robertogreco + visual   156

p5.js
“p5.js is a JavaScript library for creative coding, with a focus on making coding accessible and inclusive for artists, designers, educators, beginners, and anyone else! p5.js is free and open-source because we believe software, and the tools to learn it, should be accessible to everyone.

Using the metaphor of a sketch, p5.js has a full set of drawing functionality. However, you’re not limited to your drawing canvas. You can think of your whole browser page as your sketch, including HTML5 objects for text, input, video, webcam, and sound.”

[via: https://usesthis.com/interviews/maya.man/ ]
p5.js  javascript  processing  programming  js  art  coding  visual  sound  graphics  video  webcams  html5 
7 weeks ago by robertogreco
Animals, Anthropomorphism and Mediated Encounters: 1st Edition (Hardback) - Routledge
"This book critically investigates the pervasiveness of anthropomorphised animals in popular culture.

Anthropomorphism in popular visual media has long been denounced for being unsophisticated or emotionally manipulative. It is often criticised for over-expressing similarities between humans and other animals. This book focuses on everyday encounters with visual representations of anthropomorphised animals and considers how attributing other animals with humanlike qualities speaks to a complex set of power relations. Through a series of case studies, it explores how anthropomorphism is produced and circulated and proposes that it can serve to create both misunderstandings and empathetic connections between humans and other animals.

This book will appeal to academics and students interested in visual media, animal studies, sociology and cultural studies."
animalstudies  animals  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  anthropomorphism  multispecies  morethanhuman  culture  visual  books  claireparkinson 
august 2019 by robertogreco
The Inordinate Eye: New World Baroque and Latin American Fiction, Zamora
"The Inordinate Eye traces the relations of Latin American painting, sculpture, architecture, and literature—the stories they tell each other and the ways in which their creators saw the world and their place in it. Moving from pre-Columbian codices and sculpture through New World Baroque art and architecture to Neobaroque theory and contemporary Latin American fiction, Lois Parkinson Zamora argues for an integrated understanding of visual and verbal forms.
 
The New World Baroque combines indigenous, African, and European forms of expression, and, in the early decades of the twentieth century, Latin American writers began to recuperate its visual structures to construct an alternative account of modernity, using its hybrid forms for the purpose of creating a discourse of “counterconquest”—a postcolonial self-definition aimed at disrupting entrenched power structures, perceptual categories, and literary forms.   

Zamora engages this process, discussing a wide range of visual forms—Baroque façades and altarpieces, portraits of saints and martyrs (including the self-portraits of Frida Kahlo), murals from indigenous artisans to Diego Rivera—to elucidate works of fiction by Borges, Carpentier, Lezama Lima, Sarduy, Garro, García Márquez, and Galeano, and also to establish a critical perspective external to their work. Because visual media are “other” to the verbal economy of modern fiction, they serve these writers (and their readers) as oblique means by which to position their fiction culturally, politically, and aesthetically.
 
The first study of its kind in scope and ambition, The Inordinate Eye departs radically from most studies of literature by demonstrating how transcultural conceptions of the visual image have conditioned present ways of seeing and reading in Latin America."
latinamerica  culture  literature  fiction  art  architecture  loisparkinsonzamora  visual  verbal  baroque  fridakhalo  diegorivera  borges  alejocarpentier  josélezamalima  gabrielgarcíamárquez  eduardogaleano  2006  neobaroque  severosarduy  elenagarro  modernity  conunterconquest  postcolonialism  disruption  transcultural  imagery  seeing  reading 
june 2019 by robertogreco
Critical Media Practice
"a secondary field for Harvard University graduate students

The Graduate School in Arts and Sciences offers a secondary field in Critical Media Practice (CMP) for Harvard PhD students who wish to integrate media creation into their academic work. CMP reflects changing patterns of knowledge dissemination, especially innovative research that is often conducted or presented using media practices in which written language may only play a part. Audiovisual media have relationships to the world that are distinct from exclusively verbal sign systems and are able to reveal different dimensions of understanding.  They are inherently interdisciplinary and frequently engage a broader audience than the academy alone.

Students interested in creating original interpretive projects in still or moving images, sound, installation, internet applications, or other media in conjunction with their written scholarship may apply to pursue the CMP secondary field. It connects students with courses, workshops, and advising on production of media in different formats. Critical Media Practice is overseen by the Film Study Center."



"In areas across the disciplinary map — from Anthropology to Science Studies, from Sociology, Psychology, and Government to Architecture, Literature, Engineering, and Public Health — a growing number of students and faculty are seeking to integrate media creation into their academic work. The goal of the interdepartmental GSAS secondary field in Critical Media Practice is to offer graduate students across Harvard’s various schools the opportunity to make original interpretive, creative projects in image, sound, and interactive technologies in tandem with their written scholarship.

Our students work across many disciplines and in a variety of media. They span a continuum from those using artistic practices to conduct or present their scholarly research to those whose work finds its place in the art world itself. All share an excitement for art as research. They are furthering Harvard’s prominence as a place where academic inquiry can take compelling forms beyond the written word.

The human subject is constituted by imaging as well as by language and – as C.S. Peirce, Nelson Goodman, and others have demonstrated – language alone cannot be taken as paradigmatic for meaning. Aural and visual experience is as integral to culture and social relations as is language. Recent developments in neuroscience and evolutionary psychology have emphasized that consciousness itself consists of multi-stranded networks of signification that combine fragments of imagery, sensation, and memory alongside language, both propositional and non-propositional in form.

The Critical Media Practice secondary field is designed to take advantage of the fact that audiovisual media have a distinct, unique relationship to the world than exclusively verbal sign systems. It also exploits their inherent interdisciplinarity and their broader reach beyond the academy into the public intellectual sphere.

From stunning anthropological films documenting cultural traditions to interactive databases to installations exploring engineering and design, CMP projects push the boundaries of scholarship.

CMP integrates art-making within the cognitive life of the university, and specifically the graduate curriculum. Because media practice is the central component of CMP, it is distinct from a Ph.D. program in film studies, cultural studies, or any of the particular humanities or social sciences. Instead, CMP is intended to complement — to broaden and enrich — the teaching and research being undertaken in our graduate degree programs."
harvard  criticalmediapractice  sensoryethnographylab  film  interdisciplinary  media  mediacreation  cspeirce  nelsongoodman  meaning  audio  aural  visual  multisensory  multiliteracies  consciousness  sensation  memory  language  audiovisual  srg  luciencastaing-taylor  jeffreyschnapp 
may 2019 by robertogreco
Language Is Migrant - South Magazine Issue #8 [documenta 14 #3] - documenta 14
"Language is migrant. Words move from language to language, from culture to culture, from mouth to mouth. Our bodies are migrants; cells and bacteria are migrants too. Even galaxies migrate.

What is then this talk against migrants? It can only be talk against ourselves, against life itself.

Twenty years ago, I opened up the word “migrant,” seeing in it a dangerous mix of Latin and Germanic roots. I imagined “migrant” was probably composed of mei, Latin for “to change or move,” and gra, “heart” from the Germanic kerd. Thus, “migrant” became “changed heart,”
a heart in pain,
changing the heart of the earth.

The word “immigrant” says, “grant me life.”

“Grant” means “to allow, to have,” and is related to an ancient Proto-Indo-European root: dhe, the mother of “deed” and “law.” So too, sacerdos, performer of sacred rites.

What is the rite performed by millions of people displaced and seeking safe haven around the world? Letting us see our own indifference, our complicity in the ongoing wars?

Is their pain powerful enough to allow us to change our hearts? To see our part in it?

I “wounder,” said Margarita, my immigrant friend, mixing up wondering and wounding, a perfect embodiment of our true condition!

Vicente Huidobro said, “Open your mouth to receive the host of the wounded word.”

The wound is an eye. Can we look into its eyes?
my specialty is not feeling, just
looking, so I say:
(the word is a hard look.)
—Rosario Castellanos

I don’t see with my eyes: words
are my eyes.
—Octavio Paz

In l980, I was in exile in Bogotá, where I was working on my “Palabrarmas” project, a way of opening words to see what they have to say. My early life as a poet was guided by a line from Novalis: “Poetry is the original religion of mankind.” Living in the violent city of Bogotá, I wanted to see if anybody shared this view, so I set out with a camera and a team of volunteers to interview people in the street. I asked everybody I met, “What is Poetry to you?” and I got great answers from beggars, prostitutes, and policemen alike. But the best was, “Que prosiga,” “That it may go on”—how can I translate the subjunctive, the most beautiful tiempo verbal (time inside the verb) of the Spanish language? “Subjunctive” means “next to” but under the power of the unknown. It is a future potential subjected to unforeseen conditions, and that matches exactly the quantum definition of emergent properties.

