robertogreco + wearables   93

BYBORRE - Mastering Knit
"Byborre is an Amsterdam based textile innovation studio working on the frontiers of material development, functionality and aesthetics through engineered knits.

Signature to Byborre are the innovative hand-rendered techniques that, through direct interaction with their circular knitting machines, give the studio full creative freedom to play with patterns, colours, and textures within their fabrics. Designing from the yarn up allows Byborre to discover new possibilities both within their own collections and for leading brands.

Over the past six years Byborre has worked with clients such as Nike, wings+horns, The North Face, and Daniel Arsham. Through consultation and collaboration with other brands, Byborre pushes knit innovation to find creative ways to achieve the project’s goal. The archetypical clothing pieces in the studio’s own label tell an important story about the relationship between material and machine, along with introducing a new approach to fashion where process and product are equally important.

Over the past six years Byborre has worked with clients such as Nike, wings+horns, The North Face, and Daniel Arsham. Through consultation and collaboration with other brands, Byborre pushes knit innovation to find creative ways to achieve the project’s goal. The archetypical clothing pieces in the studio’s own label tell an important story about the relationship between material and machine, along with introducing a new approach to fashion where process and product are equally important."
clothing  uniform  fashion  glvo  projectideas  amsterdam  materials  knits  knitting  design  clothes  wearable  wearables  byborre  textiles 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
Espacio y sujeto | Arquine
"Pienso que la arquitectura comienza por la ropa y gradualmente va creciendo; de la ropa pasamos a las herramientas y de las herramientas al mobiliario, que prácticamente es como la primera morada."



"El problema viene cuando se relaciona con museos y se vuelve una nueva versión de iglesia. Como sucede en las iglesias, forma parte de la vida cotidiana donde las cosas no se tocan."



"Cuando veo o leo cosas demasiado abstractas siento que es algo que necesita de una creencia a la fuerza, como pasa con la religión, por esto mismo la arquitectura mas específica y detallada como Archigram da una esperanza que tal vez eso puede funcionar o pueda ser construida."
vitoacconci  art  design  museums  archigram  2013  clothes  clothing  wearables  experience  details 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Cosmic Bitcasting. A wearable radiation detector. on Vimeo
"“Cosmic Bitcasting” is a digital art and science project that emerges from the idea of connecting the human body with the invisible universe that surrounds us by creating a wearable interface that will provide sensory information on the gamma radiation, X-rays, and alpha and beta particles that pass through our bodies by triggering a series of embedded actuators (lights and vibration).

The wearable prototype has been developed at Etopia - Center for Art and Technology in Zaragoza, Spain as part of the residency program Reverberadas. The project consisting in the wearable radiation detector on the video - using one Geiger-Müller tube, as well as a textile cosmic ray (muon) detector - using two GM tubes.
Cosmic Bitcasting is currently being exhibited at Etopia where it will remain until September 2016.

A project by Afroditi Psarra and Cécile Lapoire."
afroditipsarra  cécilelapoire  urbanspcesuit  radiation  wearable  wearables  2016 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Designing a better umbrella | Caterina.net
"Umbrellas, as we know, blow inside out in the wind, and require the person holding it to sacrifice the use of one of their hands. Shouldn’t we all be using Knups? Knups are made from banana leaves lashed to a frame of bamboo. They are worn rather than carried, which allows you to use your hands. And if you lean into the wind, they won’t blow inside out, or away.

So often traditional designs are superior to modern designs. Knups are the traditional umbrellas of Northern India, and are here being used in the wettest place on earth, Mawsynram, which has over 38 feet of rain a year."

[See also: http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2014/08/meghalaya-the-wettest-place-on-earth/100797/ ]
umbrellas  india  knups  design  caterinafake  2015  wearable  wearables 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Close at Hand — Medium
"In a very real way, what people tuck into their pockets signals what they care about. Ötzi the Iceman carried fungus to make fire. Japanese men in the Edo period carried medicine and seals. Queen Elizabeth I carried a miniature jewel-encrusted devotional book. European women in the 18th century carried money, jewelry, personal grooming implements, and even food. Here in 2015, we carry cellphones?--?never letting them out of our sight.

If what we put in our pockets is important, to advertise a product as pocketable is to imply that it's indispensable: something you'll always want by your side. Pocket watch manufacturers adopted this approach early; purveyors of pocket knives, pocket handkerchiefs, and pocket books (also known as paperbacks) followed suit. Technologies all, these tools still seem primitive relative to slim electronic bricks we haul around today. To find a direct ancestor of the cellphone, we need only look back as far as 1970: the year the pocket calculator was born."



"Pockets matter because they’re personal. What we wear at our waists is at least as intimate as what we wear on our wrists, and what we’ve worn there over the centuries tells us a lot about who we are, how we’ve changed, and how we’ve stayed the same. We’re greedy; we’re vain; we’re hungry; we’re late. We want to start fires and listen to a thousand songs."

[via: http://kottke.org/15/09/the-history-of-technology-is-the-history-of-pockets ]
dianakimball  pockets  history  clothing  clothes  wearable  wearables  technology  2015  uniformproject  via:audreywatters 
september 2015 by robertogreco
threadbared
"THREADBARED is an evolving collaboration between two clotheshorse academics to discuss the politics, aesthetics, histories, theories, cultures and subcultures that go by the names “fashion” and “beauty.” With commentary on how clothes matter, as well as book and exhibit reviews and interviews with scholars and artists, THREADBARED considers the critical importance of taking clothes –and the bodies that design, manufacture, disseminate, and wear them– seriously as an entry point into dialogue about the world around us.

We welcome queries relating to public comments, invited talks, commissioned essays, and books, films, and videos for review on THREADBARED! Check out our press, and book us for your event.

Please email us at threadbared dot matters at gmail dot com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

Mimi Thi Nguyen is an associate professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her first book, The Gift of Freedom: War, Debt, and Other Refugee Passages, focuses on the promise of “giving” freedom concurrent and contingent on waging war and its afterlife. (Duke University Press, Fall 2012). With her second project on the obligations of beauty, she continues to pursue her scholarship through the frame of transnational feminist cultural studies, and in particular as an untangling of the liberal way of war that pledges “aid,” freedom, movement, and other social goods. She is co-editor with Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu of Alien Encounters: Popular Culture in Asian America (Duke University Press, 2007), and co-editor with Fiona I.B. Ngo and Mariam Lam of a special issue of positions: east asia cultures critique on Southeast Asian diasporas (2012). A former zinester, Punk Planet columnist, and Maximumrocknroll shitworker, she is widely published on punk and queer subcultures and also blogs at Thread & Circuits, where you can find all her old columns and some zine writings archived. For more about Nguyen, see here.

Minh-Ha T. Pham is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate Media Studies Program at Pratt Institute. Before coming to Pratt, she was an Assistant Professor of Visual Studies and Asian American Studies at Cornell University. Her first book, Asians Who Wear Clothes on the Internet: Race, Gender, and the Work of Personal Style Blogging, is forthcoming from Duke University Press in Fall/Winter 2015. Her writings on the politics of fashion, fashion technology, and consumption have been published in a wide range of academic journals and popular magazines. She also blogs at the Huffington Post and Of Another Fashion. And now, you can follow her on Twitter (@minh81)! For more information, click here."
mimithinguyen  fashion  blogs  minh-hatpham  glvo  clothing  clothes  wearables  uniformproject  politics  subcultures  aesthetics  beauty 
august 2015 by robertogreco
The Next Black - A film about the Future of Clothing - YouTube
"The Next Black' is a documentary film that explores the future of clothing. Watch as we meet with some of the most innovative companies on the planet to get their opinion on clothing and its future, including: heroes of sustainability, Patagonia; tech-clothing giants, Studio XO; sportswear icon, adidas; and Biocouture, a consultancy exploring living organisms to grow clothing and accessories.

Learn more about the project: http://www.aeg-home.com/thenextblack

Join the discussion on Facebook, Twitter and on the hashtag #thenextblack

https://www.facebook.com/pages/AEG-Global/586037381449750
https://twitter.com/aeg_global "

[See also:
http://www.studio-xo.com/
http://www.biocouture.co.uk/
http://www.patagonia.com/us/worn-wear
https://www.ifixit.com/Patagonia
http://www.patagonia.com/us/worn-wear-repairs
http://www.patagonia.com/email/11/112811.html
http://www.patagonia.com/us/patagonia.go?assetid=106223
http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/ad-day-patagonia-136745
https://www.patagonia.com/us/patagonia.go?assetid=2388
http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2013-11-25/patagonias-confusing-and-effective-campaign-to-grudgingly-sell-stuff ]
design  documentary  fashion  video  clothes  clothing  glvo  reuse  mending  repair  materials  textiles  studioxo  biocouture  adidas  patagonia  recycling  waste  consumerism  consumption  capitalism  biology  wearable  wearables  suzannelee  technology  nancytilbury  suzanne  slow  slowfashion  fastfashion  dyes  dying  industry  manufacturing  globalization  environment  rickridgeway  uniformproject  customization  ifixit  diy  alteration  resuse  repairing 
july 2015 by robertogreco
FUTURE CLASSICS©
"The FUTURE CLASSICS© fashion label was established in 2000 by designer Julie Wilkins and swiftly achieved acclaim for cleverly constructed jersey pieces based on exploring and extending the grammar of the T shirt. The label moved on to incorporate knitwear, tailoring and a dress line with the aim of creating a mainframe of clever clothing where the dialogue between the traditional and the modern, the avant garde and the conservative are played out.

A major part of the FUTURE CLASSICS© ethos is the studied deconstruction of conventional dress forms. Adaptability and multiple, idiosyncratic possibilities of wear are also key features. The label re-launched in 2014 as a FASHION, MUSIC, OTHER brand."

[via: http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/spinoza-in-a-t-shirt/ ]
futureclassics  clothing  glvo  fashion  wearable  wearables  juliewilkins  personaluniforms 
july 2015 by robertogreco
How textiles revolutionised technology – Virginia Postrel – Aeon
"Older than bronze and as new as nanowires, textiles are technology — and they have remade our world time and again"

"In February 1939, Vogue ran a major feature on the fashions of the future. Inspired by the soon-to-open New York World’s Fair, the magazine asked nine industrial designers to imagine what the people of ‘a far Tomorrow’ might wear and why. (The editors deemed fashion designers too of-the-moment for such speculations.) A mock‑up of each outfit was manufactured and photographed for a lavish nine-page colour spread.

