robertogreco + wcydwt   31

How Culture Shapes Our Senses - NYTimes.com
"FLORENCE, Italy — WE think of our senses as hard-wired gateways to the world. Many years ago the social psychologist Daryl J. Bem described the knowledge we gain from our senses as “zero-order beliefs,” so taken for granted that we do not even notice them as beliefs. The sky is blue. The fan hums. Ice is cold. That’s the nature of reality, and it seems peculiar that different people with their senses intact would experience it subjectively.

Yet they do. In recent years anthropologists have begun to point out that sensory perception is culturally specific. “Sensory perception,” Constance Classen, the author of “The Deepest Sense: A Cultural History of Touch,” says, “is a cultural as well as physical act.” It’s a controversial claim made famous by Marshall McLuhan’s insistence that nonliterate societies were governed by spoken words and sound, while literate societies experienced words visually and so were dominated by sight. Few anthropologists would accept that straightforwardly today. But more and more are willing to argue that sensory perception is as much about the cultural training of attention as it is about biological capacity.

Now they have some quantitative evidence to support the point. Recently, a team of anthropologists and psychologists at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and Radboud University, both in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, set out to discover how language and culture affected sensory awareness. Under the leadership of Asifa Majid and Stephen C. Levinson, they made up a kit of systematic stimuli for the traditional five senses: for sight, color chips and geometric forms; for hearing, pitch, amplitude and rhythm variations; for smell, a set of scratch-and-sniff cards; and so forth. They took these kits to over 20 cultural groups around the world. Their results upend some of our basic assumptions.

For example, it’s fairly common, in scientific literature, to find the view that “humans are astonishingly bad at odor identification and naming,” as a recent review of 30 years of experiments concluded. When ordinary people are presented with the smell of ordinary substances (coffee, peanut butter, chocolate), they correctly identify about half of them. That’s why we think of scent as a trigger for personal memory — leading to the recall of something specific, particular, uniquely our own.

It turns out that the subjects of those 30 years of experiments were mostly English-speaking. Indeed, English speakers find it easy to identify the common color in milk and jasmine flowers (“white”) but not the common scent in, say, bat droppings and the leaf of ginger root. When the research team presented what should have been familiar scents to Americans — cinnamon, turpentine, lemon, rose and so forth — they were terrible at naming them. Americans, they wrote, said things like this when presented with the cinnamon scratch-and-sniff card: “I don’t know how to say that, sweet, yeah; I have tasted that gum like Big Red or something tastes like, what do I want to say? I can’t get the word. Jesus it’s like that gum smell like something like Big Red. Can I say that? O.K. Big Red, Big Red gum.”

When the research team visited the Jahai, rain-forest foragers on the Malay Peninsula, they found that the Jahai were succinct and more accurate with the scratch-and-sniff cards. In fact, they were about as good at naming what they smelled as what they saw. They do, in fact, have an abstract term for the shared odor in bat droppings and the leaf of ginger root. Abstract odor terms are common among people on the Malay Peninsula.

The team also found that several communities — speakers of Persian, Turkish and Zapotec — used different metaphors than English and Dutch speakers to describe pitch, or frequency: Sounds were thin or thick rather than high or low. In later work, they demonstrated that the metaphors were powerful enough to disrupt perception. When Dutch speakers heard a tone while being shown a mismatched height bar (e.g., a high tone and a low bar) and were asked to sing the tone, they sang a lower tone. But the perception wasn’t influenced when they were shown a thin or thick bar. When Persian speakers heard a tone and were shown a bar of mismatched thickness, however, they misremembered the tone — but not when they were shown a bar mismatched for height.

The team also found that some of these differences could change over time. They taught the Dutch speakers to think about pitch as thin or thick, and soon these participants, too, found that their memory of a tone was affected by being shown a bar that was too thick or too thin. They found that younger Cantonese speakers had fewer words for tastes and smells than older ones, a shift attributed to rapid socioeconomic development and Western-style schooling.

I wrote this in Florence, Italy, a city famous as a feast for the senses. People say that Florence teaches you to see differently — that as the soft light moves across the ocher buildings, you see colors you never noticed before.

