietary features on top.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
27 days ago by rufous
What the Hell Happened to Darius Miles? | By Darius Miles
Darius Miles on going straight from high school to the L.A. Clippers in 2000. Remarkably compelling read, capturing both the joy and the tragedy of his life. Trust me, even if you’re not into sports, you want to read this.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
27 days ago by rufous
With the iPhone XR, Apple broadens its 'best'
Engadget’s Chris Velazco got to sit down with Phil Schiller to talk about the iPhone XR:

To add to the curiosity of it all, the R doesn’t mean much either. Phil Schiller, gingerly gripping a cup of coffee across from me, said the letters Apple uses never stand for something specific. But then his voice softened a little as he started to tell me about what the letters mean to him.

“I love cars and things that go fast, and R and S are both letters used to denote sport cars that are really extra special,” he said with a smile.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
28 days ago by rufous
Your move, Bloomberg - The Washington Post
Washington Post media critic Erik Wemple:

Sources tell the Erik Wemple Blog that the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and The Post have each sunk resources into confirming the story, only to come up empty-handed. […]

The best journalism lends itself to reverse engineering. Though no news organization may ever match the recent New York Times investigation of Trump family finances, for instance, the newspaper published documents, cited sources and described entities with a public footprint. “Fear,” the recent book on the dysfunction of the Trump White House, starts with the story of a top official removing a trade document from the president’s desk, an account supported by an image of the purloined paper.

Bloomberg, on the other hand, gives readers virtually no road map for reproducing its scoop, which helps to explain why competitors have whiffed in their efforts to corroborate it. The relentlessness of the denials and doubts from companies and government officials obligate Bloomberg to add the sort of proof that will make believers of its skeptics. Assign more reporters to the story, re-interview sources, ask for photos and emails. Should it fail in this effort, it’ll need to retract the entire thing.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
29 days ago by rufous
How China rips off the iPhone and reinvents Android - The Verge
I just loved this deep dive into Chinese phone makers’ custom Android-based OSes by Sam Byford:

Many experienced Android users in the West who try out Chinese phones, including reviewers here at The Verge, often find themselves unable to get over an immediate stumbling block: the software. For the unfamiliar, Chinese phone software can be garish, heavy-handed, and quite unlike anything installed on phones that are popular outside of Asia. If there’s anything that’s going to turn you off the brand-new Huawei Mate 20 Pro, for example — unsubstantiated Cold War-esque paranoia aside — it’s likely to be the software.

But for the last year-plus, I’ve used almost every major Chinese phone extensively, traveled to the country several times, and met with dozens of people at its biggest phone manufacturers. This experience hasn’t altogether stopped me from feeling that most Chinese phone companies have a long way to go in many areas of software development. No one has a great answer for why everyone copies the iPhone camera app so embarrassingly. But I have learned a lot about the design principles behind many of these phones, and — as you ought to expect — there does tend to be a method behind what some may assume to be madness.

Byford makes a compelling case that these Android derivitives — Xiaomi’s MIUI, Vivo’s Funtouch OS (real name, I swear), Oppo’s ColorOS, and Huawei’s EMUI, just to name some of them — are best thought of as Android-based OSes, not mere “skins” atop Google’s canonical Android. There really is no canonical Android anymore, really, because the OS Google ships on its Pixels isn’t available to other handset makers.

And these Chinese companies all rip off iOS with absolutely no shame:

As for the camera apps, it’s really incredible how similar the vast majority are — both to each other and to Apple. Judging by the accuracy and specificity of the rip-offs, the camera app from iOS 7 has a serious claim to being one of the most influential software designs of the past decade. Just look at the picture above. Xiaomi wins an extremely low number of points for putting the modes in a lowercase blue font. But otherwise, only Huawei has succeeded in creating a genuinely new camera app design, which happens to be very good. I consider it penance for the company’s egregious and barely functional rip-off of the iOS share sheet.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
29 days ago by rufous
Former Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe Departs Facebook
Jamie Feltham,

Oculus co-founder Brendan Iribe, the company’s first and only CEO, is parting ways with parent company Facebook.