If you google the subjunctive you will find it described as a “mood,” as if a verbal tense could feel: “The subjunctive mood is the verb form used to express a wish, a suggestion, a command, or a condition that is contrary to fact.” Or “the ‘present’ subjunctive is the bare form of a verb (that is, a verb with no ending).”

I loved that! A never-ending image of a naked verb! The man who passed by as a shadow in my film saying “Que prosiga” was on camera only for a second, yet he expressed in two words the utter precision of Indigenous oral culture.

People watching the film today can’t believe it was not scripted, because in thirty-six years we seem to have forgotten the art of complex conversation. In the film people in the street improvise responses on the spot, displaying an awareness of language that seems to be missing today. I wounder, how did it change? And my heart says it must be fear, the ocean of lies we live in, under a continuous stream of doublespeak by the violent powers that rule us. Living under dictatorship, the first thing that disappears is playful speech, the fun and freedom of saying what you really think. Complex public conversation goes extinct, and along with it, the many species we are causing to disappear as we speak.

The word “species” comes from the Latin speciēs, “a seeing.” Maybe we are losing species and languages, our joy, because we don’t wish to see what we are doing.

Not seeing the seeing in words, we numb our senses.

I hear a “low continuous humming sound” of “unmanned aerial vehicles,” the drones we send out into the world carrying our killing thoughts.

Drones are the ultimate expression of our disconnect with words, our ability to speak without feeling the effect or consequences of our words.

“Words are acts,” said Paz.

Our words are becoming drones, flying robots. Are we becoming desensitized by not feeling them as acts? I am thinking not just of the victims but also of the perpetrators, the drone operators. Tonje Hessen Schei, director of the film Drone, speaks of how children are being trained to kill by video games: “War is made to look fun, killing is made to look cool. ... I think this ‘militainment’ has a huge cost,” not just for the young soldiers who operate them but for society as a whole. Her trailer opens with these words by a former aide to Colin Powell in the Bush/Cheney administration:
OUR POTENTIAL COLLECTIVE FUTURE. WATCH IT AND WEEP FOR US. OR WATCH IT AND DETERMINE TO CHANGE THAT FUTURE
—Lawrence Wilkerson, Colonel U.S. Army (retired)


In Astro Noise, the exhibition by Laura Poitras at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the language of surveillance migrates into poetry and art. We lie in a collective bed watching the night sky crisscrossed by drones. The search for matching patterns, the algorithms used to liquidate humanity with drones, is turned around to reveal the workings of the system. And, we are being surveyed as we survey the show! A new kind of visual poetry connecting our bodies to the real fight for the soul of this Earth emerges, and we come out woundering: Are we going to dehumanize ourselves to the point where Earth itself will dream our end?

The fight is on everywhere, and this may be the only beauty of our times. The Quechua speakers of Peru say, “beauty is the struggle.”

Maybe darkness will become the source of light. (Life regenerates in the dark.)

I see the poet/translator as the person who goes into the dark, seeking the “other” in him/herself, what we don’t wish to see, as if this act could reveal what the world keeps hidden.

Eduardo Kohn, in his book How Forests Think: Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human notes the creation of a new verb by the Quichua speakers of Ecuador: riparana means “darse cuenta,” “to realize or to be aware.” The verb is a Quichuan transfiguration of the Spanish reparar, “to observe, sense, and repair.” As if awareness itself, the simple act of observing, had the power to heal.

I see the invention of such verbs as true poetry, as a possible path or a way out of the destruction we are causing.

When I am asked about the role of the poet in our times, I only question: Are we a “listening post,” composing an impossible “survival guide,” as Paul Chan has said? Or are we going silent in the face of our own destruction?

Subcomandante Marcos, the Zapatista guerrilla, transcribes the words of El Viejo Antonio, an Indian sage: “The gods went looking for silence to reorient themselves, but found it nowhere.” That nowhere is our place now, that’s why we need to translate language into itself so that IT sees our awareness.

Language is the translator. Could it translate us to a place within where we cease to tolerate injustice and the destruction of life?

Life is language. “When we speak, life speaks,” says the Kaushitaki Upanishad.

Awareness creates itself looking at itself.

It is transient and eternal at the same time.

Todo migra. Let’s migrate to the “wounderment” of our lives, to poetry itself."
ceciliavicuña  language  languages  words  migration  immigration  life  subcomandantemarcos  elviejoantonio  lawrencewilkerson  octaviopaz  exile  rosariocastellanos  poetry  spanish  español  subjunctive  oral  orality  conversation  complexity  seeing  species  joy  tonjehessenschei  war  colinpowell  laurapoitras  art  visual  translation  eduoardokohn  quechua  quichua  healing  repair  verbs  invention  listening  kaushitakiupanishad  awareness  noticing  wondering  vicentehuidobro  wounds  woundering  migrants  unknown  future  potential  unpredictability  emergent  drones  morethanhuman  multispecies  paulchan  destruction  displacement  refugees  extinction  others  tolerance  injustice  justice  transience  ephemerality  ephemeral  canon  eternal  surveillance  patterns  algorithms  earth  sustainability  environment  indifference  complicity  dictatorship  documenta14  2017  classideas 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Is "Show Don't Tell" a Universal Truth or a Colonial Relic? | Literary Hub
"In his essay “The Storyteller” (1936), cultural critic Walter Benjamin mourns the death of oral and communal storytelling, taken over in modern history by the novel, the “birthplace of the solitary reader,” and information technology with a rise in capitalism. Yet, what Benjamin posits as the organic evolution of oral, communal practices of storytelling into modern modes of storytelling, consumed by a reader in “privacy,” is in fact, the understanding of a Western history of storytelling as a universal one. As Maggie Awadalla and Paul March-Russell suggest in the introduction to their anthology The Postcolonial Short Story (2012), many non-Western countries did not transition “organically” from oral to written storytelling with a rise in capitalism. For many formerly or currently colonized spaces like South Asia, Africa, Caribbean, American South and Native America, there has always existed a rich, vibrant tradition of oral storytelling, one that was marginalized, often violently, through an imposition of an allegedly modern, white Western language and culture. In their study, Postcolonial Studies: The Key Concepts (1998), Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths and Helen Tiffin defend “orality” not as a cultural precondition that morphed into a more advanced written culture, but orality as a counterpart to writing, where both co-exist, complement and transform each other constantly. This coexistence of oral and written modes of storytelling continues to thrive in postcolonial spaces, including those of Asia and Africa.

In her now-canonical essay “Characteristics of Negro Expression” (1934), Zora Neale Hurston makes a strong case for the use of vernacular—especially dialect and rhythm—in Black writing. In his story collection, Creole Folktales (1988) and equally canonical co-authored essay, “In Praise of Creoleness” (1989), Patrick Chamoiseau offers a manifesto for Caribbean storytelling that aims to free itself of French colonial gaze by transforming Martinican-French literature through a militant use of Creole. And while not through cultural theories or essays, contemporary writers like Salman Rushdie, Vikram Chandra, Roxane Gay, Junot Díaz, and Edwidge Danticat, among others, bring a strong, self-conscious vernacular in their stories. Their fiction questions not only an allegedly mainstream Euro-American storytelling marked by narrative brevity and an economy of words, as lauded by Edgar Allan Poe, John Barth and Francine Prose in their critical writing, but also the dominance of visuality in many fiction writing workshops with their show-don’t-tell credo, bolstered by our cinematic and digital age with its preference for images over sounds."



"James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Sandra Cisneros, Gish Jen, Tiphanie Yanique, ZZ Packer, Rajesh Parameswaran—the list of contemporary writing affirming oral and aural alternatives over a sight-based focus of storytelling is long. And I haven’t even gotten started with poetry-in-color, including an aesthetic legacy of rhythm in writing spawned by Papa Césaire and the Négritude movement. What I’ve explored above is a brief sampler on a multifaceted use of orality that challenges the boundaries of a more standard Euro-American literary English with its emphasis on brevity, clarity, and good grammar. In playing persistently with language, sounds and syntax, multiethnic fiction does not shy away from “writing in scenes,” however, it does dethrone the reign of eyesight to stress the importance of other senses in fiction, and hearing in particular.

That said, the use of vernacular or dialect is far from unique to non-Western writers writing within or outside the West. Time and again, major writers across the world have challenged the status quo of a hegemonic language by using the vernacular in different ways. I’m thinking here of Shakespeare and Louis-Ferdinand Celine’s linguistic innovation within English and French respectively, and of pioneering poets like Kabir who used the vernacular in Bhakti poetry to challenge the rule of Sanskrit in medieval South Asian literature.