It taught Kevin Systrom, a co-founder of Instagram, to see differently. He attributes his inspiration to a photography class he took in Florence while at a Stanford study-abroad program about a decade ago. His teacher took away his state-of-the-art camera and insisted he use an old plastic one instead, to change the way he saw. He loved those photos, the vintage feel of them, and the way the buildings looked in the light. He set out to recreate that look in the app he built. And that has changed the way many of us now see as well."
senses  taste  smell  olfaction  touch  sight  seeing  noticing  language  languages  culture  darylbem  tmluhrmann  constanceclassen  wcydwt  glvo  slow  marshallmcluhan  anthropology  psychology  perception  sense  asifamajid  stephenlevinson  sound  hearing  tone  pitch  rhythm  color  comparison  schooling  unschooling  deschooling  literacies  literacy  identification  naming  kevinsystrom 
september 2014 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » My Opening Keynote for CUE 2014
"I started by describing why edtech presentations often make me aggravated. Then I described my "edtech mission statement," which helps me through those presentations and helps me make tough choices for my limited resources."

[Direct link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRsE6mKkDjw ]

BTW. I was also interviewed at CUE for the Infinite Thinking Machine with Mark Hammons.

[That video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1J831tffJ4 ]
edtech  danmeyer  teaching  math  mathematics  technology  curiosity  cue  cue2014  perplexity  online  internet  howwework  sharing  blogging  professionaldevelopment  learning  education  noticing  interestedness  del.icio.us  rss  interestingness  keynote  documentcameras  photography  video  mobile  phones  remembering  ela  languagearts  wcydwt  2014  askingquestions  presentations  engagement  lectures  lecturing  questionasking  interested 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Conditional Design: Workbook: Andrew Blauvelt, Koert Van Mensvoort: 9789078088585: Amazon.com: Books
[Book website: http://workbook.conditionaldesign.org/ ]
[See also: http://conditionaldesign.org/archive/ and
http://conditionaldesign.org/ and
http://conditionaldesign.org/pages/about-us/ ]

""Conditional Design" is the name of a new design ethos formulated by graphic designers Luna Maurer, Jonathan Puckey and Roel Wouters, and artist Edo Paulus. It espouses a working method that involves drawing up arbitrary constraints and rules of play, fostering both a strongly collaborative spirit and unpredictable end results. Conditional Design provides beautifully simple ideas for open, collaborative processes in art and design. Its workbook format organizes the material step by step, and the publication as a whole provides exciting ways for others--groups of children as well as artists and designers--to apply the method themselves. In accompanying essays, Andrew Blauvelt elaborates on the implications of such processes for art and design, and Koert van Mensvoort describes how Conditional Design could form the basis for the design and organization of the city of Zhiango, China, in 2050."
design  conditionaldesign  play  lunamaurer  jonathanpuckey  roelwouters  edopaulus  moniker  collaboration  art  openstudioproject  classideas  lcproject  andrewblauvelt  koertvanmensvoort  zhiango  chinaprocess  howwework  organization  2014  contraints  rules  unpredictability  children  books  toread  wcydwt 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Meteor Blocks
"Meteor Blocks uses the Meteor web framework and X3DOM together to create a collaborative 3D scene editor.

When you want to collaborate, just send the URL of the scene you are editing to someone else and they can edit it with you. When you're done and you want to save a version of your scene, just click Publish and it's enshrined in history.

Check out the code on GitHub."

[via: http://prostheticknowledge.tumblr.com/post/75842987481/meteor-blocks-simple-collaborative-voxel-editor ]
blocks  wcydwt  meteor  x3dom  sceneeditor  collaboration  drawing  onlinetoolkit  building  buildingtools 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Preschool lessons: New research shows that teaching kids more and more, at ever-younger ages, may backfire.
"In the first study, MIT professor Laura Schulz, her graduate student Elizabeth Bonawitz, and their colleagues looked at how 4-year-olds learned about a new toy with four tubes. Each tube could do something interesting: If you pulled on one tube it squeaked, if you looked inside another tube you found a hidden mirror, and so on. For one group of children, the experimenter said: "I just found this toy!" As she brought out the toy, she pulled the first tube, as if by accident, and it squeaked. She acted surprised ("Huh! Did you see that? Let me try to do that!") and pulled the tube again to make it squeak a second time. With the other children, the experimenter acted more like a teacher. She said, "I'm going to show you how my toy works. Watch this!" and deliberately made the tube squeak. Then she left both groups of children alone to play with the toy.