In a post on Facebook Iribe noted he would be taking his “first real break” in over 20 years, though didn’t provide a reason for his departure.

I wonder how long John Carmack will last?

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
29 days ago by rufous
Twitter
Amazon Web Services CEO Andy Jassy on Twitter:

@tim_cook is right. Bloomberg story is wrong about Amazon, too. They offered no proof, story kept changing, and showed no interest in our answers unless we could validate their theories. Reporters got played or took liberties. Bloomberg should retract.

If you want a taste of Bloomberg’s attitude toward Apple’s and Amazon’s protestations, check out this video from Bloomberg TV from the day after the story was originally published. Jordan Robertson, co-author of the story, says this:

In addition, there is no consumer data that is alleged to have been stolen. This attack was about long term access to sensitive networks. So by that logic, companies are not required to disclose this information, so there’s no advantage for these companies in confirming this reporting.

This shows their dismissive attitude toward Amazon’s and Apple’s strenuous, unambiguous denials. Rather than give them pause, they blew it off.

I would argue that Amazon and Apple have a tremendous amount to lose — their credibility. If they wanted to hide something, whether for publicity or national security reasons (or both), the way to do it without risking their credibility is not to comment at all. Both Amazon and Apple have instead vigorously denied the veracity of this story.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
29 days ago by rufous
‘Transgender’ Could Be Defined Out of Existence Under Trump Administration - The New York Times
Erica L. Green, Katie Benner, and Robert Pear:

The Trump administration is considering narrowly defining gender as a biological, immutable condition determined by genitalia at birth, the most drastic move yet in a governmentwide effort to roll back recognition and protections of transgender people under federal civil rights law.

Needlessly cruel, and out of touch with demographic trends. This might play with Trump’s base today, but with these retrograde policies, the Republican Party is digging itself into a deep hole they’ll likely never climb out of as younger generations take over the U.S. electorate. Among kids today, support for transgender people — not just legally but socially — is a bedrock. Outright hateful policies will neither be forgotten nor forgiven.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
29 days ago by rufous
“How to Vote” - YouTube
Demi Adejuyigbe with a short lesson on how to democracy.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 weeks ago by rufous
Flow - A new class of motion design for mobile.
My thanks to Flow for sponsoring Daring Fireball last week. Flow is a professional UI animation tool that lets you design in Sketch and export your animations to production-ready code (iOS or HTML).

Flow offers a new class of motion design for anyone with a creative flair and a taste for building beautiful products and writing great software. Don’t just hand your developers static screenshots — send them animations and working code. It’s a powerful tool for crafting your vision and exporting high-quality layout and animation code.

They have a bunch of tutorials to get you started, and a fun introductory video on their homepage. Give Flow a shot with a 30-day free trial.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 weeks ago by rufous
Subscribe to read | Financial Times
Nice little interview with Ive by Nicholas Foulkes for The Financial Times:

“I think we have been lulled into this sense that people will accept new products and services very quickly, and I don’t believe that’s true at all,” he says. “Very often, so much of what a product ends up being able to do isn’t what you initially thought. If you’re creating something new, it is inevitable there will be consequences that were not foreseen — some that will be great, and then there are those that aren’t as positive. There is a responsibility to try and predict as many of the consequences as possible and I think you have a moral responsibility to try to understand, try to mitigate those that you didn’t predict.”

“If you genuinely have a concern for humanity, you will be preoccupied with trying to understand the implications, the consequences of creating something that hasn’t existed before. I think it’s part of the culture at Apple to believe that there is a responsibility that doesn’t end when you ship a product.” As he speaks, his face rearranges itself into a troubled frown. “It keeps me awake.”