You might have seen some of the results online: an evening dress with a see-through net top and strategically placed swirls of gold braid, for instance, or a baggy men’s jumpsuit with a utility belt and halo antenna. Bloggers periodically rediscover a British newsreel of models demonstrating the outfits while a campy narrator (‘Oh, swish!’) makes laboured jokes. The silly get‑ups are always good for self-satisfied smirks. What dopes those old-time prognosticators were!

The ridicule is unfair. Anticipating climate-controlled interiors, greater nudity, more athleticism, more travel and simpler wardrobes, the designers actually got a lot of trends right. Besides, the mock‑ups don’t reveal what really made the predicted fashions futuristic. Looking only at the pictures, you can’t detect the most prominent technological theme.

‘The important improvements and innovations in clothes for the World of Tomorrow will be in the fabrics themselves,’ declared Raymond Loewy, one of the Vogue contributors. His fellow visionaries agreed. Every single one talked about textile advances. Many of their designs specified yet-to-be-invented materials that could adjust to temperature, change colour or be crushed into suitcases without wrinkling. Without exception, everyone foretelling the ‘World of Tomorrow’ believed that an exciting future meant innovative new fabrics.

They all understood something we’ve largely forgotten: that textiles are technology, more ancient than bronze and as contemporary as nanowires. We hairless apes co-evolved with our apparel. But, to reverse Arthur C Clarke’s adage, any sufficiently familiar technology is indistinguishable from nature. It seems intuitive, obvious – so woven into the fabric of our lives that we take it for granted.

We drag out heirloom metaphors – ‘on tenterhooks’, ‘tow-headed’, ‘frazzled’ – with no idea that we’re talking about fabric and fibres. We repeat threadbare clichés: ‘whole cloth’, ‘hanging by a thread’, ‘dyed in the wool’. We catch airline shuttles, weave through traffic, follow comment threads. We talk of lifespans and spin‑offs and never wonder why drawing out fibres and twirling them into thread looms so large in our language."



"As late as the 1970s, textiles still enjoyed the aura of science. Since then, however, we’ve stopped thinking of them as a technical achievement. In today’s popular imagination, fabric entirely belongs to the frivolous world of fashion. Even in the pages of Vogue, ‘wearable technology’ means electronic gadgets awkwardly tricked out as accessories, not the soft stuff you wear against your skin – no matter how much brainpower went into producing it. When we imagine economic progress, we no longer think about cloth, or even the machines that make it.

This cultural amnesia has multiple causes. The rise of computers and software as the very definition of ‘high technology’ eclipsed other industries. Intense global competition drove down prices of fibres and fabric, making textiles and apparel a less noticeable part of household budgets, and turning textile makers into unglamorous, commodity businesses. Environmental campaigns made synthetic a synonym for toxic. And for the first time in human history, generations of women across the developed world grew up without learning the needle arts."



"Textiles illustrate a more general point about technology. The more advanced a field is, the more blasé we are about its latest upgrades. Success breeds indifference. We still expect Moore’s Law to hold, but we no longer get excited about the latest microprocessor. The public has largely forgotten the silicon in Silicon Valley.

New and improved fabric technologies haven’t attracted public enthusiasm since the backlash against leisure suits and disco shirts made synthetics declassé in the early 1980s. ‘Pity poor polyester. People pick on it,’ wrote The Wall Street Journal’s Ronald Alsop in 1982, describing DuPont’s efforts to rehabilitate the fibre’s image.

What ended the consumer hatred of polyester wasn’t a marketing campaign. It was a quiet series of technical innovations: the development of microfibres. These are synthetics, most often polyester or nylon, that are thinner than silk and incredibly soft, as well as lightweight, strong, washable and quick-drying. Their shapes can be engineered to control how water vapour and heat pass through the fabric or to create microcapsules to add sunscreen, antimicrobial agents or insect repellent. Over the past decade, microfibres have become ubiquitous; they’re found in everything from wickable workout wear to supersoft plush toys.

Microfibres are one reason the ‘air-conditioned’ fabrics Loewy and his fellow designers foresaw in 1939 have finally come to pass. These fabrics just aren’t promoted in the pages of Vogue or highlighted on the racks at Banana Republic. They don’t attract attention during New York Fashion Week. Their tribe gathers instead at the big Outdoor Retailer trade shows held twice a year in Salt Lake City. There, outdoor-apparel makers and their suppliers tout textiles that keep wearers warm in the cold and cool in the heat; that block raindrops but allow sweat to escape; that repel insects, screen out UV rays and control odour. By establishing that truly weather-resistant fabrics were possible, Gore-Tex (first sold in 1976) and Polartec synthetic fleece (1979) created an industry where engineers now vie to find ever-better ways to conquer the elements. For instance, ‘smart textiles’ originally developed for spacesuits use microencapsulated materials that melt when they get hot, keeping wearers comfortable by absorbing body heat; when temperatures fall, the materials solidify and warm the body."



"Reducing textiles to their functional properties misses much of their appeal, however. They’ve always been decorative as well, a source of sensory pleasure going all the way back to the sexy string skirts worn by Stone Age women. That’s why dyes have been so important in the history of chemistry and trade.

In our computer-centric era, the pursuit of beautiful textiles has naturally turned to information technology. Over the past decade, inkjet printing on fabric has taken off. Instead of requiring a separate plate for each colour, digital printing registers the entire design at once. So for the first time, designers can use as many colours, and as varied patterns, as they choose. Although it currently accounts for less than 5 per cent of printed fabrics, digital printing has already changed the way clothes look. It’s the technology driving the colourful prints so prominent in recent women’s fashion, as well as the crowdsourced design sites Threadless and Spoonflower.

The customers who’ve embraced those designs don’t think much about what makes them possible. But the very invisibility of textiles testifies to their power. We think of them as natural. The instinct behind ‘wearable technology’ is sound, even if the products so far are awkward. ‘Imagine a textile structured from a blend of different fibres which each function as component within a circuit, for example, battery fibres, solar fibres and antenna fibres,’ writes the US fashion technologist Amanda Parkes in an op-ed for the website Business of Fashion. ‘The material itself becomes a self-sustaining “textile circuit” that has its own power and interactive capabilities, but the embedded technology is essentially invisible.’

If the goal is to shrink the distance between nature and artifice, us and it, no technology is as powerful as fabric. Intimate and essential, it touches every moment of our lives. It is among the greatest products of human artifice. Yet it is also an extension of our skin."
textiles  glvo  virginiapostrel  history  clothing  crafts  culture  technology  2015  wearables  materials  industrialrevolution  fashion  craft  dyes  machines  printing  science  adamsmith  raymondloewy  arthurcclarke  dupont  synthetics  fabrics  fabric  elizabethbarber  williampetty  davidorban  josephmariejacquard  weaving  looms  knitting  spinning  craigmuldrew  jameshargreaves  richardarkwright  beverlylemire  samuelcrompton  1939  vogue  microfibres  gore-tex  polartec  ministryofsupply  mizzenandmain  yicui  materialsscience  threadless  spoonflower  amandaparkes  future  making  cv 
june 2015 by robertogreco
No one cares about your jetpack: on optimism in futurism - Dangerous to those who profit from the way things areDangerous to those who profit from the way things are
"This review [http://paleofuture.gizmodo.com/tomorrowland-is-like-watching-a-jetpack-eat-itself-1706822006 ] of Disney’s Tomorrowland (and others like it that I have read) got me thinking about something I was asked at the Design In Action summit last week in Edinburgh. I was there participating in the “Once Upon a Future” event, where I read a story called “The Dreams in the Bitch House.” It’s about a tech sorority at a small New England university. And programmable matter.

After I did my keynote and read my story, I did a Q&A. After a few questions, someone in the audience asked: “Why so negative?”

I get this question a lot. I’ve been involved in a couple of “optimistic” science fiction anthologies, namely Shine (edited by Jetse de Vries) and Hieroglyph (edited by Kathryn Cramer and Ed Finn). But people don’t invite me to these because I’m an optimistic person. In fact, it’s usually quite the opposite. Evidence:

[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InDOzrtS42M ]

When I was trained as a futurist (I have a Master’s in the subject), I was taught to see the whole scope of a problem. That’s at the root of design thinking. The old joke about designers is that when someone asks how many designers you need to change a lightbulb, the designer asks “Does it need to be a lightbulb?” Because really, what the room needs is a window. When people talk about innovation, that’s what they mean. A re-framing of the issue that helps you see the whole problem and approach it from another angle.

America’s problem is not that it needs more jetpacks. Jetpacks are not innovation. Jetpacks are a fetish object for retrofuturist otaku who jerked off to Judy Jetson, or maybe Jennifer Connelly’s character in The Rocketeer. “We were promised jetpacks!” they whine. Yeah, dude, but what you got was Agent Orange. Imagine a Segway that could kill you and set your house on fire. That’s what a jetpack is.

Jetpacks solve exactly one problem: rapid transit. And you know what would help with that? Better transit. Better telepresence. Better work-life balance. Are jetpacks an innovative solution to the problem of transit? Nope. But they sure look great with your midlife crisis.

But railing against jetpacks isn’t an answer to the question. Why so negative? Three reasons:

1) We have more data than we used to, and we’re obtaining more all the time.

Why don’t we fantasize about life in space like we used to? Because we know it’s really fucking difficult and dangerous. Why don’t we research things like food pills any more? Because we know eating fibre helps prevent colon cancer. We know those things because we’ve done the science. The data is there, and for every piece of technology we use, we accumulate more. It’s hard to argue with that vast wealth of data. At least, it’s hard to do so without looking like some whackjob climate change denier.

2) Less optimistic futures have the power to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.

When people ask me, “Why can’t you be more positive?” what I hear is, “Why can’t you tell me a story that conforms to my narrative and comforts me?” Because discomfiting futures have real power. As Alf Rehn notes:
What we need, then, is more uncommon futurism. A futurism that cares not a whit about what’s hot right now, who remain stoically unimpressed by drones and wearable IT, and who instead take it as their job to shock and awe CEOs with visions as radical as those of the futurists of yore. We need futurism that is less interested in agreeing with contemporary futurists and their ongoing circle-jerk, and who takes pride in offending and disgusting those futurists who would like to protect the status quo.


The truth is that the horrible dystopia you’re reading about is already happening to someone else, somewhere else. What makes people nervous is the idea that it could happen to them. That’s why I have to keep sharing it.

3) The most harmful idea in this world is that change is impossible.