All of the children pulled the first tube to make it squeak. The question was whether they would also learn about the other things the toy could do. The children from the first group played with the toy longer and discovered more of its "hidden" features than those in the second group. In other words, direct instruction made the children less curious and less likely to discover new information.

Does direct teaching also make children less likely to draw new conclusions—or, put another way, does it make them less creative? To answer this question, Daphna Buchsbaum, Tom Griffiths, Patrick Shafto, and I gave another group of 4-year-old children a new toy. * This time, though, we demonstrated sequences of three actions on the toy, some of which caused the toy to play music, some of which did not. For example, Daphna might start by squishing the toy, then pressing a pad on its top, then pulling a ring on its side, at which point the toy would play music. Then she might try a different series of three actions, and it would play music again. Not every sequence she demonstrated worked, however: Only the ones that ended with the same two actions made the music play. After showing the children five successful sequences interspersed with four unsuccessful ones, she gave them the toy and told them to "make it go."

Daphna ran through the same nine sequences with all the children, but with one group, she acted as if she were clueless about the toy. ("Wow, look at this toy. I wonder how it works? Let's try this," she said.) With the other group, she acted like a teacher. ("Here's how my toy works.") When she acted clueless, many of the children figured out the most intelligent way of getting the toy to play music (performing just the two key actions, something Daphna had not demonstrated). But when Daphna acted like a teacher, the children imitated her exactly, rather than discovering the more intelligent and more novel two-action solution.

As so often happens in science, two studies from different labs, using different techniques, have simultaneously produced strikingly similar results. They provide scientific support for the intuitions many teachers have had all along: Direct instruction really can limit young children's learning. Teaching is a very effective way to get children to learn something specific—this tube squeaks, say, or a squish then a press then a pull causes the music to play. But it also makes children less likely to discover unexpected information and to draw unexpected conclusions."
psychology  play  parenting  lifestyle  toys  2011  via:lukeneff  learning  directinstruction  motivation  discovery  boredom  alisongopnik  pedagogy  howweteach  wcydwt  constructivism  lauraschulz  daphnabuchsbaum  tomgriffiths  patrickshafto  teaching  noahgoodman 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Unhangout
"Unhangout is an open source platform for running large scale online un-conference-style events using Google Hangouts to create many simultaneous small sessions. Think of it like a classroom with infinitely many breakout rooms. We provide a text-based chat experience that can support hundreds of participants chatting or watching a live video stream together. When you want to create more opportunity for participation, you can break out into up-to-ten person Google Hangout sessions that create opportunities for peer learning instead of just top-down information transfer that is typical in large scale online education.

Open Source
Unhangout is an open source project. You can find the code in our repository on GitHub. Please let us know if you're interested in hosting your own unhangout events - we would be happy to help you get this set up on your own servers. In some situations, we might be able to host your event on our installation, too.

The Team
Our three person design and development team is based at the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, MA.

Philipp Schmidt
Drew Harry
Srishti Sethi

Acknowledgements
Unhangout is made possible by the generous support of the MacArthur Foundation and the MIT Media Lab"

[via and more: http://dmlcentral.net/blog/philipp-schmidt/unhangouts ]
edtech  unconferences  snarkmarketseminar  opensource  philippschmidt  drewharry  srishtisethi  googlehangouts  wcydwt  video  education  teaching  learning  onlinetoolkit 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Dotsies
"That says "dotsies is here". Dotsies is a font that uses dots instead of letters. The latin alphabet (abc...) was created thousands of years ago, and is optimized for writing, not reading. About time for an update, no? Dotsies is optimized for reading. The letters in each word smoosh together, so words look like shapes! Follow me on twitter for periodic tips on learning it (it's not that hard) or to tell me what you think."