If you can’t get past the FT’s paywall, going through a Google search might help.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 weeks ago by rufous
Apple CEO Tim Cook Is Calling For Bloomberg To Retract Its Chinese Spy Chip Story
John Paczkowski and Joseph Bernstein, reporting for BuzzFeed News:

“There is no truth in their story about Apple,” Cook told BuzzFeed News in a phone interview.

This is an extraordinary statement from Cook and Apple. The company has never previously publicly (though it may have done so privately) called for the retraction of a news story — even in cases where the stories have had major errors, or were demonstratively false, such as a This American Life episode that was shown to be fabricated.

Reached for comment, Bloomberg reiterated its previous defense of the story. “Bloomberg Businessweek’s investigation is the result of more than a year of reporting, during which we conducted more than 100 interviews,” a spokesperson told BuzzFeed News in response to a series of questions. “Seventeen individual sources, including government officials and insiders at the companies, confirmed the manipulation of hardware and other elements of the attacks. We also published three companies’ full statements, as well as a statement from China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. We stand by our story and are confident in our reporting and sources.”

I’m calling it now. Bloomberg is fucked on this story. The longer they drag this out before a full retraction, the more damage they’re taking to their long-term credibility. Read their statement closely — they’re not saying their story is true or that Apple and Tim Cook are wrong. All they say is they spent a year on the story and spoke to 100 sources.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 weeks ago by rufous
Landscapes of Ladakh, India – Photos by Om
Gorgeous photos from Om Malik, all shot on an iPhone XS Max.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 weeks ago by rufous
Watch Apple’s next special event
Presumably to announce all-new iPad Pro models, and, I hope, new MacBooks. (I don’t want to jinx anything by even mentioning new Mac Minis outside a parenthetical.) The event is being held on the east coast, at the 2,100-seat Howard Gilman Opera House in Brooklyn.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 weeks ago by rufous
Facebook inflated ad metrics up to 900 percent: lawsuit
Ethan Baron:

Not only did Facebook inflate ad-watching metrics by up to 900 percent, it knew for more than a year that its average-viewership estimates were wrong and kept quiet about it, a new legal filing claims.

A group of small advertisers suing the Menlo Park social media titan alleged in the filing that Facebook “induced” advertisers to buy video ads on its platform because advertisers believed Facebook users were watching video ads for longer than they actually were.

That “unethical, unscrupulous” behavior by Facebook constituted fraud because it was “likely to deceive” advertisers, the filing alleged.

If true, Facebook’s big “pivot” to video was really a scam. Again, Facebook is looking more and more like a criminal enterprise. A Silicon Valley racket.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 weeks ago by rufous
The Talk Show ✪: Ep. It’s a Deep Notch, With Special Guest Dan Frommer
Dan Frommer returns to the show. Topics include Apple Watch Series 4 and the notion of third-party watch faces, Google’s Pixel 3 phones and Pixel Slate two-in-one tablet/notebook, and Bloomberg’s disputed “The Big Hack” story.

Brought to you by these fine sponsors:

Casper: Save $50 on select mattresses with code talkshow.

Squarespace: Make your next move. Check out with code talkshow for 10% off your first order.

Tres Pontas: Freshly-roasted coffee from a single farm in Brazil, shipped directly to you. Use code thetalkshow at checkout and save an extra 10% on any subscription.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
4 weeks ago by rufous
Google will start charging Android device makers a fee for using its apps in Europe - The Verge
Jacob Kastrenakes and Nilay Patel, writing for The Verge:

There is one other key change happening here. In the past, Google required that companies building phones or tablets that included the Play Store only build phones and tablets that included the Play Store — they couldn’t make some other Android device that dropped the Play Store in favor of something else. Now, that’ll be allowed. So if Samsung wanted to ship a Galaxy phone that only included the Galaxy Apps store, it could now do that in Europe.

This seems like the real news here, not the licensing fees.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
Huawei Mate 20 Pro hands-on: a camera and spec monster - The Verge
Three cameras, a big screen, blah blah blah. What I don’t get is why every single article about Huawei phones doesn’t mention their egregious design rip-offs. Right on their default home screen, they flat out copied the icons for Music and Health from Apple. Their “live photo” icon in their camera app is ripped-off from Apple, and on and on.