And yet, the examples of multiethnic fiction I’ve shared above have all been published in the last couple of decades, following complex literary and historic changes that include mid-20th century’s wave of decolonization that swept the “third world,” the Civil Rights Movement in the US, the institutionalization of Ethnic Studies in the American Academy, and the literary canon wars that followed. This recent, layered, global history has led to a higher visibility of non-white, non-Western voices in the Western metropolitan publication scenes of New York, London and Paris. The content within contemporary multiethnic fiction often talks of identity, home and displacement; they ask questions like who has power and voice and who gets marginalized or silenced, these ideas fleshed out obsessively in stories through plot, theme, form, language, or a combination.

Orality within fiction that is deliberately engaging with power dynamics between the West and non-West—as evident in the title of Rushdie’s story collection East, West—thus becomes more than just a stylistic device or virtuosity with craft. The shift in sensory focus within multiethnic fiction from images to sounds holds a mirror to our contemporary, complex literary history, guiding the reader further to ways in which these stories maybe constructed, read, or deconstructed. Orality here becomes a political stance, an ideological move reminding the reader over and again that what we consume as universal in story craft, literary history, or aesthetic taste is anything but universal."
orality  oraltradition  visual  via:vruba  2018  storytelling  walterbenjamin  culture  tradition  namratapoddar  globalsouth  maggieawadalla  paulmarch-russell  billashcroft  garethgriffiths  helentiffin  vernacular  zoranealehurston  creole  creoleness  folktales  writing  salmanrushdie  vikramchandra  junotdíaz  edwidgedanticat  edgarallanpoe  johnbarth  fancineprose  criticalwriting  howwewrite  literacy  multiliteracies  dialect  rhythm  patrickchamoiseau  caribbean  africa  asia  colonialism  english  alicewalker  imperialism  gishjen  jamesbaldwin  tonimorrison  tiphanieyanique  zzpacker  showdon'ttell  sandracisneros  roxanegay  ajeshparameswaran  négritude  papacésaire  haiti  aural  oral  sight  brevity  clarity  grammar  fiction  aimécésaire  martinique  léopoldsédarsenghor  léondamas  postcolonialism  louis-ferdinandceline  latinamerica  indigenous  canon 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Advances in Visual Methodology | SAGE Publications Inc
"Sarah Pink draws together in a single volume a set of key writings on advances and explorations that sit at the innovative edge of theory and practice in contemporary visual research. Advances in Visual Methodology presents a critical engagement with interdisciplinary practice in the field of visual research and representation, examining the development of visual methodology as a field of interdisciplinary and post-disciplinary practice that spans scholarly and applied concerns. The book explores how new practice-based, theoretical and methodological engagements are developing and emerging in research practice; the impact new approaches are having on the types of knowledge visual research produces and critiques; the ways visual research intersect with new media; and the implications of this for social and cultural research, scholarship and intervention."
sarahpink  books  visualethnography  digitalethnography  ethnography  visual  anthropology  research  visualresearch 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Doing Visual Ethnography | SAGE Publications Inc
"Essential reading for anyone wishing to engage with images, technologies and society, Doing Visual Ethnography is a milestone in ethnographic and visual research. The Third Edition of this classic text includes new chapters on web-based practices for visual ethnography and the issues surrounding the representation, interpretation, and authoring of knowledge with the rise of digital media.  

The book provides a foundation for thinking about visual ethnography and introduces the practical and theoretical issues relating to the visual and digital technologies used in the field.  

Drawing upon her original research and the experiences of other ethnographers, author Sarah Pink once again challenges our understanding of the world and sets new agendas for visual ethnography by:

- Helpfully illustrating key concepts within real world contexts
- Introducing examples from both analogue and digital media
- Exploring material and electronic texts
- Setting out the shift towards applied, participatory and public visual scholarship.  

This book is a must-have for students and researchers across the social sciences who are interested in incorporating audiovisual media into their research practice.
sarahpink  books  visualethnography  visual  ethnography  anthropology  digital  web  internet  online  digitalmedia  audiovisual  senses  sensoryethnography 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Filmmaking with visual ethnography - an interview with Sarah Pink on Vimeo
"This video is an interview with Sarah Pink, Professor at RMIT and author of books such as 'Doing Visual Ethnography' and 'Doing Sensory Ethnography'. If you are interested in how to use visual ethnography as an aproach of filmmaking, then you will get some great notions on how to grasp this method. The topics we have asked Sarah Pink about is as following:

• Key principles
• Research and storytelling
• Most common mistakes
• Method and process
• Who is the audience?
• Sharing your work
• The future

Hope you will enjoy these tips!

The video is made by Dennis Haladyn and Thomas Legald at Roskilde University, Denmark - April 2015."
sarahpink  ethnography  2015  visual  visualethnography 
may 2018 by robertogreco
25 Language Arts Graphic Organizers for You and Your Kids
"Language arts graphic organizers just seem to work magic with kids.

I guess it's really no surprise--they just seem to GET IT better when they have a means of visually organizing their thoughts.

When they can analyze what they have read, when they can plan a writing project, or when they can collaborate with others in pictorial form, the "lights" in their heads just seem to burn more brightly.

The 25 language arts graphic organizers that you will see on this page, in my opinion, will enhance your instructional initiatives with your kids.

These PDF documents come with a clickable Table of Contents that makes it easier to quickly find what you need.

Just pick the one you want, print it, make copies for your kids, and hand them out! "
languagearts  vi:bopuc  organization  classideas  sfsh  writing  visual  charts  maps  mapping  mindmapping 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Rough Sketch for a Video Essay as Design Criticism—Jarrett Fuller
"The video, or film, essay gained popularity in the 1950s and 60s that trades typical narrative plots for themes and investigations. Drawing inspiration from Orson Welles, Charles and Ray Eames, and film critics working today, I how the video essay can be used to further design criticism online and bring critical writing about design to different audiences."
essays  videoessays  2016  jarrettfuller  film  eames  charleseames  rayeames  design  designcriticism  visual  orsonwelles  everyframeapainting  mattzoller  tonyzhou  fisforfake  filmcriticism  criticalwriting  criticism  srg 
june 2016 by robertogreco
On Repeat - Learning - Source: An OpenNews project
"How to use loops to explain anything"



"GIFs in the Future

I am pretty confident that there are many more ways to use GIFs for journalism. And while I’m not sure what sorts of forms GIFs will take in the future, I urge you to think of ways to bring loops into the world of storytelling on the web in a purposeful, insightful, or just plain humorous way. Because who knows what sorts of impossible or magical or transformative experiences we can create—all with the power of loops."
lenagroeger  gifs  journalism  video  looping  visual  history  animation  animatedgifs  eadweardmuybridge  howthingswork  explanation  probability  communication  classideas  repetition  storytelling  exposuretherapy  giphy 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Bat, Bean, Beam: The art of looking
"[image]

I think the reason why I find it so unsettling is that my eyes cannot come to a resting place. The ingrained left-to-right pull, reinforced by the lines traced by the bridge, forces me to look to the right. But in the bottom-left there is a body, and I want to look at that too for I am a human being and humanity is what I look for in most pictures. However, once I’ve looked at the body I can’t just stop there. The other reflex kicks back in, pushing me towards the right edge of the photograph again, and so on. However, if I flip the image

[image]

I don’t get that effect at all. Now the human subject is where my eyes come to a rest. The photograph has become more mournful than tragic, more melancholic than unsettling.

The theory also says that there are cultures that read and organise pictures in different ways. According to psychologist Lera Boroditsky, when experimental subjects are asked to arrange a shuffled bundle of photographs of a certain event into the correct temporal sequence
English speakers arrange time from left to right. Hebrew speakers do it from right to left (because Hebrew is written from right to left). […] In Mandarin, the future can be below and the past above. In Aymara, spoken in South America, the future is behind and the past in front.

I don’t know what this tells us – again, I am suspicious of the certainties of people who study the mind across different cultures – but I may have stumbled into my own supporting example, about 15 years after seeing the photograph by Cartier-Bresson. It comes from the Japanese manga Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms by Fumiyo Kōno, which is set in Hiroshima ten years after the bombing. In one scene, two lovers kiss on a bridge, but they are haunted by the memory of the bodies that once floated in the water below.

[image]

It’s a picture that had the identical unsettling effect on me as Cartier-Bresson's: again my eyes cannot come to a resting place, and keep going from the two lovers to the top right corner across the bridge and back again. However, this time I wonder if a native Japanese reader would effectively be looking at a mirror image. This would still be horrific, but devoid of the visual tension and the sense of being pulled concurrently into two directions - a not insignificant difference, in terms of the psychological effect and ultimately the meaning of the artwork.