["How to Learn" page: http://dotsies.org/learn/ ]
decoding  writing  wcydwt  classideas  fun  words  symbols  codes  via:caseygollan  dotsies  language  typography 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Writing Live Fieldnotes: Towards a More Open Ethnography | Ethnography Matters
"I just returned from fieldwork in China. I’m excited to share a new way I’ve been writing ethnographic fieldnotes, called live fieldnoting…

At one point in time, all ethnographers wrote their notes down with a physical pen and paper. But with mobiles, laptops, iPads, and digital pens, not all ethnographers write their fieldnotes. Some type their fieldnotes. Or some do both. With all these options, I have struggled to come up with the perfect fieldnote system…

…the problem with a digital pen, notebook, and laptop is that they are all extra things that have to be carried with you or they add extra steps to the process…

I still haven’t found the perfect fieldnote system, but I wanted to experiment with a new process that I call, “live fieldnoting.” …

…updates everyday from the field. … compilation on Instagram, flickr, facebook, tumblr, and foursquare. I made my research transparent and accessible with daily fieldnotes. Anyone who wanted to follow along in my adventure could see…"
mobile  signs  research  flashbacks  moments  rituals  customs  location  travel  participatoryfieldnoting  socialfieldnoting  johnvanmaanen  ethnographymatters  rachelleannenchino  jennaburrell  heatherford  jorisluyendijk  gabriellacoleman  janchipchase  lindashaw  rachelfretz  robertemerson  photography  iphone  china  noticing  observation  transparency  2012  foursquare  tumblr  facebook  flickr  instagram  triciawang  howwework  process  wcydwt  notetaking  designresearch  fieldnoting  fieldnotes  ethnography  ritual  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Telescopic Text
"telescopictext.org is an extension of telescopictext.com, and is primarily a set of tools for creating expanding texts in a similar way. The tools can be found by clicking Write in the navigation at the top. Texts will house an ongoing collection of selected texts. Resources provides help for using this website, and also any news, updates, guides, support and a Q&A.; If you need further information or help, contact info@telescopictext.com. You can Register in order to save and publish texts, or Sign in if you already have an account. If you like what you find here and you want to help support it you can Donate."
micromacro  collaboration  wcydwt  language  via:maxfenton  text  telescopic  telescopictext  literacy  tools  writing  sentences  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
Kill Screen - Infinity Blade Review
[Not really sure how to describe this sort of writing. Don't miss the button at the end, which initiates an animation/alteration of the text, then reappears multiple times for additional iterations.]

"How to read a game that never ends.

Infinity Blade is a game about iteration, about retreading old ground, about the small changes that surface across endless repetitions."

[Referenced here: http://www.designculturelab.org/2012/02/26/hi-my-name-is-anne-i-make-stuff-with-words/ ]

[Update 23 July 2012: See these two also: http://killscreendaily.com/articles/essays/ico-feature/ AND http://www.robinsloan.com/summer-reading/and-programming/ (now here: http://www.robinsloan.com/archive/summer-reading/ ) for a new genre.]
glvo  edg  srg  fantasy  generations  swords  design  philosophy  art  via:meetar  infinityblade  animatedwriting  evolutionarywriting  iterative  iterativewriting  wcydwt  classideas  storytelling  jnicholasgeist  web  writing  games  moreofthisplease  evolvingtext  iteration  futureoftext  evolvingbook  killscreen  experimental  reviews  videogames  gaming  tickletext  digitalsertão  telescopictext  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
Dr. Chris Mullen, The Visual Telling of Stories, illustration, design, film, narrative sequences, magazines, books, prints etc
"A lyrical encyclopedia of visual proportions…Rugged design in opposition to elegance…It's bigger than you could ever think—just explore—no clues from me…big letter and no fancy-dan embroidery—on opposition to the fey…"

"This site records a range of material dedicated to the study of the Visual Narrative. The original site, intended by me for part-time students and other interested parties was closed down by the University of Brighton in 2004. I was subsequently denied access to the original images most of which, however, were in my own collection. I have developed the site on a daily basis thereafter. It remains exclusively educational and is in constant use. Many thanks to those in the UK and beyond who shared my irritation at events. Contact me on chris@fulltable.com "
writing  stories  narrativesequences  magazines  narrative  film  treasure  susia  philbeard  rebeccamarywilson  hypertext  ruthrix  janecouldrey  clarestrand  grammercypark  petruccelli  jackiebatey  jaynewilson  dickbriel  chrismullen  america  visual  visualcodes  advertising  comics  classideas  tcsnmy  srg  edg  glossary  reference  books  images  visualization  wcydwt  art  design  illustration  storytelling  via:litherland 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Text analysis, wordcount, keyword density analyzer, prominence analysis
"Welcome to the online text analysis tool, the detailed statistics of your text, perfect for translators (quoting), for webmasters (ranking) or for normal users, to know the subject of a text. Now with new features as the anlysis of words groups, finding out the keyword density, analyse the prominence of word or expressions. Webmasters can analyse the links on their pages. More instructions are about to be written, please send us your feedback!"
english  wcydwt  classideas  onlinetoolkit  text  software  analysis  research  language  tools  writing  from delicious
december 2011 by robertogreco
Newswordy: Word of the day
"Buzzwords are frequently used in news media. These are words that do not typically occur in everyday speech, but are common among newscasters, talking heads, and pundits on cable news.