This cavalier attitude toward design rip-offs might fly in China, but it shouldn’t fly here in the West, and Huawei should be called out for it in every single article until they stop doing it.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
The Google Pixel 3 Is A Very Good Phone. But Maybe Phones Have Gone Too Far.
I just loved Mat Honan’s Pixel 3 review — it’s half review of this particular phone, and half condemnation of the outsized role phones play in our lives today.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
It turns out that Facebook could in fact use data collected from its Portal in-home video device to target you with ads - Recode
Kurt Wagner, writing for Recode:

Last Monday, we wrote: “No data collected through Portal — even call log data or app usage data, like the fact that you listened to Spotify — will be used to target users with ads on Facebook.”

We wrote that because that’s what we were told by Facebook executives.

But Facebook has since reached out to change its answer: Portal doesn’t have ads, but data about who you call and data about which apps you use on Portal can be used to target you with ads on other Facebook-owned properties.

If you trust Facebook with a camera and microphone in your house, I’d love to have you at my table in a poker game.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
Apple Fixes Bagel Emoji
The original really is a crummy-looking bagel. I’m an everything bagel man, myself, but I can accept this plain one for the emoji.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
Paul Allen, Microsoft co-founder and Seahawks owner, dies at 65 | The Seattle Times
Rachel Lerman, reporting for The Seattle Times:

Paul Allen, the co-founder of Microsoft and a prominent leader of both business and philanthropy in the Seattle area, has died at age 65 from complications of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Allen died Monday afternoon, according to his multifaceted holding company Vulcan Inc., just two weeks after announcing he had restarted treatment for the cancer that he was first treated for in 2009.

Allen co-founded Redmond tech giant Microsoft with childhood friend Bill Gates. After leaving the company, he turned his focus to a wide range of other business and scientific pursuits, which including founding the Allen Institute for Brain Science, and the real estate arm of Vulcan, which went on to build much of Amazon’s campus.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
Twitter
Morgan Knutson on Twitter:

Now that Google+ has been shuttered, I should air my dirty laundry on how awful the project and exec team was.

I’m still pissed about the bait and switch they pulled by telling me I’d be working on Chrome, then putting me on this god forsaken piece of shit on day one.

Air some dirty laundry indeed. This whole thread is kind of nuts — you just don’t see former employees expose dysfunctional workplaces like this very often. Here’s a real eye-opener — teams across Google were effectively bribed to integrate Google Plus, regardless if such integration made sense for their products:

If your team, say on Gmail or Android, was to integrate Google+’s features then your team would be awarded a 1.5-3x multiplier on top of your yearly bonus. Your bonus was already something like 15% of your salary.

You read that correctly. A fuck ton of money to ruin the product you were building with bloated garbage that no one wanted. No one really liked this. People drank the kool-aid though, but mostly because it was green and made of paper.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
How Adobe is bringing “real Photoshop” to the iPad - The Verge
Dami Lee, writing for the The Verge:

Adobe really wants you to know that the upcoming Photoshop CC for the iPad, which was announced today and is set to be released sometime in 2019, is “real Photoshop.”

The phrase “real Photoshop” came up several times during my week-long preview of an early version of the software giant’s long-awaited app. The underlying code is the same as desktop Photoshop, and although the interface has been rethought for the iPad, the same core tools line the edges of the screen.

The “touch modifier” button is a great idea. It’s a button in the corner that you can press and hold to toggle the current tool. E.g. if you’re using a paintbrush, you can press the touch modifier button to turn it into the eraser. Let go of the button and your tool is back to the paintbrush.