Octavia E. Butler said it best: “The only lasting truth / is Change.” And yet, we act like change is impossible. Whether we’re frustrated by policy gridlock, or rolling our eyes at Hollywood reboots, or taking our spouses on the same goddamn date we have for for twenty years, we act as though everything will remain the same, forever and ever, amen. But look around you. Twenty years ago, thinks were very different. Even five years ago, they were different. Look at social progress like gay marriage. Look at the rise of solar power. Look at the shrinking of the ice caps. Things do change, they are changing, and they will change. And not all of those changes will be positive. Not all of them will be negative, either. But change does occur. Rather than thinking of change as a positive or a negative, as utopian or dystopian, just recognize that it’s going to happen and prepare yourself. Futurists don’t predict the future. We see multiple outcomes and help you prepare for them.

In the end, the lacklustre performance of Tomorrowland at the box office has nothing to do with whether optimism is alive or dead. It has to do with changing demographics among moviegoers who know how to spot an Ayn Rand bedtime story when they see one. There are whole generations of moviegoers for whom jetpacks don’t mean shit, whose first memories of NASA are the Challenger disaster. And you know what? Those same generations believe in driverless cars, solar energy, smart cities, AR contacts, and vat-grown meat. They saw the election of America’s first black president, and they witnessed a wave of violence against young black men. They don’t want the depiction of an “optimistic” future. They want a future where their concerns are taken seriously and humanely, with compassion and intelligence and validation. And that’s way harder than optimism."
culture  future  futurism  discourse  madelineashby  2015  tomorrowland  alfrehn  dystopia  octaviabutler  optimism  pessimism  realism  demographics  aynrand  race  establishment  privilege  drones  wearables  power  innovation  jetpacks  telepresence  transit  transportation  work  labor  scifi  sciencefiction  systemsthinking  data  retrofuturism  climatechange  space  food  science  technology  change  truth  socialprogress  progress  solar  solarpower  validation  compassion  canon  work-lifebalance 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Intimate Spaces: The Archaeology of Pockets | Archaeology and Material Culture
"Few spaces could be more familiar yet more unremarked upon than pockets. Clothing pockets are a presence of sorts, but like edges of an excavation unit their material definition may be made by their tangible boundaries and the things in them rather than the vacuum that is perhaps the actual pocket. Pockets are distinctively intimate since they are stitched into our public garments yet conceal our bodies, and they hold a narrow range of small things like coins, keys, wallets, phones, makeup, lighters, and similar objects that for various reasons are held close to our bodies and accessible to our hands. There are some idiosyncratic but illuminating insights into privacy, place, and self that can be made based on an “excavation” of pockets and the cargo that finds refuge in them.

Maybe our use of some pockets is largely functional, like a right-hander who habitually slides their key chain into their readily accessible right front pants pocket. Yet many pocket use patterns are the complicated result of longstanding practices and the vagaries of fashion. For instance, men’s back pants pockets often betray “billfold bulge,” which is even worse in the face of contour-hugging skinny jeans and similar cuts. In 1977, the Palm Beach Post assessed increasingly lean European pants cuts and pocket-less pants and recognized pocket use was a force of habit, concluding that “most men just don’t feel comfortable unless everything is in the same place its been for years.” Thirty years later Details advised that there “is absolutely no need for you to shove an engorged wallet in the pocket of your $400 jeans.” They concluded that “the contemporary pocket-stuffer is one of three things: an oblivious creature of habit, a man too insecure to carry a shoulder bag, or someone lacking the organizational skills to pare down the clutter that sits like a benign tumor on his right cheek to a couple of $100 bills and an AmEx.”

Much of pocket use is rooted in ideological notions of gender, class, and sexuality, historical fashion styles, and unexamined pocket use habits. Since the late 19th century masculinity ideologies and fashion have cast pockets as somehow distinctively “masculine” reserves. In the 18th century women’s garments included concealed pockets, with expansive tie pockets under dresses and petticoats in use for roughly two centuries. Garments began to include far fewer pockets in the late 19th century as dresses and coats became more streamlined and the handbag became the carry-all of choice for women. In 1899 a New York Times commentator noted the gradual disappearance of women’s garment pockets and remembered that “our grandmothers . . . used to have big, deep pockets in their skirts which they could get at somehow and in which they usually carried the household keys, a ball of yarn with knitting needles stuck in it, a little smooth-worn gourd for darning operations, and very often a few doughnuts or cookies and apples and a pair of spectacles.”

[via: http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2015/02/pockets.html ]
pockets  archaeology  everyday  carrying  inventories  2015  handbags  backpacks  contents  objects  history  anthropology  abrahamlincoln  clothing  wearables  wearable  gender  georgelegrady  jasontravis  erintaylor  lindaalstead  rafaellozano-hemmer  francoisrobert  hannahsmithallen  meredithbrickell 
march 2015 by robertogreco
REDEF (Interest Mix): A FashionREDEF ORIGINAL: A Q&A With Abe Burmeister and Tyler Clemens, Founders of Outlier
"Q: When I say wearable technology, what's the first thing that comes to mind?

Abe Burmeister: Um. I'm gonna go take a nap.

We spend a lot of time reading about the history of apparel, and the Industrial Revolution started with spinning jenny machines to power cotton mills. None of that stuff ended up in your clothes. It changed how clothes were made radically, but there's no motors in your clothes, right? Like, almost none of it actually made it into the clothes. Velcro is a very simple machine. A zipper is really the main thing that came out of it that made it into your clothes.

So, there's an information revolution going on, and it's going to radically change how clothes are made, but whether it ends up inside your clothing, who knows? A lot of people are trying, and I think some interesting stuff will happen, but we'll have to wait and see.

I don't see any of it as inevitable. It's inevitable that it will change the environment around apparel. We'll see about the watch. Ringly just got a bunch of funding, maybe that's something.

Personally, I'm trying to eliminate as many beeps and buzzes from my life, so, it's interesting. I'm probably going to buy an Apple watch just to see what it's like. But, at the same time, I'm like, "You know what? I'm trying to turn off as many of those buzzes as possible, not get them closer to me.""



"Q: If you guys had to bet on one of these information revolution era technologies to vastly change how we are producing clothing, whether that's 3D printing or VR fitting rooms, what would you put your money on?

Tyler Clemens: For me, I think it has something to do with health. So, if there's a way to put—

Abe Burmeister: To me it's been, and I'm surprised this wasn't Tyler's answer, actually, but we've been looking at bonding technology and how garments are actually put together. It's super labor intensive.

We make most of our stuff in the U.S. We visit the factories where we're fairly certain people are getting paid at least minimum wage, they're treated well, they're not locked in, you know, things like that.

That was a really early lesson when I started visiting the Garment District. I was like, "I have no idea what a sweatshop is." You have this vision in your head, like, sweatshop, but when you actually start going into the ground, you don't know what it is.

It's immigrant labor. There's never been any success in getting anybody but the bottom rungs of the economic labor market to sew on a mass level, right? So, you even see it in China. People don't want to be sewing anymore. The market's moving to Vietnam. And there's also fantastic, really beautiful, high-end factories emerging there, which is great.

But to me, chasing the labor to the bottom rung... We're less price-sensitive than more commodity-driven companies, but if our factories said, "Hey, the price doubles tomorrow," we wouldn't be happy. Even though we'd be happy the workers would be getting paid more.

Eventually, if the world is going to keep developing in a positive way, we need to eliminate this kind of drudge-type labor that's very repetitive. I'd rather have a world where people weren't running the same garment through the machine every day, the same stitch. That's the kind of job that would be great if it disappeared, right?

There is a pleasure in making a garment. You know, you're producing something real. But, at the same time, I'm not lining up for a job at a sewing factory. Almost nobody with fluent English capabilities is in America. I think you get the same kind of echoing throughout other countries as well. Italy, they're bringing workers in from China to make "made in Italy" garments.

And in China, we've talked to factories that are like, "Yeah, you know, the people just don't come back. They go away for Chinese New Year and half of them don't come back. They want jobs where they can sit at a computer all day now."

The bonding technology's interesting. The 3D printing, I think, is a long way off. Maybe one day it emerges.

Some people actually try to call it 3D printing, but the more advanced knitting technologies can pretty much just print out a sweater, which is pretty cool. So, stuff like that, I think, is where I would like to see the change happen, and where we're putting some energy in."

[via: “Very interesting interview w/ the founders of @Outlier. ⌘F "sewing" for a provocative section… http://www.mediaredefined.com/a-fashionredef-original-a-qa-w-1009251383.html
https://twitter.com/robinsloan/status/570641334530236417

and

“takes while to get going but this interview is interesting as hell http://www.mediaredefined.com/a-fashionredef-original-a-qa-w-1009251383.html via @robinsloan ” [+screenshot of the question and opening lines about wearable technology]
https://twitter.com/doingitwrong/status/570696532749647873 ]

[Some follow-up:
“@doingitwrong @robinsloan Thanks for this. Thinking about our family relationship to sewing. ”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570719008506257409

“@doingitwrong @robinsloan But also thinking about pockets as wearable technology. https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/t:pockets Joinery. Access.”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570719257949970432

“@rogre @doingitwrong Wow I would love to read your extended thoughts on this! Grecolaborativo & sewing as social media (??)”
https://twitter.com/robinsloan/status/570755963361177600

“@robinsloan @doingitwrong On it.

For now…
1. @vruba http://tinyletter.com/vruba/letters/6-14-america … and @bldgblog https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:b0b610fa3b45
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570802756438503424

“@robinsloan @doingitwrong
2. visual stimuli
http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/tagged/sewing/

3. mending
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/t:mending
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570803959666855937

“@robinsloan @doingitwrong
4. @LangeAlexandra “3D printers have a lot to learn
from the sewing machine”
http://www.dezeen.com/2014/05/08/3d-printers-have-a-lot-to-learn-from-the-sewing-machine/
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570804635725725696

“@robinsloan @doingitwrong
and

5. tailoring (no refs, other than if falling under the solarpunk umbrella)
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:7bab45bb0cb5
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570804967780458496 ]
abeburmeister  tylerclemens  outlier  intervies  clothing  wearables  via:robinsloan  via:timmaly  2015  manufacturing  repetition  labor  sweatshops  glvo 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Why (Not) Wearables
"Students are watched. They are monitored. They are assessed. They are quantified.