I wonder, then, if along with a history of seeing we could talk of an art of looking: that is to say, a set of acquired techniques for making sense of the coded images of the culture in which we happen grow up. And, if so, whether we should think more deeply about intersemiotics and visual translation, even if it means nothing more than cultivating a measure of doubt in the universal appeal of images, and in our own capacity to make sense of them all."
henricartier-bresson  giovannitiso  2015  images  imagery  reading  howweread  language  culture  perspective  order  semiotics  intersemiotics  visual  leraboroditsky  psychology  conditioning  fumiyokōno 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Humane Representation of Thought on Vimeo
"Closing keynote at the UIST and SPLASH conferences, October 2014.
Preface: http://worrydream.com/TheHumaneRepresentationOfThought/note.html

References to baby-steps towards some of the concepts mentioned:

Dynamic reality (physical responsiveness):
- The primary work here is Hiroshi Ishii's "Radical Atoms": http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/
- but also relevant are the "Soft Robotics" projects at Harvard: http://softroboticstoolkit.com
- and at Otherlab: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gyMowPAJwqo
- and some of the more avant-garde corners of material science and 3D printing

Dynamic conversations and presentations:
- Ken Perlin's "Chalktalk" changes daily; here's a recent demo: http://bit.ly/1x5eCOX

Context-sensitive reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/

"Explore-the-model" reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/ExplorableExplanations/
- http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/
- http://ncase.me/polygons/
- http://redblobgames.com/pathfinding/a-star/introduction.html
- http://earthprimer.com/

Evidence-backed models:
- http://worrydream.com/TenBrighterIdeas/

Direct-manipulation dynamic authoring:
- http://worrydream.com/StopDrawingDeadFish/
- http://worrydream.com/DrawingDynamicVisualizationsTalk/
- http://tobyschachman.com/Shadershop/

Modes of understanding:
- Jerome Bruner: http://amazon.com/dp/0674897013
- Howard Gardner: http://amazon.com/dp/0465024335
- Kieran Egan: http://amazon.com/dp/0226190390

Embodied thinking:
- Edwin Hutchins: http://amazon.com/dp/0262581469
- Andy Clark: http://amazon.com/dp/0262531569
- George Lakoff: http://amazon.com/dp/0465037712
- JJ Gibson: http://amazon.com/dp/0898599598
- among others: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embodied_cognition

I don't know what this is all about:
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/responses.html

---

Abstract:

New representations of thought — written language, mathematical notation, information graphics, etc — have been responsible for some of the most significant leaps in the progress of civilization, by expanding humanity’s collectively-thinkable territory.

But at debilitating cost. These representations, having been invented for static media such as paper, tap into a small subset of human capabilities and neglect the rest. Knowledge work means sitting at a desk, interpreting and manipulating symbols. The human body is reduced to an eye staring at tiny rectangles and fingers on a pen or keyboard.

Like any severely unbalanced way of living, this is crippling to mind and body. But it is also enormously wasteful of the vast human potential. Human beings naturally have many powerful modes of thinking and understanding.

Most are incompatible with static media. In a culture that has contorted itself around the limitations of marks on paper, these modes are undeveloped, unrecognized, or scorned.

We are now seeing the start of a dynamic medium. To a large extent, people today are using this medium merely to emulate and extend static representations from the era of paper, and to further constrain the ways in which the human body can interact with external representations of thought.

But the dynamic medium offers the opportunity to deliberately invent a humane and empowering form of knowledge work. We can design dynamic representations which draw on the entire range of human capabilities — all senses, all forms of movement, all forms of understanding — instead of straining a few and atrophying the rest.

This talk suggests how each of the human activities in which thought is externalized (conversing, presenting, reading, writing, etc) can be redesigned around such representations.

---

Art by David Hellman.
Bret Victor -- http://worrydream.com "

[Some notes from Boris Anthony:

"Those of you who know my "book hack", Bret talks about exactly what motivates my explorations starting at 20:45 in https://vimeo.com/115154289 "
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574339495274876928

"From a different angle, btwn 20:00-29:00 Bret explains how "IoT" is totally changing everything
https://vimeo.com/115154289
@timoreilly @moia"
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574341875836043265 ]
bretvictor  towatch  interactiondesign  davidhellman  hiroshiishii  softrobotics  robots  robotics  kenperlin  jeromebruner  howardgardner  kieranegan  edwinhutchins  andyclark  jjgibson  embodiedcognition  cognition  writing  math  mathematics  infographic  visualization  communication  graphics  graphicdesign  design  representation  humans  understanding  howwelearn  howwethink  media  digital  dynamism  movement  conversation  presentation  reading  howweread  howwewrite  chalktalk  otherlab  3dprinting  3d  materials  physical  tangibility  depth  learning  canon  ui  informationdesign  infographics  maps  mapping  data  thinking  thoughts  numbers  algebra  arithmetic  notation  williamplayfair  cartography  gestures  placevalue  periodictable  michaelfaraday  jamesclerkmaxell  ideas  print  printing  leibniz  humanism  humanerepresentation  icons  visual  aural  kinesthetic  spatial  tactile  symbols  iot  internetofthings  programming  computers  screens  computation  computing  coding  modeling  exploration  via:robertogreco  reasoning  rhetoric  gerrysussman  environments  scale  virtualization 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Literacy Through Photography for English-Language Learners | Edutopia
"Enter most schools and you will hear about literacy instruction or the "literacy block." However, literacy is not a subject -- it is something much bigger. Paulo Freire encouraged a broader definition of literacy to include the ability to understand both "the word and the world." Literacy includes reading, writing, listening, speaking, and analyzing a wide range of texts that include both print and non-print texts.

Imagery and Language
This post will describe some ways in which teachers can use photography to support literacy standards. Photography supports literacy in several ways:

1. It is an excellent way to provide differentiation for English-language learners.

2. It relieves pressure from reluctant students or striving readers and writers by providing the opportunity to read and analyze photographs instead of traditional print texts.

3. It represents a culturally responsive teaching method as it demonstrates a way to welcome all voices in the classroom to be heard and valued.

This methodology is based on the work of Wendy Ewald, who writes extensively about literacy through photography.

The use of photographs provides a novel way to engage in analyzing text. Students can verbally describe their observations, ideas, and analysis in addition to listening to the ideas of their classmates. The use of photographs allows students to reflect and organize their thoughts in a creative way that cannot be achieved simply through writing. And for many students, this practice provides needed scaffolding for processing and organizing their thoughts in order to be ready to write about them."
photography  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  2014  english  ell  esl  tabethadell'angelo  imageary  literacy  literacies  visual  wendyewald  iwannatellmeastory  storytelling  focus  portraits  vocabulary  perspective  stories  imagery  language  paulofreire  multiliteracies 
december 2014 by robertogreco
High modernist subjectivity gives an extraordinary... • see things differently
""High modernist subjectivity gives an extraordinary privilege … to judgement and especially to cognition…. The modern predominance of reading….

High [modernism] … furthermore … privileges the cognitive and moral over the aesthetic and the libidinal, the ego over the id, the visual over touch, and discursive over figural communication.

…the individual [is] somehow ‘closed’ instead of open; to be somehow obsessed with self-mastery and self-domination."

Lash, S. & Friedman, J. (Eds.). (1993). Modernity & Identity. Massachusetts: Blackwell, pg. 5"

[See also: http://linguisticcapital.wordpress.com/2011/11/05/modernism-in-the-streets/

"High modernist subjectivity gives an extraordinary privilege, for example, to judgement and especially to cognition. It correspondingly devalues the faculty of perception, so that vision itself is so to speak colonized by cognition. The modern predominance of reading fosters epistemologies of representation, of a visual paradigm in the sphere of art [...]. High modernist subjectivity seems furthermore to privilege the cognitive and moral over the aesthetic and the libidinal, the ego over the id, the visual over touch, and discursive over figural communication. It gives primacy to culture over nature, to the individual over the community, As an ethics of responsibility, high modernist personality and Lebensfürung [life-course] it allows the individual to be somehow ‘closed’ instead of open; to be somehow obsessed with self-mastery and self-domination."

Lash, S. & Friedman, J. (Eds.). (1993). Modernity & Identity. Massachusetts: Blackwell, pg. 5]
modernism  highmodernism  bias  cognition  morality  aesthetics  libidinal  ego  id  visual  senses  touch  discursion  figurative  communication  reading  literacy  gutenbergparenthesis  self-mastery  self-domination  modernity  identity  1993 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Isotype Revisited | From hieroglyphics to Isotype
"From 1943 until his death in December 1945, Otto Neurath worked tirelessly on numerous versions of an innovative 'visual autobiography' titled From hieroglyphics to Isotype. After his death, only extracts from the original text appeared in print: as 'From hieroglyphics to Isotypes' [sic] in Future books: the crowded scene (volume III, 1947), heavily edited by Neurath's widow, Marie Neurath, and the film-maker Paul Rotha; and later in Empiricism and sociology, edited by Marie Neurath and Robert S. Cohen (1973).