The video here is more interesting than the article — a bunch of artists from The Verge give their thoughts on using this for their work.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
The new Palm is a tiny phone to keep you away from your phone - The Verge
Dieter Bohn, writing at The Verge:

That’s the idea behind the new Palm phone. It’s a sidecar for your phone. You should almost think of it more as a thing to get instead of a connected smartwatch than as a second phone. In fact, thinking of it as a smartwatch is a good move since that’s precisely how Verizon (and only Verizon) is selling it: as an add-on for existing plans. You can’t just go buy the thing on its own or unlocked as your primary phone.

It’s cute, and I’m glad to see someone working on smaller phones, but a secondary phone seems like something no one wants. I wish they would have tried making a phone this small that could be your primary phone.

If you want to put your phone away at night and on weekends but still stay connected, get an Apple Watch.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
Twitter
Apple’s A12 chip is the first to support the latest ARM specification, ARMv8.3, which includes instructions specifically to make JavaScript faster. Greg Parker:

More precisely: ARMv8.3 adds a new float-to-int instruction with errors and out-of-range values handled the way that JavaScript wants. The previous [instructions] to get JavaScript’s semantics were much slower. JavaScript’s numbers are double by default so it needs this conversion a lot.

Back when the iPhone XS first shipped, people noticed that it performed seemingly impossibly well on JavaScript benchmarks. E.g., David Heinemeier Hansson:

The iPhone XS is faster than an iMac Pro on the Speedometer 2.0 JavaScript benchmark. It’s the fastest device I’ve ever tested. Insane 45% jump over the iPhone 8/X chip. How does Apple do it?!

Apple touts the new A12 as “only” 15 percent faster than the A11 at CPU tasks, and JavaScript is mostly (entirely?) CPU-bound. These new instructions make that big a difference. The iMac Pro is a professional desktop and it’s getting beaten by a phone.

Everyone can enjoy the fact that ARMv8.3 makes JavaScript faster. Comp sci nerds can further enjoy the fact that we now have CPUs being optimized for a specific weird programming language and not the other way around.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
The Pixel 3: Everything You Need To Know About Google’s New Phone
I watched the Made by Google keynote video, and was in New York yesterday for some hands-on time with their new products. Nicole Nguyen’s summary of the Pixel 3 is the best I’ve seen — really does capture just about everything you should know about it. She’s got a video of the new Call Screening feature in action — man oh man, do I want that feature on iOS.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
Twitter
DuckDuckGo, on TwitteR:

DuckDuckGo fun fact: it took us seven years to reach 10 million private searches in one day, then another two years to hit 20 million, and now less than a year later we’re at 30 million!

What a great little upstart DuckDuckGo is. I’ve been using DuckDuckGo as my primary web search engine for years now, and it keeps getting better.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
Twitter makes Moments creation a desktop exclusive as it drops support from Android app - 9to5Google
Chance Miller, writing for 9to5Google:

Twitter has announced today that it is removing the ability to create Twitter Moments from its iOS and Android applications. The company says that making Moments will still be possible from the desktop web version of Twitter, while you’ll also still be able to view Moments from iOS and Android.

In a series of tweets this afternoon, Twitter explained that when features aren’t used very often, it removes them in an effort to focus on building other features. In this instance, support for creating Twitter Moments through the iOS and Android applications has been around since 2016, so it’s certainly noticeable to see Twitter pulling the plug on the capability.

If Moments isn’t getting enough use, sure, kill the feature. But kill it everywhere. It makes no sense to keep it but make it desktop-only. Mobile is where people use Twitter most.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
5 weeks ago by rufous
Wi-Fi Switches from Obscure Protocol Names to Simple Generation Numbers - TidBITS
Glenn Fleishman — who knows more about Wi-Fi than anyone I know — explains the whole “Wi-Fi 6” thing:

The Wi-Fi Alliance’s new numbering system focuses on generations of speed improvements but looks back only to 802.11n, which is a decade old. Given that 802.11a and 802.11b were approved at the same time, implicitly calling them Wi-Fi 1 and Wi-Fi 2, and extending Wi-Fi 3 to 802.11g, isn’t quite right. But we anticipate people will do it anyway.