These ‘news words’ are accepted by audiences for their implied meaning. But often loaded words are misused or used out of context. The actual definitions can be different than what is implied.

Newswordy is a growing collection of these words, updated every weekday. Along with each word is a definition, a quote with its use (or misuse) in the media, and a news and Twitter feed on the subject."
education  media  language  misuse  outofcontext  writing  journalism  classideas  wcydwt  english  news  twitter  definitions  vocabulary  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
PHRAS.IN - Say this or say that?
"Because spell checkers only do 80% of the job.

If you, like me, speak English as a second language, you know that using correct spelling doesn't protect you from writing those awkward sounding lines.

Tell me, how many times did you come up with two ways to say the same thing, and couldn't decide which one was the best fit?

My solution was to google both expressions and check out the number of web results.

Low figures meant that very few people ever phrased the sentence that way, thus it was probably incorrect.

On the other hand, higher numbers indicated common use, and the 3 line preview in the results helped me figure out if I was using the right form.

This tool does just that, in a much quicker and convenient way."

"Tip: You can get results straight from the address bar, just type http://phras.in/phrase1/phrase2 "
phras.in  writing  comparison  language  english  phrasing  usage  commonuse  classideas  wcydwt  from delicious
august 2011 by robertogreco
275 Cultural Icons: Great Artists, Writers & Thinkers in Their Own Words | Open Culture
"Great writers, dazzling filmmakers and musicians, brilliant philosophers and scientists — you can now hear and see them in their own words. Here we present audio and video that captures the words of our greatest cultural icons."
education  culture  art  writing  writers  video  thinkers  filmmaking  music  firstperson  audio  classideas  primarysources  wcydwt  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
WCYDWT English? « Bionic Teaching
"Every question I come up with ends up with possible skills all over the place but missing the requirement for a specific skill or set of skills. In English it often seems like you can accomplish an answer but it’s less a puzzle to figure out that will require specific skills and more of a task to accomplish that can be completed to a greater or lesser degree depending on a variety of skills2.

I wonder if it doesn’t come down to the fact that in English we often lack a definitive “right” answer. It could be I’m just failing to think properly about this. …

There’s something to be said for just having fun with the language and letting some things be messy. That’s good and fine but I still think there are ways to get at more specific understandings using the WCYDWT format."
wcydwt  teaching  english  writing  reading  language  classideas  messiness  communication  grammar  rules  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Think Thank Thunk » And Then a Sentient Pillar of Smoke Killed Them All
"Let me ask you this: How can I introduce a conjecture-soliciting-supernatural-formless-murderer into each of my lessons? Or, how can I make the students throw the question at me?

Dan has done a fantastic job of explaining the storytelling/WCYDWT aspect for math ed., and I’d like to do the same for science. Here are few examples of lessons I’m going to try this year that have a CSSFM component…"
teaching  science  wcydwt  storytelling  tcsnmy  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Kobe, Karplus, and Inquiry « Action-Reaction
"This video (taken from the Win/Fail Physics collection) is the beginning and the end of a mini learning cycle during my projectile motion unit. At the beginning of the unit, it’s the hook. At the end of the unit, it’s the assessment."