Calls for a “quantified student” are connected in part to the “quantified self” movement, whose proponents use various technologies – apps, sensors, and wearables – to monitor aspects of their daily life (most commonly related to health and wellness, tracking things like caloric intake, sleep quality, and physical activity). The notion of the “quantified self” isn’t new – there are merely new devices for tracking, new ways to count “what counts.” “What counts” remains largely the same.

So even if a student gets to track for herself her own data there’s still, again, a very limited sense of “what counts,” based in part on the education system’s existing data demands and measurements. (This is one of the great ironies of disrupting “seat time”: we’re turning to other similarly flawed metrics.)"

"And so education technology opts to track more data. Rarely do we stop to ask to whom all this is being revealed or to what end. If both education and education technology view students as objects – objects to be tracked and monitored and shaped and surveilled – what role can we expect wearables to play?"
surveillance  audreywatters  2015  horizonreport  hype  policy  rfid  wearables  quantification  data  recording  video  googleglass  gps  students  schools  tracking  control  fitbit  edtech  technology  education  altschool 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Valley Of The Meatpuppets on Huffduffer
"The Valley of the Meatpuppets is an ethereal space where people, agents, thingbots, action heroes and big dogs coexist. In this new habitat, we are forming complex relationships with nebulous surveillance systems, machine intelligences and architectures of control, confronting questions about our freedom and capacity to act under invisible constraints."
anabjain  2014  dconstruct  dconstruct2014  bigdog  surveillance  machineintelligence  ai  artificialintelligence  technology  design  systesmthinking  individualism  privacy  future  wearable  wearables  nsa  complexity  googleglass  intenetofthings  control 
september 2014 by robertogreco
A DIY Pressure Suit for Near-Space Adventures | Popular Science
"In 2008, Cameron Smith, an anthropology professor at Portland State University in Oregon, decided to build a space suit. He designed the Mark I to protect himself on a high-altitude balloon ride, and so far it’s passed tests in a hypobaric chamber and underwater. Last year, independent space program Copenhagen Suborbitals offered him a potential path to the stratosphere (between about 30,000 and 165,000 feet above Earth). Smith will make a suit for the Danish group this summer, and they’ll help him build a helium balloon craft. Traditional pressure garments can cost upwards of $30,000. Smith’s materials set him back about $2,000, thanks to creative use of junk parts and spare kitchenware. “We’re trying to make it easier for people to get into space,” he says."
spacesuits  diy  2014  cameronsmith  space  spacetravel  wearables  materials  2008 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Coop Himmelb(l)au's Jammer Coat hides the wearer from Google
"Austrian architecture studio Coop Himmelb(l)au has created a quilted spotty cloak designed to protect the wearer from unwanted data collection."

[Also of interest: Martijn Van Strien's Dystopian Brutalist Outerwear is "a kind of trend forecast" https://vimeo.com/85146536 ]
coophimmelblau  datacollection  data  privacy  martijnvanstrien  wearable  wearables  clothing  google 
june 2014 by robertogreco
ying gao - designer
"2 interactive dresses, Super organza, photoluminescent thread, PVDF, electronic devices.

The project was inspired by the essay entitled "Esthétique de la disparition" (The aesthetic of disappearance), by Paul Virilio (1979). " Absence often occurs at breakfast time – the tea cup dropped, then spilled on the table being one of its most common consequences. Absence lasts but a few seconds, its beginning and end are sudden. However closed to outside impressions, the senses are awake. The return is as immediate as the departure, the suspended word or movement is picked up where it was left off as conscious time automatically reconstructs itself, thus becoming continuous and free of any apparent interruption. " The series comprising two (2) dresses, made of photoluminescent thread and imbedded eye tracking technology, is activated by spectators' gaze. A photograph is said to be “spoiled” by blinking eyes – here however, the concept of presence and of disappearance are questioned, as the experience of chiaroscuro (clarity/obscurity) is achieved through an unfixed gaze."
fashion  wearable  wearables  gaze  yinggao  presence  disappearance  chiaroscuro  clarity  obscurity  paulvirilio  absence  photoluminescence  vision 
june 2014 by robertogreco
RINGLY | Smart Jewelry and Accessories
"Introducing our first line of connected rings that let you put your phone away and your mind at ease. Ringly notifies you about the MESSAGES/EMAILS/PEOPLE/APPS/PEOPLE/PHONE CALLS that matter most. Ringly creates jewelry and accessories that connect to your phone and notify you about the things that matter most. Put your phone away and enjoy the moment."
jewelry  via:rachelbinx  wearables  haptics  notifications  ios  applications  2014  iphone  ringly 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Alexandra Lange on 3D printers versus the sewing machine
"In March, Slate Magazine's Seth Stevenson provided a public service when he borrowed a Solidoodle 4, pitched as the "accessible", "affordable" 3D printer, and attempted to print a bottle opener from Thingiverse. [http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2014/03/solidoodle_4_testing_the_home_3_d_printer.html ] Results, as they say, vary, but he ended up, after a series of phone calls and false starts, with "a functionless, semi-decorative piece of plastic."

The bumbling encounter with technology is a popular stratagem for Slate, but here it pointed directly to the reason we're not seeing a 3D printer in every den. I've seen those rhino heads, those dinosaur skulls. They do not fill me with delight, but remind me instead of the cheap toys my kids bring home from birthday parties and I throw away in the night. Why bother? How is printing your Triceratops at home more creative, more making, than buying one from a store? In either case, step one is scrolling through pages of online options, pointing and clicking in 2D.

Stevenson concluded that 3D printing was no place for amateurs, but for tinkerers. Those able to work under the hood of the printer: to understand the terms in the manual, to customise or create their own products for Thingiverse. For such tinkerers, neighbourhood printing hubs like Techshop, where subscribers can go to use physical or digital tools, make more sense. Designers taking advantage of 3D printers' capabilities for rapid prototyping and small-batch production have already started farming out the actual printing to places like Shapeways. When we stopped having to fax even weekly, we all got rid of those machines.

But then Stevenson took a turn toward the larger question of craft. He wrote, "Once upon a time, people purchased sewing patterns (like a program from Thingiverse) and yards of fabric (like filament) and they made their own clothes. I wasn't alive back then, but I'm pretty sure the process sucked."

I must be older than Stevenson, because my mother and grandmother sewed clothes for me. My mother, aunt and I have all sewed clothes and quilts for my children. They are not amateurishly constructed. We managed to make them while also holding down full time jobs. And judging from the extremely active online sewing community, the active trade in old machines and patterns on Ebay, and the ease with which one can locate a scan of a thirty-year-old sewing machine manual, the digital age has not turned sewing into a novelty, but spawned a revival of interest. In fact, if 3D printers are truly going to become a consumer good, they have a lot to learn from the sewing machine.

Because Stevenson snidely generalised from his own limited experience, he missed the instructive dialogue between craft and the machine age. Post-industrial sewing is not a freak but a respite. In Evgeny Morozov's recent New Yorker essay on the new makers, he quotes historian Jackson Lears' critique of the Arts & Crafts movement as "a revivifying hobby for the affluent." I'd say middle-class: (mostly) women who aren't seeing what they want, at a price they can afford, in the marketplace.

There’s an appetite for the "refashion," recycling an old dress or an adult T-shirt, and turning it into something new. Once upon a time, the use of flour sacks as fabric prompted grain-sellers to start offering their wares in flowered cotton bags. If some boutique grain company began doing that again, there would be a run on their product. Under the technology radar, there's a community of people sharing free patterns, knowledge and results, without the interpolation of brands, constantly obsolescent machinery, or the self-serving and myth-making rhetoric Morozov finds in Chris Anderson's Makers. There are the answers to the questions "Why bother?" and "How creative?" Rather than sewing being a cautionary tale, 3D printing can't become a consumer good until it learns a few lessons from why we sew now.

Number one: what's not available on the market. If you have a girl child in America, it is often difficult to find reasonably-priced, 100 per cent cotton clothing for her without ruffles, pink or purple, butterflies and hearts. If you go to the boy section, you run into an equally limiting set of colors, navy and army green, and an abundance of sports insignia. A full-skirted dress, a petite skirt, prints for the plus-sized – there are plenty of styles that are not novelties but, when not in fashion, disappear from stores. Online you can find patterns to make any of the above for less than $10, and fabric at the same price per yard. Online you can find step-by-step explanations, with photos, of how to make that pattern. That world of patterns is vast, constantly updated, and historically rich. Yes, sewing your own garment will take some time, but then you will have exactly what you want. That's why women bother.



Second lesson: recycling. Say my mother did actually sew something amateurishly. That's not the end of the story. A mis-printed jet-pack bunny is so much trash (unless I buy a second machine like a Filabot to remelt my filament). A mis-sewn seam can be ripped out and redone. An old dress can be refashioned into a new one. A favorite vintage piece can be copied. Sewing does not create more waste but, potentially, less, and the process of sewing is filled with opportunities for increasing one's skills and doing it over as well as doing it yourself. What are quilts, after all, but a clever way to use every last scrap of precious fabric?

So far, 3D printing's DIY aspects seem more akin to the "magic" of an ant farm, watching growth behind glass. Sewing lets the maker find their own materials, and get involved with every aspect of the process. 3D printing could do this, and there are classes, but even at the Makerbot showroom the primary interaction seemed to be ordering from Thingiverse. My local sewing shop has to teach more women to sew to survive; I don't see the printer makers coming to the same conclusion.

In addition, the machines themselves are constantly becoming junk. It's not unusual for new technology to change quickly. That's the fourth Solidoodle since 2011. Makerbot is on its fifth generation. It is early days for 3D printing, and the machines may eventually stabilise. But the rapid obsolescence suggests a lifecycle closer to that of a mobile phone than of a washing machine, which might also turn consumers off. The sewing machine was considered a lifetime purchase.

Last but not least, sharing. This is the one consumer area where 3D printing approaches sewing's success. From the Free Universal Construction Kit to full-body scans, the idea of open-source, free, and social-media enabled printing has been built-in to the 3D process. Showing off what you made is better when you created it, rather than printed it out. On the sewing blogs, the process pictures are half the fun, and most of the interest. What does it really teach your children when you can get doll house furniture on demand, except a desire for ever-more-instant gratification? For me to believe in 3D printers as a home machine, I'd have to see the digital file equivalent of women in their off-hours, making up patterns as they go along, sharing mistakes, dreaming better dreams. 3D printing feels bottled up, professionalised, too expensive for the experimentation of cut and sew and rip and sew again.