Simplifying device compatibility through better naming seems like a clever idea that’s long overdue, and one that should help people who have no interest in technical standards arcana. The next time someone asks me what Wi-Fi router they should buy, I look forward to saying, “Wi-Fi 6. Look for it on the box.”

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
6 weeks ago by rufous
Not Voting Doubles the Value of Someone Else’s Vote
David Foster Wallace, back in 2000:

If you are bored and disgusted by politics and don’t bother to vote, you are in effect voting for the entrenched Establishments of the two major parties, who please rest assured are not dumb, and who are keenly aware that it is in their interests to keep you disgusted and bored and cynical and to give you every possible psychological reason to stay at home doing one-hitters and watching MTV on primary day. By all means stay home if you want, but don’t bullshit yourself that you’re not voting. In reality, there is no such thing as not voting: you either vote by voting, or you vote by staying home and tacitly doubling the value of some Diehard’s vote.

Jason Kottke:

Please check your registration status and register to vote… it takes two minutes. [Voter registration deadlines][2] are fast approaching in many US states — there are deadlines tomorrow in Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas.

Kottke wrote that yesterday, so those registration deadlines are today. I don’t care who you want to vote for, I implore you to register and vote. And if you think you are registered, double-check. It really does just take a minute.

[2]; https://ift.tt/2IGE1dj

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
6 weeks ago by rufous
Risky Business Feature: Named source in "The Big Hack" has doubts about the story - Risky Business
Hardware security Joe Fitzpatrick was one of the very few named sources in Bloomberg’s blockbuster “The Big Hack” story. He provided only background information on the potential of hardware exploits in general — he claimed no knowledge of this specific case. On Patrick Gray’s Risky Business (great name) podcast, he expresses serious unease with the story Bloomberg published. The whole episode is worth a listen, but here’s partial transcript:

Fitzpatrick: But what really struck me is that like all the details that were even remotely technical, seemed like they had been lifted from from the conversations I had about theoretically how hardware implants work and how the devices I was making to show off at black hat two years ago worked.

Gray: So I guess what you are saying here is, the report, I mean all of the technical details of the report, you’d covered that ground with that reporter.

Fitzpatrick: Yeah, I had conversations about all the technical details and various contexts. But there are a lot of filters that happen, you know? When I explain hardware things even to software people, I don’t expect people to get it the first time and I don’t expect people to be able to describe it accurately all the time. So there is definitely a lot of telephone exchange happening

Gray: OK but why did that make you feel uneasy? Could it be the case that you know that the technical things you told him lined up perfectly with the technical things that some of these 17 of the anonymous sources told him?

Fitzpatrick: You know, I’m just Joe. I do this stuff solo. I am building hardware implants for phones to show off at conferences. I’m not a pro at building hardware implants. I don’t work for any nation or any state building and shipping these as products. I feel like I have a good grasp at what’s possible and what’s available and how to do it just from my practice. But it was surprising to me that in a scenario where I would describe these things and then he would go and confirm these and 100 percent of what I described was confirmed by sources.

Gray: And that’s what he was telling you through this process?

Fitzpatrick: That’s what I read in the article.

Gray: OK, right. You find that a bit strange? That every single thing you seem to tell him, or a large proportion of what you told him, was then confirmed by his other sources.

Fitzpatrick: Yeah, basically. Either I have excellent foresight or something else is going on.

I’m going to go with “something else is going on”.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
6 weeks ago by rufous
Facebook unveils the Portal, a video chat camera for the people who still trust Facebook
Geoffrey Fowler, writing for The Washington Post:

The Portal is a sleek new video camera and screen that makes chats with family and friends look great.

It has just one problem: It was made by Mark Zuckerberg.

On Monday, Facebook unveiled the $200 Portal, the first-ever consumer hardware from the world’s largest social network. The toaster-size gadget, along with a larger $350 version called Portal+, is a cross between a smart speaker, video camera and digital photo frame. But at a time when CEO Zuckerberg’s privacy and security decisions are a matter of congressional inquiry, how many people will trust one in their living room?