Otto Neurath initially conceived From hieroglyphics to Isotype as a 'PICTURE BOOK, with a few explanatory notes only', adding that its purpose would be to 'show the different sources from which Isotype has evolved'. He wanted to reveal Isotype's genealogy by penetrating to its roots, looking at heraldic, allegorical, tattoo and playing card symbols; military drawings and battle plans; maps; still and moving photographic images; and projection and perspective presentations - in total, looking at instances of how 'the visual elements of a comprehensive visual language combine'.

Having formulated his intentions, there followed a flurry of writing and research. Neurath collated his ideas by making notes piecemeal on small scraps of paper (above; I.C. 3.2/76), which were stuck together and appended to his first rough draft. He added extensive notes for the book's contents, and long, detailed lists of chapters and of illustrations to be included from his own extensive and rich collection of 18th- and 19th-century ephemera.

Early drafts of Neurath's text received less than favorable criticism from Wolfgang Foges, managing director of the book packager Adprint (handling the book's production), who regarded the text (only half-jokingly) as self-absorbed Isotype propaganda. Neurath was advised to focus on and expand the biographical notes featured in the book's epilogue 'Glimpses at a visual autobiography', and this he did with enthusiasm and aplomb. In subsequent drafts, Neurath thus shifted his emphasis from the evolution of Isotype to a personal exploration of the visual stimuli that had engaged, challenged and influenced his life and work.

To show his conception of the book, Neurath created two mock-ups of it, including a rough cover design (shown at top), exacting page layouts and numerous examples of illustrative material. He composed further extensive and exacting lists of illustrations from books, prints, periodicals and journals for inclusion. Simply put, Neurath wanted it to be a big book 'with lots of pictures'.

Some sixty-five years on, work is now underway to collate the several variant texts of the visual autobiography held in the Otto and Marie Neurath Isotype Collection. The aim is to produce a judiciously edited and well-illustrated edition under the title From hieroglyphics to Isotype: a visual autobiography. Publication by Hyphen Press is planned for 2010. (ME)"

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Neurath
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurath%27s_boat ]
ottoneurath  books  toread  design  hieroglyphics  symbols  visual  via:unthinkingly  maps  mapping  autobiographies  paulrotha  marieneurath  robertcohen  isoptype  shipoftheseus 
december 2013 by robertogreco
RSA - The App Generation: identity, intimacy and imagination in the digital era
"Professor Howard Gardner explores the challenges facing today's young people as they navigate three vital areas of adolescent life - identity, intimacy and imagination - in a digital world. How can we ensure that new technologies act as a springboard to greater creativity and higher aspiration?"

[Direct link to video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTqY-a2kvk8 ]
howardgardner  education  generations  digital  digitalage  2013  creativity  imagination  writing  technology  identity  intimacy  texting  openstudioproject  lcproject  gettinglost  vulnerability  visual  text  graphicarts  empathy  constraints  freedom 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Vision On - Wikipedia
"Vision On was a British children's television programme, shown on BBC1 from 1964 to 1976 and designed specifically for deaf children.

Vision On was conceived and developed by BBC producers Ursula Eason and Patrick Dowling to replace a monthly series For the Deaf, a programme paced slowly enough for children to read captions and subtitles. It was noted in surveys that a favourite for deaf children was Top of the Pops, due to its lively and fast-moving format and the fact that even the profoundly deaf could still enjoy the music's lower frequency notes.

There was initial disagreement as to whether lip-reading or British sign language would be more appropriate. Eventually it was decided that, since the new programme was intended as entertainment rather than education, communication would be entirely visual, the amount of text would be severely limited and, except for a few repeated statements, speech would be abandoned altogether. The title Vision On referred to the illuminated sign in studios indicating that cameras were live. Normally another sign "Sound On" would follow, but the titles for Vision On deliberately omitted this. The programme's logo is made up from the words of the title and its reflection.

The aim of the programme was to entertain but also to encourage imagination, with a fast-paced flow of contrasting ideas, both sane and silly. This mixture was an apparent success as the series ran for twelve years and, while retaining a commitment to the deaf, attracted a wider following and gained several awards including the international Prix Jeunesse and the BAFTA Award for Specialised Programmes."

[See also: http://www.its-prof-again.co.uk/vision_on.htm ]

[via: https://twitter.com/genmon/status/398096251507703808 ]
bbc  television  1960s  1970s  deaf  visionon  ursulaeason  oatrickdowling  children  visual  disability  communication  disabilities 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Inge Druckrey: Teaching to See on Vimeo
Directed and edited by Andrei Severny. Produced by Edward Tufte.

"If you do one thing today, watch this 40-minute crash course in Design Thinking."
FastCompany [ fastcodesign.com/1670615/a-40-minute-crash-course-in-design-thinking ]

"A great story beautifully told."
Ken Carbone, Designer, Chief Creative Director, Carbone Smolan Agency

“This [film] is about patient and dedicated teaching, about learning to look and visualize in order to design, about the importance of drawing. It is one designer’s personal experience of issues that face all designers, expressed with sympathy and encouragement, and illustrated with examples of Inge [Druckrey]’s own work and that of grateful generations of her students. There are simple phrases that give insights into complex matters, for example that letterforms are ‘memories of motion.’ Above all, it is characteristic of Inge that in this examination of basic principles the word “beautiful” is used several times.”
Matthew Carter, type designer, MacArthur Fellow

“This film is absolutely beautiful. I'm so impressed with it and learned so much in such a compact piece. I feel like it picked up where Helvetica left off with the subtle principles of typographical balance and some early history stemming from the human hand. Your wonderful teaching approach comes through loud and clear and stands as an inspiration and model for others including myself. This is fantastic.”
Luke Geissbuhler, Cinematographer of Helvetica and other films

"A great documentation of the visual values we hold dear."
Roger Remington, Vignelli Distinguished Professor of Design, RIT

"A fine, insightful and educational documentary. It captures Inge’s work as a designer and educator, her thinking and her SEEING, in a wonderful and most perfect way. Truly Inspirational!"
Hans-Ulrich Allemann, Designer/Educator
art  video  teaching  graphicdesign  design  yale  ingedruckrey  2012  via:johnpavlus  seeing  noticing  arteducation  education  andreiseverny  edwardtufte  film  visual  herbertmatter  photography  understanding 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Piet (programming language) - Wikipedia
"Piet is an esoteric programming language designed by David Morgan-Mar, whose programs are bitmaps that look like abstract art. The compilation is guided by a "pointer" that moves around the image, from one continuous coloured region to the next. Procedures are carried through when the pointer exits a region.

There are 20 colours for which behaviour is specified: 18 "colourful" colours, which are ordered by a 6-step hue cycle and a 3-step brightness cycle; and black and white which are not ordered. When exiting a "colourful" colour and entering another one, the performed procedure is determined by the number of steps of change in hue and brightness. Black cannot be entered; when the pointer tries to enter a black region, the rules of choosing the next block are changed instead. If all possible rules are tried, the program terminates. Regions outside the borders of the image are also treated as black. White does not perform operations, but allows the pointer to "pass through". The behaviour of colours other than the 20 specified is left to the compiler or interpreter.

Variables are stored in memory as signed integers in a single stack. Most specified procedures deal with operations on that stack, others with input/output and with the rules by which the compilation pointer moves.

Piet was named after the Dutch painter Piet Mondrian. The originally intended name, Mondrian, was already taken."

[See also: http://www.dangermouse.net/esoteric/piet.html and http://www.rapapaing.com/piet/piet.html ]
art  code  coding  computing  visual  color  colors  programming  pietmondrian  piet  edg  srg 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Granary Books - Publisher of Artist's Books
"For nearly thirty years, Granary Books has brought together writers, artists, and bookmakers to investigate verbal/visual relations in the time-honored spirit of independent publishing. Granary's mission—to produce, promote, document, and theorize new works exploring the intersection of word, image, and page—has earned the Press a reputation as one of the most unique and significant small publishers operating today.


Our project has been strengthened by a growing involvement in the organization, preservation, and sale of archives, manuscripts, and rare books by important contemporary writers and artists. While publishing remains central to Granary's purpose, we are also deeply involved with a widespread and local community of writers, poets, and artists. For years Granary occupied a gallery space in Soho, hosting countless public events, lectures, and readings while curating exhibits related to books, book art, poetry, and writing. We believe that Granary's publishing, preservation, and community outreach has significant long-term implications for the fields of writing and book art. Since the mid-nineties Granary has sought to produce, promote, and contextualize scholarship investigating an emerging history of small press publishing, poetry, and artists' books. Many of the books we have produced in this vein, including Johanna Drucker's essential The Century of Artists' Books, Jerome Rothenberg and Steve Clay's A Book of the Book: Some Works & Projections About the Book & Writing, and Steve Clay and Rodney Phillips's A Secret Location on the Lower East Side are now being used as textbooks at the college level, further opening and legitimizing the field for a new generation of scholars and practitioners.