Stevenson wrote, "most people would much rather just get their clothes from a store — already assembled by people employing industrial-level efficiency and a wide variety of materials," and that's true. What Solidoodle and Makerbot and the rest should be looking at is the people who have seen everything in the store and found it wanting."
alexandralange  2014  sewing  3dprinting  makerbots  making  makers  repair  reuse  glvo  sharing  obsolescence  process  howwework  cv  waste  utility  technology  fabrication  alteration  thingiverse  purpose  usefulness  solidoodle  makerbot  recycling  agency  need  necessity  patterns  clothing  wearables  techshop  shapeways  sethstevenson  craft  lcproject  openstudioproject  homeec  repairing 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Ciphering personalised generative jewellery
"Ciphering is a personalised ring which physical form encodes numbers of your choosing.

The message becomes visible only when you take the ring off your finger and either shine light, or look through it in a correct angle.

Your input of four numbers and four letters are fed to an algorithm that generates the unique shape.

First the form is 3D printed in wax, and subsequently cast in silver, bronze or gold plated brass."

[via: http://www.architectradure.com/2014/03/27/personalised-generative-jewellery/ ]
rings  jewelry  wearables  cyphers 
april 2014 by robertogreco
In the Loop: Designing Conversations With Algorithms | superflux
"As algorithmic systems become more prevalent, I’ve begun to notice of a variety of emergent behaviors evolving to work around these constraints, to deal with the insufficiency of these black box systems. These behaviors point to a growing dissatisfaction with the predominant design principles, and imply a new posture towards our relationships with machines.

Adaptation

The first behavior is adaptation. These are situations where I bend to the system’s will. For example, adaptations to the shortcomings of voice UI systems — mispronouncing a friend’s name to get my phone to call them; overenunciating; or speaking in a different accent because of the cultural assumptions built into voice recognition. We see people contort their behavior to perform for the system so that it responds optimally. This is compliance, an acknowledgement that we understand how a system listens, even when it’s not doing what we expect. We know that it isn’t flexible or responsive enough, so we shape ourselves to it. If this is the way we move forward, do half of us end up with Google accents and the other half with Apple accents? How much of our culture ends up being an adaptation to systems we can’t communicate well with?

Negotiation

The second type of behavior we’re seeing is negotiation — strategies for engaging with a system to operate within it in more nuanced ways. One example of this is Ghostery, a browser extension that allows one to see what data is being tracked from one’s web browsing and limit it or shape it according to one’s desires. This represents a middle ground: a system that is intended to be opaque is being probed in order to see what it does and try and work with it better. In these negotiations, users force a system to be more visible and flexible so that they can better converse with it.

We also see this kind of probing of algorithms becoming a new and critical role in journalism, as newsrooms take it upon themselves to independently investigate systems through impulse response modeling and reverse engineering, whether it's looking at the words that search engines censor from their autocomplete suggestions, how online retailers dynamically target different prices to different users, or how political campaigns generate fundraising emails.

Antagonism

Third, rather than bending to the system or trying to better converse with it, some take an antagonistic stance: they break the system to assert their will. Adam Harvey’s CV Dazzle is one example of this approach, where people hack their hair and makeup in order to foil computer vision and opt out of participating in facial recognition systems. What’s interesting here is that, while the attitude here is antagonistic, it is also an extreme acknowledgement of a system’s power — understanding that one must alter one’s identity and appearance in order to simply exert free will in an interaction."



"Julian Oliver states this problem well, saying: “Our inability to describe and understand [technological infrastructure] reduces our critical reach, leaving us both disempowered and, quite often, vulnerable. Infrastructure must not be a ghost. Nor should we have only mythic imagination at our disposal in attempts to describe it. 'The Cloud' is a good example of a dangerous simplification at work, akin to a children's book.”

So, what I advocate is designing interactions that acknowledge the peer-like status these systems now have in our lives. Interactions where we don't shield ourselves from complexity but actively engage with it. And in order to engage with it, the conduits for those negotiations need to be accessible not only to experts and hackers but to the average user as well. We need to give our users more respect and provide them with more information so that they can start to have empowered dialogues with the pervasive systems around them.

This is obviously not a simple proposition, so we start with: what are the counterpart values? What’s the alternative to the black box, what’s the alternative to “it just works”? What design principles should we building into new interactions?

Transparency

The first is transparency. In order to be able to engage in a fruitful interaction with a system, I need to be able to understand something about its decision-making process. And I want to be clear that transparency doesn’t mean complete visibility, it doesn’t mean showing me every data packet sent or every decision tree.



Agency

The second principle here is agency, meaning that a system’s design should empower users to not only accomplish tasks, but should also convey a sense that they are in control of their participation with a system at any moment. And I want to be clear that agency is different from absolute and granular control.



Virtuosity

The last principle, virtuosity, is something that usually comes as a result of systems that support agency and transparency well. And when I say virtuosity, what I mean is the ability to use a technology expressively.

A technology allows for virtuosity when it contains affordances for all kinds of skilled techniques that can become deeply embedded into processes and cultures. It’s not just about being able to adapt something to one’s needs, but to “play” a system with skill and expressiveness."
superflux  anabjain  agency  algorithms  complexity  design  networks  wearables  christinaagapakis  paulgrahamraven  scottsmith  alexislloyd  2014  communication  adaptation  negotiation  antagonism  ghostery  julianoliver  transparency  virtuosity  visibility  systemsthinking  systems  expressiveness 
april 2014 by robertogreco
OpenKnit | open source knitting
"OpenKnit is an open-source, low cost (under 550€), digital fabrication tool that affords the user the opportunity to create his own bespoke clothing from digital files. Starting from the raw material, the yarn, and straight to its end use, a sweater for example, in about an hour. Designing and producing clothes digitally and wearing them can now happen in the very same place, rewarding the user with the ability to make decisions regarding creativity and responsibility."

[Video: https://vimeo.com/86987828 ]
openknit  knitten  looms  glvo  opensource  wearable  wearables  textiles  clothing 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Folk Couture - Jan 21 - Apr 23, 2014 at the American Folk Art Museum
"Fashion has always found inspiration in unpredictable sources: art, life, history—there are no boundaries. In this spirit, the American Folk Art Museum explores the relationship between inspiration and creation. Thirteen established and emerging designers have created original ensembles inspired by artwork in the museum’s collection."
art  folkart  glvo  wearable  wearables  design  clothing  2014  chadwickbell  fabiocosta  garygraham  catherinemalandrino  threeasfour  creaturesofthewind  bibhumohapartra  johnbartlett  ronaldus  shamask  michaelbastian  yeohleeteng  koosvanderakker  jeanyu 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Dog Collar Museum | Atlas Obscura
"Museum showcases canine neckwear spanning five centuries of doggie fashion and function"
dogs  wearables  museums  wearable  history 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Mary Huang :: portfolio
"With computational design there is the opportunity to not only create beautifully intricate forms, but to define a design according to its governing processes and user interactions. This project sought to mediate between the avant-garde and ready-to-wear, between individual users and a designer's vision. Could we use technology to democratize haute couture? Could we let people design their own dress, and still maintain a cohesive, recognizable design?

Computational couture captures this philosophy and applies it toward solving the persistent problem of standardized sizing in ready-to-wear. CONTINUUM is a concept for a web-based fashion label in which designs are user-generated using custom software and made to order to your personal measurements. Its seminal collection is a deconstruction of the classic little black dress. Software allows you to "draw" a dress and converts it into a 3D model, which is turned into a flat pattern that can be cut out of fabric and sewn into the dress. Not only can the physical dress be purchased through the label, but the cutting patterns are downloadable free of charge for those who would rather devote the time to making their own. With design encompassing a continuous user experience, we can inspire changing attitudes and behaviors of mass consumption."

[See also: http://www.continuumfashion.com/Ddress/ ]
processing  fashion  wearable  wearables  triangles  glvo  computing  maryhuang 
december 2013 by robertogreco
ELISA STROZYK
""Wooden Textiles" convey a new tactile experience. We are used to experience wood as a hard material; we know the feeling of walking across wooden floors, to touch a wooden tabletop or to feel the bark of a tree. But we usually don't experience a wooden surface which can be manipulated by touch.

"Wooden Textiles" is a material that is half wood-half textile, between hard and soft, challenging what can be expected from a material or category. It looks and smells familiar but feels strange, as it is able to move and form in unexpected ways.

The processes to transform wood into a flexible wooden surface is its deconstruction into pieces, which are then attached to a textile base. Depending on the geometry and size of the tiles each design shows a different behavior regarding flexibility and mobility. There are various possible applications, for example as floorings, curtains, drapes, plaids, upholstery or parts of furniture."

[See also: http://thisispaper.com/Elisa-Strozyk-Wooden-Textiles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmf7OK6fKck

and

http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/lamps.html
http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/woodenrug.html
http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/woodencarpet.html ]
wood  fabric  textiles  elisstrozyc  glvo  foldable  wearables  wearable  design  triangles 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Entfaltung: Collapsible Fashion | strictlypaper
"Enfaltung, which in german harbors many meanings: unfold, expand or develop, is the basis of this Master’s thesis project created by german native Jule Waible for her Design Products program at the Royal College of Art. This series features a yellow dress that transformes its shape dependent upon the movement of the body, a green expandable accordion styled bag and an orange umbrella which all use a style referred to as origami tessellation. It is exactly that in which it describes along with the magic of the source of her inspiration, Mary Poppin’s enchanted bag. “Collapsible structures reflect how our world is constantly changing,” she writes. “My response is to use folding as part of my design process.”"

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/70925798
https://vimeo.com/julewaibel
https://vimeo.com/68908713
https://vimeo.com/68951582
https://vimeo.com/80056324 ]

[See also: http://www.core77.com/blog/fashion_design/below_the_fold_jule_waibels_mary_poppins-inspired_accordion-like_entfaltung_collection_25220.asp and
http://www.dezeen.com/2013/07/24/entfaltung-fashion-by-jule-waibel/ ]
fashion  wearable  folding  fabric  textiles  origami  glvo  wearables  design  triangles 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Studio XO
"STUDIO XO OPERATES AT THE INTERSECTION OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, FASHION & MUSIC.

Seamlessly integrating new technologies & special effects with innovative fashion design to create digital couture experiences.

We develop technologies & products that capture intimate physiological data, revealing emotional interactions."
science  technoilogy  music  fashion  specialeffects  physiology  technology  materials  wearable  studioxo  emotions  wearables 
december 2013 by robertogreco
It's Nice That : Playfulness abounds in dazzling Dutch designer Femke Agema's fashions
"I came across Dutch fashion designer Femke Agema flicking through an in-flight magazine on the way back from a recent trip to Amsterdam; one of the most enjoyable pre-take-off distractions I can remember. Femke’s work marries technical skill with some fantastical ideas as proved by her two most recent collections. For Elders, her 2013 spring/summer range, she took inspiration from our primordial emotional response to the onset of spring, “the simple joy we feel in being let loose into the wild to play in an environment overflowing with possibilities.”

It followed on neatly from her last collection of 2012, which was titled Nigliktok after the inuit word for “cold,” created as she says “for the inevitable snowpocalypse.” Playful and consistently rewarding, Femke’s talent ensures I will never again toss another airline magazine aside."

[See also: http://femkeagema.nl/ ]
dashion  design  femkeagema  wearable  costumes  glvo  wearables 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Cyberpunk ponchos let you hide in the glitched-out future | The Verge
"Do you want to live through the digital apocalypse in style? Timefly has put together a series of futuristic ponchos that place heavily digital designs onto physical canvases. They're modern camouflage for a cyberpunk punk world — one in which geometric patterns and eerily smooth CG could help you to blend into a metropolis of blinking TVs and glitched out displays. Timefly launched late last year and has been adding works by different digital artists ever since. If you're daring enough to be at this year's Def Con, you'll be able to catch live, tripped-out visuals by Timefly at the Codame party this Saturday night — for everyone else, a spread of its entire fashion line is below."
wearable  ponchos  glvo  glitchart  textles  2013  camouflage  wearables 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Stealth Wear | Adam Harvey
"Statement

Building off previous work with CV Dazzle, camouflage from face detection, Stealth Wear continues to explore the aesthetics of privacy and the potential for fashion to challenge authoritarian surveillance.

Presented by Primitive at Tank Magazine are a suite of new designs, made in collaboration with NYC fashion designer Johanna Bloomfield, that tackle some of the most pressing and sophisticated forms of surveillance today. The ready-to-wear countersurveillance solutions include a series of ‘Anti-Drone’ garments and the Off Pocket, an anti-phone accessory that allows you to instantly zero out your phone’s signal.

Collectively, Stealth Wear is a vision for fashion that addresses the rise of surveillance, the power of those who surveil, and the growing need to exert control over what we are slowly losing, our privacy.

In Privacy We Trust,

Adam Harvey
In collaboration with Johanna Bloomfield / www.johannesfaktotum.com
Presented by Primitive London / http://www.primitivelondon.co.uk/
Hosted by TANK Magazine / http://tankmagazine.com/ "
drones  fashion  privacy  surveillance  camouflage  adamharvey  clothing  wearable  cv  dazzle  johannabloomfield  primitivelondon  stealthwear  stealth  razzledazzle  wearables 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Mass + Text
Text from the about page: http://massandtext.tumblr.com/post/51958922935/what-is-mass-text ]

"Mass + Text wants to understand the relationship between language (analogue and digital signals), physical objects, and the communities they anchor. I’m curious about how we translate thought into form, and back again.

Mass + Text happened because I like words, and I like the idea that objects are a byproduct of their cultural context. I think there’s an interesting back and forth between said things and made things, and this is an attempt to think-through-writing till I make some sense of it.

I’m not quite sure what I’m doing, but I’m going to scratch this itch anyway. What I do know is that the emergence of ubiquitous computing is going to bring together language and objects in weird and interesting ways, with implications for architecture, media, journalism, consumer technology, and fashion. This is my attempt to begin to make some sense of it.

***

The ease with which we’re able to summon and dismiss texts on glowing rectangles makes us forget that language isn’t weightless. The ways in which we call out and respond to each other are deeply anchored within physical things. Heavy things. We make meaning by spilling oceans of ink, crushing mountains of herbs and minerals into pigments, and by sliding slabs of quivering muscle against each other.

And even when we summon an idea from the depths of cyberspace,and it leaps onto our screens, that idea is bound to this plane by physical objects. Language exists within at least three dimensions.

So if language can shape mass (indeed, if language is mass), what will new forms of communication mean for the things we build, and the way we build? Can we incorporate content into spaces and objects in ways that go beyond merely turning them into display screens? How does this communication influence our relationships with our tools?

With ourselves?

***

Areas of interest:

• the evolution of media and journalism: what does it mean that ESPN is interested in the data being harvested from wearable tech such as the Jawbone UP? If the medium is the message, how will media companies design for wearable computing devices that have very little room for display screens?

• internet-connected devices: the coming wave of “smart" devices offers an opportunity to rethink everything from how these objects look to what they do. How do you design analog/digital interfaces that take into account qualities of mass such as weight, texture and temperature?

• architecture: we can speak to our spaces, and our spaces can speak back (through location-based Foursquare tips, geo-triggered alerts, changing room temperature to suit our personal profile, etc.). The built form is how we interface with the city, and changes to that form have implications for everything from our ideas about privacy, community, and to discussions about who has the right to the city.

• fashion: we know clothing can be language, but the use cases of clothing-as-tool have been surprisingly few, i.e. clothing can keep us warm, and they offer some measure of protection from weapons, but that’s about it. How can we make clothing even more useful? And how will those utilitarian scripts be reflected in aesthetics?

• histories of communication: everywhere mass intersects with text, an idea finds its way into our world, be it when a finger strikes against a keyboard, or when someone’s vocal chords rub together. I want to understand that threshold, liminal space where a concept is impregnated within an object, and given form."
text  communication  objects  emmanuelquartey  language  digital  communities  community  blogs  ubicomp  internetofthings  networkedobjects  senses  media  journalism  wearable  technology  jawbone  architecture  design  fashion  history  interfaces  ux  mobile  smartdevices  analog  wearables  iot 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Parangolés – Wikipédia
"Os Parangolés, do artista brasileiro Hélio Oiticica, é um conjunto de obras que nasceu, segundo o próprio artista, de "uma necessidade vital de desintelectualização, de desinibição intelectual, da necessidade de uma livre expressão"."

[See also http://www.digestivocultural.com/colunistas/coluna.asp?codigo=856&titulo=Parangole:_anti-obra_de_Helio_Oiticica and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zTJDCugNB4 and
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/17/arts/design/17oiti.html?pagewanted=all and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A9lio_Oiticica ]

"He also created works called Parangolés which consisted layers of fabric, plastic and matting intended to be worn like costumes but experienced as mobile sculptures. The first parangolés experiences were made together with dancers from the Mangueira Samba school, where Oiticica was also a participant."
heeliooiticica  paranolés  art  ncmideas  glvo  wearables  wearable  tropicália  brasil  brazil  gruponeoconcreto  dance  fabric  textiles  artists  costumes  sculpture  openstudioproject 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Stealth Wear Aims to Make a Tech Statement - NYTimes.com
"Adam Harvey, an artist and design professor at the School of Visual Arts and an early creator of stealth wear, acknowledges that countersurveillance clothing sounds like something out of a William Gibson novel.

“The science-fiction part has become a reality,” he said, “and there’s a growing need for products that offer privacy.”

Mr. Harvey exhibited a number of his stealth-wear designs and prototypes in an art show this year in London. His work includes a series of hoodies and cloaks that use reflective, metallic fabric — like the kind used in protective gear for firefighters — that he has repurposed to  reduce a person’s thermal footprint. In theory, this limits one’s visibility to aerial surveillance vehicles employing heat-imaging cameras to track people on the ground.

He also developed a purse with extra-bright LEDs that can be activated when someone is taking unwanted pictures; the effect is to reduce an intrusive photograph to a washed-out blur. In addition, he created a guide for hairstyling and makeup application that might keep a camera from recognizing the person beneath the elaborate get-up. The technique is called CV Dazzle — a riff on “computer vision” and “dazzle,” a type of camouflage used during World War II to make it hard to detect the size and shape of warships.

Mr. Harvey isn’t the only one working on such products. …"
surveillance  countersurveillance  uniformproject  razzledazzle  light  facerecognition  clothing  wearables  wearable  privacy  2013  adamharvey  googleglass  drones  beckstern  toddblatt  joannemcneil  janchipchase  camouflage  jennawortham  fashion  technology  fabric  dazzle 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Bundlr - Smart Objects and the Internet of Things
"A collection of 'smart objects' that contain sensors and microprocessors to capture aspects of selfhood and the body and are part of the Internet of Things."
via:anne  smartobjects  internetofthings  selfhood  body  deborahlupton  wearable  wearables  iot  bodies 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Body-Technology Interfaces | Sternlab
"Laptop Compubody Sock for privacy, warmth, and concentration in public spaces

Learn to make your own on Instructables.

See more pictures on Flickr.

Cell Phone Ski Mask

Ski Mask for Eating a Sandwich

Keyboard Interface for Computer Programming"
compubody  wearables  knitting  glvo  computing  computers  mobile  phones  typing  eating  sandwiches  privacy  warmth  gaming  craft  design  technology  via:meetar  chatroulette  wearable 
june 2013 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Spacesuit: An Interview with Nicholas de Monchaux
"I was looking for a way to discuss the essential lessons of complexity and emergence—which, even in 2003, were pretty unfamiliar words in the context of design—and I hit upon this research on the spacesuit as the one thing I’d done that could encapsulate the potential lessons of those ideas, both for scientists and for designers. The book really was a melding of these two things."

"But then the actual spacesuit—this 21-layered messy assemblage made by a bra company, using hand-stitched couture techniques—is kind of an anti-hero. It’s much more embarrassing, of course—it’s made by people who make women’s underwear—but, then, it’s also much more urbane. It’s a complex, multilayered assemblage that actually recapitulates the messy logic of our own bodies, rather than present us with the singular ideal of a cyborg or the hard, one-piece, military-industrial suits against which the Playtex suit was always competing.

The spacesuit, in the end, is an object that crystallizes a lot of ideas about who we are and what the nature of the human body may be—but, then, crucially, it’s also an object in which many centuries of ideas about the relationship of our bodies to technology are reflected."

"The same individuals and organizations who were presuming to engineer the internal climate of the body and create the figure of the cyborg were the same institutions who, in the same context of the 1960s, were proposing major efforts in climate-modification.

Embedded in both of those ideas is the notion that we can reduce a complex, emergent system—whether it’s the body or the planet or something closer to the scale of the city—to a series of cybernetically inflected inputs, outputs, and controls. As Edward Teller remarked in the context of his own climate-engineering proposals, “to give the earth a thermostat.”"