[via: http://twitter.com/jybuell/status/20277278711 ]
physics  wcydwt  science  teaching  exploration  invention  application  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
News for You Online
"News for You Online.com is an online news source designed for people who are learning to read, write, or speak English. Seven new stories are posted weekly for 48 weeks a year. These engaging articles are based on world and national news events. They are written at reading levels 3-6 and ESL levels high-beginning and low-intermediate.
education  english  ged  learning  listening  pronunciation  reading  vocabulary  literacy  news  currentevents  ell  esl  classideas  tcsnmy  wcydwt 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Tinkerings » Patient Problem Solvers [via: http://blog.mrmeyer.com/?p=6929]
"So I’ve been thinking of ways to make kids patient problem solvers in language arts. We drill and kill all these rules for spelling, punctuation, sentence structure, and more. But I’m afraid kids lose a fundamental truth needed to understand their importance: Why are we doing this?
education  english  grammar  howto  wcydwt  classideas  learning  teaching  tcsnmy  writing  language  languagearts 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Lecture Method vs. Peer Instruction « Zero-Knowledge Proofs
"# Students who have recently learned something are better at explaining it to other students than teacher who learned & mastered it years ago. It is difficult for a teacher who has mastery of a concept to be aware of conceptual difficulties of beginning learner.

# Give students more responsibility for gathering info & make it our job to help them w/ assimilation.

# You can’t learn Physics by watching someone else solve problems...wouldn’t learn to pay piano by watching someone else...If you want to learn problem solving, you have to do problems.

# Better understanding leads to better problem solving...converse...not necessarily true. Better problem solving does not necessarily indicate better understanding.

# Education is no longer about info transfer.

# in his original methods he covered a lot, but the students didn’t retain much so coverage was basically meaningless. In his new method, he has relaxed the coverage a little bit, but increased the comprehension enormously."
wcydwt  teaching  education  depthoverbreadth  via:lukeneff  lectures  peerinstruction  tcsnmy  doing  conceptualunderstanding  understanding  math  physics  learning  information  problemsolving  criticalthinking 
june 2010 by robertogreco
blog.mrstacey.org.uk : WCYDWT: The History Edition
"While I may not be taking digital snaps and cutting up video, I’m starting to see that the WCYDWT approach is close to the heart of how many of us (in the UK at least) teach history. To put this idea to the test, over the next few weeks I’m going to be posting some examples of resources and materials I’ve been using (or plan to us) as ISMs*. I’ll stick to Dan’s practice of posting the resource first, and following it with my idea a little while after. I’d be interested to hear both from history teachers about how they would (or do) use this resource, and from teachers in other subjects on their views of the approach, how it might work for them, or how much I’ve misunderstood what Dan meant!"
wcydwt  history  teaching  tcsnmy 
june 2010 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » Teaching WCYDWT: Learning [this links to a comment by Luke Neff]
"The main problem or difference between WCYDWT for English as compared to math is that it’s hard to know what they’ll do with these things you give to them. Sometimes it takes unexpected turns. I’m learning to go with the flow on these things.
lukeneff  wcydwt  flow  teaching  learning  tcsnmy  english  humanities  classideas  danmeyer 
may 2010 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » TEDxNYED Metadata [Forgot to bookmark this—thanks to Basti for making it resurface. Also, see the comment from Michael Wesch.]
"I'm not saying that the only people capable of describing or critiquing classroom teaching are classroom teachers. There are people who don't work in a classroom who know a lot more about my business than I do. I'm saying it's difficult, as one of public education's foot soldiers, to do much with inspiration. I don't have many places to put inspiration, certainly not as many as the edtechnologists walking away from TEDxNYED minds buzzing, faces aglow, and so it tends to settle and coagulate around my bile duct. It's too hard to forget that tomorrow I and three million others will have to teach too many standards of too little quality to too many students with too few resources. What can you do with this?"
danmeyer  education  tedxnyed  curriculum  math  reflection  reform  theory  practical  doingvsimagining  wcydwt  teaching  schools  doing  inspiration  doingvsinspiring  edtech  hereandnow  now  implementation  constraints  frustration  flexibility  constructivecriticism  power  control  jeffjarvis  michaelwesch  georgesiemens  davidwiley  andycarvin 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Trends in Ed, 2.18.10 | EdLab - Math sees a future with web 2.0
"Is it a match made in Heaven? According to Maria Droujkova, developer of Natural Math and Math 2.0, it is! Droujikova saw the need for math to catch up to other subjects with regards to web 2.0 communities. Her response was to create math programs in which learning takes place within communities and networks-- a mashup between traditional math practices and social networking. This has given birth to the concept of social math:"
math  teaching  learning  education  tcsnmy  collaborative  networking  social  authoring  community  psychology  scratch  geogebra  danmeyer  wcydwt  xkcd  youtube  manyeyes  flickr  voicethread  problemsolving  instructables 
february 2010 by robertogreco

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