Granary Books remains committed to publishing innovative written and visual work, observing progressive scholarship, and supporting adventurous bookmaking while exploring the relationships between seeing and reading, reading and seeking."
books  publishers  publishing  nyc  bookmaking  art  visual  progressivescholarship  granary  granarybooks  poetry  poets  artists  events  curation  curating  johannadrucker  jeromerothenberg  steveclay  rodenyphillips  artistsbooks  artbooks 
february 2013 by robertogreco
ESTUDIO TRICOTA
"Somos un estudio independiente que busca dar soluciones simples a problemáticas de comunicación visual complejas.

Desarrollamos de esta manera proyectos de identidad corporativa, branding, packaging, tipografía, editorial, web, ilustración y fotografía.

Para esto optamos por resoluciones con economía de recursos encontrando la inspiración fuera del pixel, asumiendo a los avances tecnológicos como una mera herramienta.

Diseñamos basandonos en una marcada aplicación de las formas, buen uso de las familias tipograficas, las paletas de color, la geometría y las estructuras como indispensables para la creación de una pieza gráfica de diseño.

Así mismo nos interesamos en la selección de soportes y materialidades, como en la exploración de técnicas de impresión y post impresión; claves para el acabado de una pieza.

En definitiva, aplicar al diseño contemporáneo nuestra preferencia por la simpleza y la estética vintage."

[via http://cosasvisuales.com/2012/11/23/estudio-tricota/ ]
photography  webdesign  packaging  illustration  typography  visualcommunication  visual  graphicdesign  garphics  design  argentina  palermo  buenosaires  webdev  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Writing Problems of Visual Thinkers
“Visual thinkers have difficulty organizing expository prose because their preferred mode of thought is fundamentally different from the organization of expository prose.” /

“The writing of a visual thinker is like a map of all the possibilities.” /

“Visual thinking allows for many elements to appear at once, simultaneously, interpenetrating with one another, with relationships that may be more evocative than specific.”

“Perhaps writing has been made unnecessarily difficult by the rarely challenged assumption that students should write in a one-dimensional sequence and produce a document composed exclusively of words typed in a uniform typeface.” /

“It is my hunch that people engage in high-speed, multi-channeled fully-verbalized thinking, as well as simultaneous ‘multitasking’ in cryptic forms of verbal thought, nonverbal modalities, and integrated forms of thought. Such a concept challenges current ideas about the limitations of ‘linear’ thought and could revolutionize our idea of where writing starts.”
writing  thinking  via:litherland  visualthinkers  organization  perspective  howwethink  howwewrite  nonverbal  multitaksing  thought  reading  howweread  learning  psychology  visual  cv 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Untitled Project / Siber Art
"The Untitled Project is rooted in an underlying interest in the nature of power. With the removal of all traces of text from the photographs, the project explores the manifestation of power between large groups of people in the form of public and semi-public language. The absence of the printed word not only draws attention to the role text plays in the modern landscape but also simultaneously emphasizes alternative forms of communication such as symbols, colors, architecture and corporate branding. In doing this, it serves to point out the growing number of ways in which public voices communicate without using traditional forms of written language.

The reintroduction of the text takes written language out of the context of its intended viewing environment. The composition of the layouts remain true to the composition of their corresponding photographs in order to draw attention to relative size, location and orientation…"
2010  2002  visual  communication  aworldwithouttext  textless  ads  language  text  advertising  photography  art  mattsiber  words  signs  streets  cities  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
Google Blockly Lets You Hack With No Keyboard | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
"Google has released a completely visual programming language that lets you build software without typing a single character.

Now available on Google Code — the company’s site for hosting open source software — the new language is called Google Blockly, and it’s reminiscent of Scratch, a platform developed at MIT that seeks to turn even young children into programmers.

Like Scratch, Blockly lets you build applications by piecing together small graphical objects in much the same way you’d piece together Legos. Each visual object is also a code object — a variable or a counter or an “if-then” statement or the like — and as you piece them to together, you create simple functions. And as you piece the functions together, you create entire applications — say, a game where you guide a tiny figurine through a maze…

From Google’s site, you can translate Blockly applications into existing languages, including Javascript; Dart, Google new take on Javascript, and Python."
dart  python  javascript  googlecode  scratch  edg  srg  2012  googleblocky  blocky  children  coding  visual  visualprogramminglanguage  programming  google  teaching  from delicious
june 2012 by robertogreco
Dr. Chris Mullen, The Visual Telling of Stories, illustration, design, film, narrative sequences, magazines, books, prints etc
"A lyrical encyclopedia of visual proportions…Rugged design in opposition to elegance…It's bigger than you could ever think—just explore—no clues from me…big letter and no fancy-dan embroidery—on opposition to the fey…"

"This site records a range of material dedicated to the study of the Visual Narrative. The original site, intended by me for part-time students and other interested parties was closed down by the University of Brighton in 2004. I was subsequently denied access to the original images most of which, however, were in my own collection. I have developed the site on a daily basis thereafter. It remains exclusively educational and is in constant use. Many thanks to those in the UK and beyond who shared my irritation at events. Contact me on chris@fulltable.com "
writing  stories  narrativesequences  magazines  narrative  film  treasure  susia  philbeard  rebeccamarywilson  hypertext  ruthrix  janecouldrey  clarestrand  grammercypark  petruccelli  jackiebatey  jaynewilson  dickbriel  chrismullen  america  visual  visualcodes  advertising  comics  classideas  tcsnmy  srg  edg  glossary  reference  books  images  visualization  wcydwt  art  design  illustration  storytelling  via:litherland 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Visipix: Mangas by HOKUSAI, Katsushika (1760 - 1849)
"This started one of the most ambitious projects in art: Teaching us all how to see things with our own eyes

Visipix.com publishes here the complete 15 volumes in facsimile quality. This is a world premiere in the internet

The success of western culture is based on the 'Enlightenment': Think with your own brain, find your religion in your own heart. I go that far: I prefer to be wrong with my own brain - and do my darndest to learn, especially learn from others - than to blindly depend on somebody else's belief. We learn this from Socrates, Luther, Lessing, Kant, Popper and others.]

What the western culture achieved verbally, Hokusai does visually. Artistic genius and wise teachings are well balanced. Nothing could be more difficult."
art  japan  illustration  manga  visual  hokusai  katsushikahokusai  graphic  via:preoccupations  1800s  1700s  noticing  learning  enlightenment  belief  balance  teachings  srg  edg  glvo  from delicious
september 2011 by robertogreco
vizKult vizKult vizKult
"About vizKlut: This panel is part of vizKult, a loose band of artist and writers exploring the ‘cult of vision’. This group explores the ways in which the visual operates in our society and the mechanism which manufacture, shape, and control the world around us. In this sense VizKult’s emphasis is on the process rather than the products of our contemporary visual condition."
vizkult  art  situationist  anarchism  self-education  education  arts  unitaryurbanism  urban  urbanism  nyc  visual  cultofvision  writers  writing  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Short Schrift: The New Liberal Arts: Photography ["Photography is a comprehensive science; photography is a comparative literature."]
"classical liberal arts are arts of the word, products of the book, letter, lecture…Renaissance added plastic arts of painting & sculpture, & modernity those of laboratory…new liberal arts are overwhelmingly arts of the DOCUMENT, & the photograph is the document par excellence.

Like exact sciences, photographic arts are industrial, blurring line btwn knowledge & technology…Like painting & sculpture, they are visual, aesthetic, based in both intuition & craft. Like writing, photography is both an action & an object: writing makes writing & photography makes photography. & like writing, photographic images have their own version of the trivium—a logic, grammar & rhetoric.

We don't only SEE pictures; we LEARN how they're structured & how they become meaningful…

Photography is science of the interrelation & specificity of all of these forms, as well as their reproduction, recontextualization, & redefinition…"
timcarmody  2009  newliberalarts  photography  seeing  intuition  craft  writing  documents  actions  objects  meaning  expressions  communication  logic  grammar  composition  art  visual  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Where Is Art Now? Leaving the art world to decide what art is doesn’t resolve the issue of quality...: Observatory: Design Observer
"we need to put more emphasis again on the visual in art, & it’s clear that many young artists with visual talent have decided to ignore the art world’s weary, self-serving conceptualist strictures & just go ahead and make the art they feel like making. They want to create optical art experiences of their own. By paying too much attention to the extremes of high or low we run the risk of undervaluing what’s happening in the densely populated middle — graphic novels, graphic design, illustration, low-cost film-making — where the expressive possibilities of the visual are still embraced with conviction. This, rather than art scene-mediated art, is the real center of visual culture in our time. Are we overlooking great work only because we have been instructed for so long to assume that anything presented outside the art world’s walls must be inferior?"
art  designobserver  rickpoynor  glvo  visual  conceptualart  graphicnovels  design  illustration  filmmaking  culture  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
collision detection: How Instagram changes the way I look at things
"really deep appeal of Instagram…It changes the way I look at the world around me.

I’m not a super visual person; I do not normally take a lot of photos. But now I am, & do. Whenever you join a new social network, there’s this sudden, gentle pressure to be more interesting. In the case of Twitter…a pressure to post ever-more-cool undiscovered URLage. In the case of Instagram, it means posting ever-more-nifty snapshots. And this in turn means that I’ve begun looking at the world around me anew. I used to walk around my neighborhood blissfully — or stressfully — ignoring my surroundings, while staring at the sidewalk (or, ironically, my iphone). Now I find myself spotting unusual bits of graffiti, or patterns that fall trees make against the sky, or how super strange the robot is on Yo Gabba Gabba when my kids watch in the morning. Or that blue door on the brownstone in the picture above: How did I not notice how pretty it was? It’s like my third eye has opened up!"
attention  instagram  photography  noticing  classideas  details  clivethompson  glvo  lomo  lomography  socialmedia  visual  interestingness  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
bruketa & zinic: kvarner visual identity
"the new visual identity for kvarner county tourism office has been developed by advertising agency bruketa & zinic. throughout history, kvarner located in croatia has been known as an intersection of four transport routes. according to bruketa & zinic, the very name kvarner evokes this quadrant, navigational spatial orientation. this is why the source of this visual identity proposal begins with the familiar symbol of the wind rose, which also includes references to navigation, four-sided spatial orientation and wind direction. this motif is then divided into simple geometrical visual elements, their simple forms and colors creating a kind of 'toolbox' for further development of the visual identity of the kvarner region and each one of its individual parts."
relationships  evolvinglogos  design  identity  graphics  logos  branding  croatia  spatial  navigation  geometry  visual 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Neography [iPhone, iPad] - "Words separate, pictures unite" /by Thibault Geffroy | CreativeApplications.Net
"“Words separate, pictures unite” (Otto Neurath) is the moto of Neography, a personal project by Thibault Geffroy. By reflection on the evolution of the transmission of news information, the ‘soon to be released’ apps for iPhone and iPad will atempt to enable readers to access the latest news quickly through a system of signs and images (RSS reader?). Neography, Thibault describes, builds on the growing interest in data visualization by allowing the coexistence of pictographic symbols of the alphabet, with photo montages to create a kind of a visual riddle. The project is an experimental response in the form and content, a screen … to regain the power of the image.

Newspapers, rarely read.
Covers, only glanced at.
Websites, always surfed through.
Takeover of the text, submission of the reader.
Passivity is the keyword in our time-urgent world.
Now is the moment to use new visual media to reawaken the basic thirst for information that has been lost.
Experiment in form and content on the front page and on screen where the world —without word—comes directly to the eyes."

[http://notgames.tumblr.com/post/773505943/newspapers-rarely-read-covers-only-glanced-at ]
iphone  ipad  applications  reading  interactivity  passive  books  print  newspapers  games  gaming  videogames  touch  screens  interface  engagement  newmedia  information  2010  experimental  visual  passivity  ios 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Omoby: Visual Search for the iPhone
"Omoby can essentially be summed up in four words: Google Goggles for iPhone. The visual search app allows you to snap a pic of any object and get back a list of convenient search results, retailer pricing, and information about that product.
iphone  search  mobile  visual  augmentedreality  api  omoby  applications  via:jessebrand  ios  ar 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Temple Grandin: The world needs all kinds of minds | Video on TED.com
"Temple Grandin, diagnosed with autism as a child, talks about how her mind works -- sharing her ability to "think in pictures," which helps her solve problems that neurotypical brains might miss. She makes the case that the world needs people on the autism spectrum: visual thinkers, pattern thinkers, verbal thinkers, and all kinds of smart geeky kids."
autism  ted  templegrandin  learning  understanding  language  nonverbal  visual  patterns  verbal  neuroscience  tcsnmy 
february 2010 by robertogreco
BBC - BBC Internet Blog: A new global visual language for the BBC's digital services
"About 2 years ago, after printing out the site onto what has now become jokingly known as the 'Wall of Shame' we decided to embark on an ambitious project, called Global Visual Language 2.0, with the aim of unifying the visual and interaction design of bbc.co.uk and the mobile website. ... We've lived with and loved the distinctly 'web 2.0' design for a while now and it's done us proud. However, time's moved on, and in autumn last year we decided it was time to resurrect the project. We set out to broaden our ambitions; to create a design philosophy and world-class design standards that all designers across the business could adhere to. We wanted to find the soul of the BBC. We wanted something distinctive and recognisable; we wanted drama. We knew whatever we created needed to be truly cross-platform and that we needed to simplify our user journeys."
bbc  typography  design  webdev  branding  research  language  redesign  grids  webdesign  web2.0  visual  ux  ui  layout  web  styleguides 
february 2010 by robertogreco
RE<ORDS Discography
"A Japanese independent+ record label +ha+ jus+ exis+s in iPhone/iPodTouch."
applications  iphone  music  interface  sound  records  visual  ios 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Spotlight on DML | Promising Evidence for Using Immersive Games in Classrooms
"SMALLab is a mixed-reality platform for learning. It is grounded in the belief that learning is effective when it is embodied (that is, engaging the body and mind in learning), multimodal (visual, sonic, kinesthetic), and collaborative.

Like the Wii, SMALLab moves students beyond the desktop and into a hybrid physical-digital environment. Students and teachers interact with digital elements via full body movements and gestures in real 3D space." [Includes video depicting the system]
smalllab  learning  collaboration  engagement  embodiment  immersive  play  education  visual  movement  immersivegames  kinesthetic  motion  math  chemistry  physics  science  languagearts  poetry 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Design Fiction: ETech 2009
"Design is a kind of authoring practice, crafting material visions of different kinds of possible worlds. Design’s various ways of articulating ideas in material to create social objects and experiences can be seen as a kind of practice close to writing fiction. This is a presentation about the relationship between design, science fiction and the material elements that help tell visual stories about the future — mostly props and special effects.

The questions here are this: How does design participate in shaping possible near future worlds? How does the integration of story telling, technology, art and design provide opportunities to re-imagine how the world may be in the future?"
julianbleecker  etech  2009  design  storytelling  socialobjects  imagination  future  visual 
january 2009 by robertogreco
This Is How We Dream, Parts 1 & 2 | Welcome to NCS-Tech!
"It is fitting because as you will see in this video, Dr. Miller’s message is about something new as well, what he calls the “new humanities,” the technology-fueled convergence of visual, audible, textual and informatical literacies that represent, in his view, the future of human communication. A future, indeed, for which we are not prepared, largely because no pedagogies exist to teach it."
via:hrheingold  teaching  pedagogy  universities  colleges  books  humanities  change  future  literacy  research  libraries  reading  writing  communication  multimedia  reform  information  visual  audio  technology 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The Anti-Advertising Agency » Demand a Read/Write City
"Why is read/write better? Because you can consume, process, and respond. This is how we think critically. This is how we learn. You can talk back. You can express yourself. You don’t just consume expression, you create expression.
advertising  engagement  democracy  graffiti  activism  streetart  cities  urban  urbanism  culture  politics  marketing  art  visual  speech  city 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Wordle - Beautiful Word Clouds
"toy for generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text. You can tweak your clouds with different fonts, layouts, and color schemes. The images you create
visualization  tagclouds  tags  tagging  visual  del.icio.us  text  language  mapping  maps  words 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Getty images moodstream - data visualization & visual design - information aesthetics
"visual "brainstorming tool" specifically designed to take people in inspiring, unexpected directions. visitors can create a series of "moodboards" that consist of a customized soundtrack & the rapid sequence of Getty images & videos, based on sliders des
moods  music  photography  visualization  images  visual  infographics 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Viewzi — What are you looking for?
"Viewzi is a whole new way to experience search. Instead of one big list, you get nice visual Views tailored for the content you are looking for"
search  visual  visualization 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Conceptual Trends and Current Topics - Tools for Vizuality
"As they do we will march from literacy to vizuality. In order to complete that great transition, we'll need a whole suite of tools, like these first primitive ones above, which permit us to manipulate, manage, store, cite and create moving images as easi
annotation  film  hypertext  media  movies  tagging  technology  video  visual  kevinkelly  literacy  visualliteracy 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Evolution Robotics: Robotics - ViPR - Visual Pattern Recognition is a Vision Solution for Cell Phone Cameras and Loss Prevention
"Evolution Robotics ViPR (visual pattern recognition) technology provides a reliable and robust vision solution that truly gives electronic devices the ability to detect and recognize complex visual patterns - in effect, to see."
robotics  vision  recognition  search  sensing  software  images  mobile  visual 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Is Knowledge Representation Becoming More Visual? | Knowledge Matters
"I think knowledge representation is becoming more visual, but I don’t see visualisations replacing the written word, music notation, or numbers. Rather I see visualisations as an adjunct to these artefacts."
knowledge  communication  visualization  visual  writing  graphs  charts  infographics  information  representation 
april 2008 by robertogreco
MIT Media Lab: Reality Mining
"Reality Mining defines the collection of machine-sensed environmental data pertaining to human social behavior. This new paradigm of data mining makes possible the modeling of conversation context, proximity sensing, and temporospatial location throughou

[see also: http://www.technologyreview.com/read_article.aspx?ch=specialsections&sc=emerging08&id=20247]
attention  culture  technology  phones  realitymining  reality  memory  location-based  privacy  future  data  context  research  social  mobile  datamining  networks  MIT  modeling  networking  psychogeography  pervasive  context-aware  crowds  behavior  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  mobilecomputing  mobility  location  locative  compsci  psychology  socialgraph  surveillance  statistics  visualization  visual  spatial  medialab  mapping  ai  mitmedialab 
april 2008 by robertogreco
The History of Visual Communication
"attempts to walk you through the long and diverse history of a particular aspect of human endeavour: The translation of ideas, stories and concepts that are largely textual and/or word based into a visual format, i.e. visual communication."
aesthetics  anthropology  architecture  art  books  communication  caves  craft  creative  culture  design  drawing  graphics  history  icons  illustration  infodesign  infographics  information  visual  visualization  via:kottke  typography  type  toread  painting  memory  photography  print  printing  literature  technology  words  writing  process  reference 
february 2008 by robertogreco
EveryScape
"EveryScape isn't an online world, it's the world online. EveryScape takes you from the streets to the sidewalks and through the doors of the world's cities and tours. Letting businesses organizations and consumers build and share their world the way they
maps  mapping  photography  virtualworlds  virtual  urbanism  travel  tourism  visualization  visual  geotagging  collaborative  location  locative  local  navigation  360  3d  buildings  cities  collaboration  internet  online  webapps 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Visual dictionary
"to learn by way of image with thematic, clear and precise pages, with concise and rigorous texts, bilingual, the InfoVisual will become a academic resource. Different from an encyclopedia or from a traditional online dictionaries, thesauri and glossaries
dictionary  language  visualization  visual  diagrams  graphics  medical  encyclopedias  anatomy  biology  dictionaries 
january 2008 by robertogreco
malwarez cyber threats - data visualization & visual design - information aesthetics
"series of visualization of worms, viruses, trojans and spyware code. for each piece of disassembled code, API calls, memory addresses and subroutines are tracked and analyzed. their frequency, density and grouping are mapped to the inputs of an algorithm
visualization  worms  viruses  spyware  code  visual  information  infographics 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Visualizing: tracing an aesthetics of data - we make money not art
"Last November, i spent a few days in Madrid to get a sneak peak at the Visualizar workshop at Medialab Prado. The projects that came out of the workshop are quite interesting and i'm currently interviewing some of the project leaders to get more insight
visualization  information  data  maps  mapping  charts  datavisualization  design  graphics  infographics  visual 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Mindomo - Web-based mind mapping software
"Mindomo is a versatile Web-based mind mapping tool, delivering the capabilities of desktop mind mapping software in a Web browser - with no complex software to install or maintain."
charts  collaboration  collaborative  diagrams  drawing  mindmap  mindmapping  notes  organization  onlinetoolkit  visualization  visual 
december 2007 by robertogreco
foreign exchange "gaming" - data visualization & visual design - information aesthetics
"Forex Marathon", users can pick a currency & have it compete in a foot race against others. in "Globe Trader", trading portfolio is managed by forging relations with other currencies on world map. in "Forex Match" 2 currencies go one-on-one in a tug of r
games  visualization  finance  money  gaming  data  visual  infographics  information 
november 2007 by robertogreco
+zero – a rede é o perder-se
"entendendo as experiências que envolvem o áudio visual como sendo constituídas, centralmente, por linguagens híbridas, sendo portanto índices da contemporaneidade, o projeto +zero pretende incorporar signos áudio verbo visuais em estruturas labirí
art  audio  visual  programming  processing  interactive  interaction  coding  visualization  audiovisual  interface  media  internet  video 
november 2007 by robertogreco
A Tourist of the Everyday - Dwell Blog - dwell.com
"1x/week Kate leaves directions on telephone hotline telling how to find offbeat attractions in SF area. 3-4 times/year leads bus trips called Mundane Journeys...drops passengers at locations with handouts instructing them to admire sidewalk markings, cha
sanfrancisco  books  tours  travel  cities  experience  visual  senses  social  local  urban  place  color  glvo  gamechanging  fieldtrips  lcproject  katepocrass  vacation  walking  illustration  events  california  art 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Mundane Journeys: Field Guide to Color. by Pocrass, Kate. : William Stout Architectural Books
"San Francisco, 2007 San Francisco guide book. Kate Pocrass has distilled the unique beauty of San Francisco in astonishingly poetic moments of bliss, sensuality, and wonder. Destined to become a classic."
sanfrancisco  books  tours  travel  cities  experience  visual  senses  social  local  urban  place  color  glvo  gamechanging  fieldtrips  lcproject  katepocrass  vacation  walking  illustration  events  california  art 
november 2007 by robertogreco
things magazine - We are sliding towards an irreversible obsession with totally visual communication
"Only dense, layered, information-rich text cuts it in the online world, preferably broken up with images and other information, which might explain why the blog form, in particular the visual blog, is currently so successful."
online  internet  culture  web  curation  images  visual  text  information  gamechanging  attention  ffffound  communication  collecting 
november 2007 by robertogreco
StarLogo TNG
"StarLogo TNG is The Next Generation of StarLogo modeling and simulation software. While this version holds true to the premise of StarLogo as a tool to create and understand simulations of complex systems, it also brings with it several advances. Through
starlogo  software  scratch  visualization  programming  kids  children  learning  education  languages  opensource  osx  linux  windows  mac  coding  technology  visual  games  gaming  graphics  interaction  simulations  language  teaching  logo 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Exploratree - Exploratree by FutureLab
"Exploratree is a free web resource where you can download, use and make your own interactive thinking guides. Thinking guides can support independent and group research projects with frameworks for thinking, planning and enquiry. We’ve provided a set o
elearning  free  freeware  onlinetoolkit  mapping  mindmap  mindmapping  maps  planning  productivity  thinking  visualization  webapps  learning  whiteboards  visual  collaboration 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Historical Anatomies on the Web: Browse Titles
"Images have been selected from the following anatomical atlases in the National Library of Medicine's collection. Each atlas is linked to a brief Author & Title Description, which offers an historical discussion of the work, its author, the artists, and
human  anatomy  science  glvo  images  visual  books  drawings  diagrams  libraries  graphics  history  medicine  archives  biology  body  collections  bodies 
october 2007 by robertogreco
eidetic: Definition and Much More from Answers.com
"Of, relating to, or marked by extraordinarily detailed and vivid recall of visual images."
words  language  english  memory  visual  photography  visualization 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Semaphore - Wikipedia
"The semaphore or optical telegraph is an apparatus for conveying information by means of visual signals, with towers with pivoting blades or paddles, shutters, in a matrix, or hand-held flags etc. Information is encoded by the position of the mechanical
communication  history  visual  technology  information  symbols  flags 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Data Visualization: Modern Approaches
"Let’s take a look at the most interesting modern approaches to data visualization as well as related articles, resources and tools."
infographics  infodesign  information  graphic  graphics  webdesign  visualization  visual  usability  timelines  networks  images  data  graphs  presentations  mindmap  media  diagrams  charts  interactive  webdev 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Enzo Mari / 25/25 - Celebrating 25 Years of Design : Product + Furniture Designer (1932-) - Design/Designer Information
"One of the most thoughtful and intellectually provocative Italian designers of the late 20th century, ENZO MARI (1932-) has proved as influential to younger generations of designers as to his peers as a writer, teacher, artist and designer of products, f
enzomari  design  toys  products  games  furniture  puzzles  italy  visual  teaching  learning 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Dandelife.com : A Social Biography Network.
"Dandelife is a place for you to record the events of your life, past and present, public and private. Have you photos and videos online in different places? No worries. Like you, your Dandelife is ultimate mash-up. Live well - we're listening!"
aggregator  timelines  time  blogging  blogs  collaboration  collaborative  community  data  del.icio.us  flickr  folksonomy  history  infographics  personal  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  visualization  visual 
july 2007 by robertogreco
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