"most attempts to cybernetically optimize urban systems were spectacular failures, from which very few lessons seem to have been learned"

"architecture can be informed by technology and, at the same time, avoid what I view as the dead-end of an algorithmically inflected formalism from which many of the, to my mind, less convincing examples of contemporary practice have emerged"

"connections…between the early writing of Jane Jacobs…and the early research done in the 1950s and 60s on complexity and emergence under the aegis of the Rockefeller Foundation"

"Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt—who have gone a long way in showing that, not only should cities be viewed through the analogical lens of complex natural systems, but, in fact, some of the mathematics—in particular, to do with scaling laws, the consumption of resources, and the production of innovation by cities—proves itself far more susceptible to analyses that have come out of biology than, say, conventional economics."
militaryindustrialcomplex  tools  cad  gis  luisbettencourt  janejacobs  meatropolis  manhattan  meat  property  fakestates  alancolquhoun  lizdiller  cyberneticurbanism  glenswanson  parametricarchitecture  parametricurbanism  interstitialspaces  urbanism  urban  bernardshriever  simonramo  neilsheehan  jayforrester  housing  hud  huberthumphrey  vitruvius  naca  smartcities  nyc  joeflood  husseinchalayan  cushicle  michaelwebb  spacerace  buildings  scuba  diving  1960s  fantasticvoyage  adromedastrain  quarantine  systemsthinking  matta-clark  edwardteller  climatecontrol  earth  exploration  spacetravel  terraforming  humanbody  bodies  cyborgs  travel  mongolfier  wileypost  management  planning  robertmoses  cybernetics  materials  fabric  2003  stewartbrand  jamescrick  apollo  complexitytheory  complexity  studioone  geoffreywest  cities  research  clothing  glvo  wearables  christiandior  playtex  interviews  technology  history  design  science  fashion  nasa  books  spacesuits  architecture  space  bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  2012  nicholasdemonchaux  wearable  elizabethdiller  interstitial  bod  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Franz Erhard Walther: Work as Action - artreview.com
"Franz Erhard Walther counts among those artists who, in the 1960s, sought to undermine the authorial role of the artist in favour of a more democratic aesthetic dependent on the interaction of viewer and object. Others with similar ideas whose work has entered the curatorial limelight of late include Charlotte Posenenske, featured in the last Documenta and subject of a one-person show this summer at Artists Space here in New York. Unlike Posenenske ¬– who wished to divorce the hand from artmaking in favour of mechanised labour – Walther seems to take his cue from Leonardo’s Vitruvian Man: simple and individual acts such as folding and lying, leaning and stepping are either the source of his often minimal works or the means by which individual viewers may interact with them."

[See also: http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/events/16187 AND http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1294 ]
canvas  wearables  johnbock  martinkippenberger  santiagosierra  josephbeuys  firstworkset  workasaction  action  charlotteposenske  collaborative  participatory  1967  franzerhardwalther  democratic  interactive  glvo  art  wearable  ncm  participatoryart  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
9 | Ew! A Pulsating Dress Made Of Realistic Fake Skin [NSFW] | Co.Design: business + innovation + design
"You know how some people’s temples pulse wildly when they’re mad or spooked or nervous? That’s more or less the idea behind Like Living Organisms, by Dutch fashion designers Cor Baauw and Leonie Baauw of Local Androids. A futuristic neckpiece (or dress, depending on whether you think boob coverage is a requirement for the latter), it’s made of freakishly life-like fake skin and has “veins” that beat visibly in the company of other people, then deflate when touched as a “sign of trust,” the designers say.

How it works: The garment comes equipped with two sensors and air pumps. When the wearer approaches another person, one sensor forces air to flow through the veins, simulating a pulse. A second sensor, which responds to touch, then flattens the veins."
fabric  textiles  clothing  technosensual  livingorganisms  leoniebaauw  corbaauw  garments  glvo  localandroids  wearables  fashion  wearable 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life - Thoughts on Project Glass making Smartphones Obsolete
"it is quite clear that in our lifetime there will be the ability to put together scenarios that would have seemed far fetched for science fiction just a few years ago. It will one day be possible to look up the Facebook profile or future equivalent of anyone you meet at a bar, business meeting or on the street without the person being none the wiser simply by looking at them. Most of the technology to do this already exists, it just isn’t in a portable form factor. That is just one scenario that not only will be possible but will be commonplace with products like Project Glass in the future." "I have to wonder what Apple thinks of all of this. When I look at [Google Glass] … I see a clunky and obtrusive piece of headgear that I can imagine makes Jonathan Ive roll his eyes and think he could do much better. Given Apple’s mantra is “If you don’t cannibalize yourself, someone else will” I expect this space to be very interesting over the next ten years."
Dare_Obasanjo  Google_Glass  Apple  design  future  wearables  2012  via:Preoccupations  wearable 
july 2012 by robertogreco
COMPANY
"COMPANY IS AAMU SONG & JOHAN OLIN. COMPANY work as artists, designers, and producers, running their own shop in Helsinki."

[See also: http://com-pa-ny.com/products/tanssipage.html AND http://com-pa-ny.com/at_moment.html AND http://www.wowsan.com/?p=872 AND http://www.salakauppa.fi/ ]
architecture  clothing  wearables  glvo  finland  johanolin  aamusong  art  helsinki  fashion  design  wearable 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Salakauppa (Secret Shop)
"Salakauppa (Secret shop) is Company's little dream come true in the center of Helsinki. All products in Salakauppa are designed by Aamu Song & Johan Olin of Company and are manufactured by our dearest factory friends in Finland, Belgium and Korea. For us design means celebrating the brilliant traditional skills and genuine materials. Welcome."

[See also: http://com-pa-ny.com/ ]
wearables  clothing  design  belgium  korea  johanolin  aamusong  salakauppa  finland  helsinki  wearable 
february 2012 by robertogreco
doug johnston: Sash Cord Studies
"These vesels, masks and sculptures utilize an old crafting technique in which rope or cord is coiled and stitched to forms bowls and baskets. The technique is itself based on the ancient method of making ceramic coiled pots as well as coiled basketry. The method explores ways of transforming a linear material into three-dimensional objects, an interest I have also studied in other materials such as yarn or plastic tubing. I also see the process as a form of analog 3D printing/prototyping performed by a sewing machine and with much less precision. In this way the "3D file" is in my head as I begin each piece and its formation happens by making certain adjustments to the work w"hile sewing. The process has its own limitations, largely determined by the sewing machine, and each piece takes on deformations and glitches that give it unique personality.

The studies use the raw 100% cotton braided cord, often called sash cord, and colored sewing thread…"
wearables  vessels  brooklyn  nyc  glvo  textiles  design  art  dougjohnston  wearable 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Hallowgreen | Art21 Blog
"While we often think of contemporary art and how our older students might respond to it, we are always pleased that our very youngest students are so enthusiastic about it, too. Nick Cave is one reason why.

Cave, chair of the Department of Fashion Design at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, brings together his interests in fashion, performance and sculpture while making reference to African ceremonial costumes. Watch a video of Nick Cave, produced by United States Artists:"
nickcave  performance  performanceart  sewing  costumes  classideas  tcsnmy  art  fashion  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  design  glvo  wearable  textiles  sound  dance  sculpture  soundsuits  fabric  crossdisciplinary  wearables  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Nick Cave Lecture at Fowler Museum, Jan. 9, 2010 on Vimeo
"A lecture presentation by Nick Cave about his signature Soundsuits is followed by a conversation between Nick Cave and the Fowler Museum's director Marla C. Berns about the global resonances in the artist's work.

This event was organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Nick Cave: Meet Me At The Center Of The Earth" which is on view at the Fowler Museum at UCLA January 10 - May 30, 2010."
costumes  music  masks  nickcave  art  performance  fowlermuseum  ucla  lectures  conversations  2010  textiles  wearable  performanceart  sewing  sound  soundsuits  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  artists  expression  design  dance  sculpture  fabric  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  wearables  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago: Profiles: Nick Cave
"My work, clothing & fiber-based sculptures, collages, installations, & performances, explore use of textiles & clothing as conceptual modes of expression & pose fundamental questions about human condition in social & political realm…

I believe that what happens in my studio & living life as an artist are the single most important things I bring to the classroom. Artists must design their own pathways, work through plateaus in their work & understand that they will find themselves humbled by the very process of art-making.

I encourage my students to build their work w/ conviction, come face-to-face w/ truth of what they are attempting to create, & be open to experimentation.

I have been lucky to have been mentored by talented artists who taught me to challenge myself & build level of confidence & trust in my creative judgment…I hope to provide my students w/ knowledge that their art making holds the possibility for acting as a vehicle for change on a larger, global scale."
nickcave  art  performance  textiles  classideas  performanceart  design  collage  assemblage  life  living  teaching  education  learning  artists  glvo  cv  sound  interactive  sculpture  installation  expression  humancondition  society  politics  sensemaking  experimentation  doing  making  understanding  self  confidence  trust  wearable  fabric  sewing  change  costumes  dance  soundsuits  tcsnmy  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  pedagogy  howwework  wearables  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Art - Nick Cave, Dreaming the Clothing Electric, at the Yerba Buena Center - NYTimes.com
"Over the last decade Mr. Cave has become known for making colorful, extravagant sculptures with this kind of double life: they can stand alone in galleries as visually compelling art objects, or they can be worn by dancers as vehicles for sound and movement. He calls them Soundsuits.

Some Soundsuits, like a bouquet of metal toys and tops perched on top of a bodysuit made of crocheted hot pads, make a clanking commotion. Others, like the Soundsuits made of human hair (bought already dyed from a wholesaler in New York), tend to fall in the quiet, whispery range. All come to life in performance.

Yerba Buena’s director, Kenneth Foster, who described his institution as “deeply multidisciplinary,” called Mr. Cave a natural choice for the center for that reason. “So many visual artists cross over in a way that the performance world would be aghast at,” he said. “Nick is one of the rare artists as strong in his secondary field as he is in his home art form.”"
nickcave  design  performanceart  performance  dance  art  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  costumes  sound  soundsuits  2009  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  fabric  sewing  textiles  wearable  sculpture  wearables  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Soundsuits of Nick Cave: Contemporary Art or Material Culture? : Bad at Sports
"My own lack of familiarity  with Cave’s work makes me wonder, though: Why is Cave’s show traveling to the Fowler Museum, which is a museum of cultural history, and not an art museum that has an equally strong ability to support and exhibit interdisciplinary art of this nature, like, say, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) or even UCLA’s “other” arts institution, the white-hot Hammer Museum*?"
art  fashion  costumes  design  sound  nickcave  fowlermuseum  ucla  2009  classification  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  wearable  performanceart  performance  sewing  soundsuits  dance  sculpture  fabric  wearables  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Playbuttton convierte a las chapitas en reproductores de MP3 - FayerWayer
"Playbutton es un reproductor de MP3 distinto. Mientras la mayoría de los reproductores te prometen millones de canciones en un pequeño dispositivo con horas y horas de batería, Playbutton es mucho más simple: un disco, en una sola chapita."
mp3  music  gadgets  buttons  edg  srg  glvo  wearable  mp3players  wearables  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Element S(urvival): A Coat-and-Sleeping-Bag-in-One for the Homeless | Design for Good | Big Think
"Homelessness is perhaps the most disconcerting reminder of the staggering gap between the rich and the poor in some of the world's wealthiest nations. In Detroit alone, more than 18,000 people are homeless – a social circumstance most grueling over the cold winter months. To address the issue, 21-year-old Detroit design student Veronika Scott has developed a clever multifunctional garment – Element S(urvival), an inexpensive but highly insulated winter coat that quickly and easily transforms into a sleeping bag."
neo-nomads  design  sleepingbags  clothing  wearable  nomads  homeless  homelessness  detroit  glvo  wearables  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Raglan sleeve - Wikipedia [Formerly know to me as "the type of sleeve that I prefer."]
"A raglan sleeve is a type of sleeve whose distinguishing characteristic is to extend in one piece fully to the collar, leaving a diagonal seam from underarm to collarbone. It is popular in sports- and exercise wear, and named after the 1st Baron Raglan, probably because it was designed to fit his coat for the arm lost in the Battle of Waterloo. These sleeves are often shorter, usually half- or three quarter-length. A "Raglan Tee" might also be called a "baseball shirt.""
clothing  glvo  wearable  sleeves  raglansleeves  preferences  cv  wearables  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
tine de ruysser: wearable metal origami
"belgian designer tine de ruysser focused on the creation of wearable metal origami for her PhD at the royal college of art in london. one of the products she developed for her project was this shoulder cape made from copper and polyester combined in a geometric folding pattern. the unique geometry of the cape allows it to conform to the wearer’s body, fitting like a fabric rather than a solid metal. the materials consist of small squares and triangular forms made from sheet<br />
copper, connected together in a repeating pattern using the polyester. the shape of the metal gives the material its malleability. de ruysser created a number of other objects for her project including skirts, bracelets and bags." [As a wearable, I’m not convinced, but I would love to see something like this used to build flexible enclosures.]
copper  wearable  metal  glvo  flexible  folding  geometry  wearables  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Bum flap - Wikipedia
"The bum or butt flap is a piece of removable material that hangs from the waist to cover the rear end. The flap is of ambiguous origin, but probably originally intended to reduce abrasive wear to pants. In homelessness the surface of pavement can rapidly wear the seat of pants and flaps act as replaceable buffer material. Bum flaps are often worn as a superfluous fashion statement, usually emblazoned with punk iconography.

The typical anti-consumer attitudes of flap wearers make them nearly exclusively handmade. Flaps are usually constructed by the wearer with the most suitable material on hand, often the canvas or denim of discarded clothing. Water resistant and thermally insulating flaps are desirable for long distance rail travel and camping. Flaps may be stitched to the underlying garment or suspended from the belt."

[via: http://twitter.com/agpublic/status/23170061412 ]
bumflap  clothing  homeless  fabric  tools  seating  wearable  buttflap  fashion  punk  wearables  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Nervous System
"Nervous System creates experimental jewelry, combining nontraditional materials like silicone rubber and stainless steel with rapid prototyping methods. We find inspiration in complex patterns generated by computation and nature."
accessories  handmade  rapidprototyping  processing  patterns  design  computation  generative  fabrication  math  wearable  shopping  nervoussystem  glvo  complexity  nature  biomimicry  coding  biomimetics  jewelry  wearables  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
alex dodge: generative
"the interests of new york-based artist alex dodge extends into the relationships between humanity, technology, art and design, in which he has designed a collection of garments of concept prototypes developed in collaboration with brooklyn-based tech start-up generative. each of the works address the notion of passive interfacing; engaging the human body through acquiescent means. some of the pieces seem to be influenced by science fiction while others are more accessibly clear-cut. the prototypes developed by dodge himself, range in their levels of functionality, but are presented here as art objects and design objects on equal standing. while dodge may focus on creating mass-manufacturable products, envisioning that they bring people one step closer to a utopian ideal, dodge's objects fetishize the technological imperative, or the inevitable hybridization of man and machine, as something worthy of appreciation in itself."
alexdodge  art  design  dreams  sleep  hybridization  technology  technologicalimperative  glvo  embedded  wearable  humanity  generative  wearables 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Style Icon: Cayce Pollard from William Gibson's "Pattern Recognition" ---> NOGOODFORME.COM
"You'd think such an allergy to brands would put a cramp in a girl's style, but here's the other rub: Cayce has style in spades. She may be allergic to fashion, but she still loves clothes. You can tell, because the novel talks about her clothes a lot. (And she has a girly side: she enjoys spa treatments and does Pilates, for God's sake!) Her limitations with clothing actually work to give her a strong look, which the book encapsulates best:"
fashion  fiction  books  marketing  williamgibson  style  glvo  srg  patternrecognition  cosplay  clothing  wearable  wearables 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Design For The Displaced: Using Textiles To Create A Home - Core77
The Displaced Project by Raneen Nosh, of Citizen Designer, questions the emotional impact of displacement and explores the meaning of home for those who have been affected by damaging events such as natural disasters or political conflict. Nosh, a recent graduate from Emily Carr University of Art + Design, created a textile-based object that is "designed to suit the nomadic needs of a displaced person, while also serving to recreate a sense of domestic comfort to preserve personal and cultural memory."
neo-nomads  nomads  textiles  clothing  wearable  shelter  housing  design  wearables 
february 2010 by robertogreco
yarel yair: sahara hat
"sahara hats are a popular must have for sun protection during travel adventures. unlike conventional travel hats, this head gear designed by yarel yair is equipped with two small, quiet electric fans to support the ventilation of air. the form of the hat consists of a wide brim to additionally shield against the sun's harmful rays."
glvo  travel  clothing  design  electronics  gadgets  sun  wearable  wearables 
january 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - GOOD: Animal Superpowers
"Artists Kenichi Okada and Chris Woebken have created three devices designed to give children a chance to experience heightened animal senses. For example, their Bird Device consists of a GPS that vibrates when oriented towards home, simulating the instincts of migratory fowl."
via:javierarbona  glvo  animals  electronics  senses  sight  ants  giraffes  birds  nature  interaction  design  wearable  wearables 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Welcome to EduWear » What’s EduWear?
"EduWear aims at contributing to the reduction of inhibiting factors by employing an approach rooted both in education and in ICT development. The objective is to develop an educational low-cost construction kit for wearable and tangible interfaces.

Understanding ICT and being able to use them competently and confidently, and possibly to actively shape their development are competences that are crucial for societal participation in the information society. Structural barriers and mechanisms of marginalisation as well as high cost of educational ICT materials inhibit the development of such competencies."

[via: http://blog.neo-nomad.net/eduwear/1156/ ]
design  wearable  children  tcsnmy  classideas  arduino  hardware  electronics  software  textiles  glvo  edg  srg  education  wearables 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Nick Cave’s Soundsuits : Bad at Sports
"Nick Cave’s Soundsuits are fabulous creations made of thrift store finds, twigs, plastic bags, discarded thcotchkes, and just about anything else that strikes his fancy. Children loved seeing his work and guessing the materials they were made from, and seeing a video presentation of people inhabiting them. They enjoyed learning about his process, too. Often, Cave’s Soundsuits are assembled by a multigenerational, multicultural group of volunteers in his Chicago neighborhood.”

[see also: http://blog.art21.org/2008/10/29/hallowgreen/ ]
nickcave  children  art  glvo  wearable  via:regine  sound  dance  performance  recycling  costumes  design  sculpture  soundsuits  sewing  classideas  tcsnmy  fabric  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  performanceart  wearables 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Mediamatic - A jacket to solve your social awkwardness, a bag to solve your loneliness - An overview of the projects from the Hybrid Wearables Workshop
"I do not need my laptop to be merged with my overcoat. I do not want to receive email on a tiny screen mounted on my eyeglasses. I do not have enough attention to distribute to real and virtual life at once. Nevertheless, applications like these are some of the first which come to mind when one mentions wearable computing. Instead, what if your shirt would hug you every now at then? What if your bag would warn you about forgetting your keys? What if your socks explained how to give a fantastic foot massage?"
design  technology  wearable  ubicomp  posthuman  innovation  glvo  awkwardness  wearables 
november 2008 by robertogreco
3D body scans used to create 2D sewing patterns - Core77
"The T-shirt Issue is an experimental project by Berlin designer's Mashallah Design and Linda Kostowski who converted the 3D files of 3 digitally scanned bodies into simple polygon forms that were used to generate unique 2D patterns for the garments."
glvo  clothing  wearable  sewing  fashion  wearables 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Review: 'Fashioning Technology' Embraces the Fusion of Craft & Tech | Geekdad from Wired.com
"A new book from O'Reilly is positioned on the leading edge of the DIY movement: Crafters turned hardware hackers. (Think knitting plus LEDs and microchips.)
books  wearable  craft  glvo  arduino  knitting  technology  art  wearables 
august 2008 by robertogreco
XBee LilyPad at Rob Faludi
"When the board files are done, they’ll be posted publicly on my site...A couple of my Sociable Objects students working on socially shape-shifting skirts. Hopefully the new XBee LilyPad will enable their creations."
xbee  wearable  arduino  processing  lilypad  edg  wearables 
july 2008 by robertogreco
ISEA 2008 - The Juried exhibition - we make money not art
"Finally, We Hear One Another is a work by Kelly Jaclynn Andres that enables people to experience each other's soundscapes. Collaborating with the Mixed Reality Lab, Kelly made bonnet's fitted with a speaker and an extra 'ear' - a cone at the back of the
wmmna  soundscapes  sound  mixedreality  wearable  installation  glvo  games  wearables 
july 2008 by robertogreco
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