Say what you want about putting any of these always-on listening devices in your home, anyone who buys one of these — which doesn’t just listen but has a camera too — is nuts. Is there any company you’d trust less than Facebook with this?

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
6 weeks ago by rufous
HyperJuice: World's Most Powerful USB-C Battery Pack by HYPER by Sanho Corporation —Kickstarter
My thanks to Hyper for sponsoring Daring Fireball this week to promote HyperJuice, their airline-safe 27,000 mAh battery pack with dual USB-C ports (100W and 60W) and one 18W USB-A port. All three ports can be used at once, so you can charge a 15-inch MacBook Pro, a smaller MacBook or iPad Pro, and an iPhone all once, all at high speeds.

Using the 100W USB-C input, you can recharge HyperJuice from empty to full in about one hour using a MacBook Pro’s charger. HyperJuice weighs only 550 grams and can fit in the palm of your hand. It’s a lot of power in a small package.

It’s a Kickstarter project that has already been funded (many times over). The campaign ends on Monday so act quickly — right now you can order HyperJuice for up to 50 percent off the expected retail price. Over 5,700 backers have already pledged over $1 million to get HyperJuice at these discounted prices.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
6 weeks ago by rufous
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

$AMZN  aboveavalon  adblock  adblockers  advertising  afghanistan  airpods  akamai  albums  alien  al_qaeda  amazon  america  analysis  android  animation  apfs  apple  apple_car  apps  appstore  backups  bandwidth  benchmarks  benedict_evans  bicycles  bin_laden  bourbon  brent_simmons  browsers  bugs  bundling  business  cabel  caching  cameras  cars  cdn  celebrity  ces  charts  chewbacca  china  chris_sacca  cia  clones  cocktails  cocoa  colbert  color  color_management  comedy  command_line  comparison  complexity  compositing  compression  confederate  conspiracy_theories  corporation_tax  craig_hockenberry  crowdfunding  cryptography  css  culture  daringfireball  dark_net  design  development  diffie_hellman  disney  disneyland  downsampling  economics  editing  election  email  emoji  encryption  engagement  eu  evan_williams  fashion  firewatch  fonts  fortune  fraud  gender  gerrymandering  git  gizmodo  google  google_x  gravitational_waves  growth_rates  gun_control  hans_zimmer  hardware  healthkit  history  icloud  imdb  impressions  instagram  internet_of_things  interview  ios  ipad  iphone  iphone6  iphone_se  ireland  iwatch  javascript  jay_leno  jean-louis_gassée  jeff_bezos  journalism  kickstarter  kickstarters  kubrick  late_night_comedy  law  legacy  letterman  ligo  logos  loren_brichter  lrb  luxury  mac  macbook  maciej_ceglowski  magicband  manufacturing  mark_gurman  materials  mathematics  matte_paintings  matt_yglesias  memory  messaging  metrics  mg_siegler  microsoft  military  mix  mobile  morals  movies  music  navy_seals  netflix  news  nytimes  obama  objective-c  old_fashioned  onboarding  osx  painting  pakistan  panic_software  parc  pc  performance  petrol  philadelphia  photography  pixels  policy  politics  power_laws  president  privacy  production_design  programming  qnx  r&d  racism  react.js  rebranding  reference  republicans  research  researchkit  resolution  retina  review  risk  safari  samsung  satire  second_amendment  security  set_design  sexism  snl  soundtracks  star_wars  streaming  suits  swift  tablet  tabletcomputer  taxis  techcrunch  testing  the_force_awakens  the_shining  thunderbolt  torture  transcoding  trends  trump  truth  tv  twitter  typography  u2  uber  ui  unicode  usb  via:daringfireball  visualization  vox  walt_disney  watches  watchkit  web  webdesign  webdev  webkit  webviews  wes_anderson  yosemite  watch 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: