robertogreco + via:migurski   119

Feminism for Men | Floyd Dell | The Baffler
“The change is already under way. Irresistible economic forces are taking more and more women every year out of the economic shelter of the home into the great world, making them workers and earners along with men. And every conquest of theirs, from an education which will make them fit for the world of earning, to “equal pay for equal work,” is a setting free of men. The last achievement will be a social insurance for motherhood, which will enable them to have children without taking away a man’s freedom from him. Then a man will be able to tell his employer that “he and his job can go bark at one another,” without being a hero and a scoundrel at the same time.

Capitalism will not like that. Capitalism does not want free men. It wants men with wives and children who are dependent on them for support. Mothers’ pensions will be hard fought for before they are ever gained. And that is not the worst.

Men don’t want the freedom that women are thrusting upon them. They don’t want a chance to be brave. They want a chance to be generous. They want to give food and clothes and a little home with lace curtains to some woman.

Men want the sense of power more than they want the sense of freedom.”
politics  baffler  essay  freedom  1914  bravery  men  gender  feminism  power  economics  floyddell  via:migurski 
april 2014 by robertogreco
What Tech Hasn’t Learned From Urban Planning - NYTimes.com
“SAN FRANCISCO — The tech sector is, increasingly, embracing the language of urban planning — town hall, public square, civic hackathons, community engagement. So why are tech companies such bad urbanists?



Gone also is any sign of life the plaza ever had. Google leased as much of the complex as it could get its hands on — and the correspondingly skyrocketing rents accelerated the closing of all the ground-floor businesses, even a short-lived outpost of The Melt (a franchise that serves uniformly grilled sandwiches made with a high-tech — and tech-industry-financed — piece of machinery). In place of Starbucks there is now something called the Mozilla Community Space — that isn’t open to the community. You need to be a registered “Mozillian” (whatever that is) to gain access.

Tech companies that remain in the suburbs are taking a similarly upside-down approach to urbanism. Facebook’s Menlo Park campus, set in a sea of parking, is a sort of movie-set version of a city, with cafe, dry cleaner, doctor, dentist and personal trainers all accessible only to employees. Informal public gathering places (like Starbucks, for example, or a barbershop) are essential to local democracy and community vitality. But by creating “third places” (home and work are the first and second) that aren’t actually open to the public, that benefit is severely compromised.

“Community space” implies something that is open to, well, the community. Subverting of naming conventions to suggest public access and transparency, while providing neither, is troubling and increasingly pervasive. But this turning inward, despite the incessant drumbeat of “community,” is quickly becoming the rule rather than the exception.”
urbanism  city  cities  google  twitter  sanfrancisco  lament  spur  community  architecture  planning  technology  siliconvalley  janejacobs  isolation  communities  commons  2013  via:migurski 
december 2013 by robertogreco
March on Washington lessons: Four ways to beat 'The Man' - CNN.com
“1. Don't get seduced by spontaneity

Spontaneity is sexy. The urge to act on an irrepressible urge can inspire others. A Tunisian street vendor who set himself on fire is credited with starting the Arab Spring. And who can forget the lone man who stood in front of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square during the pro-democracy protests in China in 1989? … Yet spontaneity is overrated, some observers say. Successful movements are built on years of planning, trial and error, honing strategies for change. A good movement should already have an organizational structure set up to take advantage of a spontaneous act that grips the public.

2. Make policy, not noise

They gave the nation a nifty slogan: "We are the 99%.'' But they haven't been heard from much since. Remember Occupy Wall Street? In 2011, a group of protesters occupied a park in New York City's financial district to protest income inequality and the growing power of financial institutions. … Successful movements just don't take it to the streets. They elect candidates, pass laws, set up institutions to raise money, train people and produce leaders, observers say. The March on Washington, for example, had the charisma of King. But it also had the organizational genius of Bayard Rustin, a man whose attention to detail was so keen that people wryly noted he knew precisely how many portable toilets 250,000 marchers needed.

3. Redefine the meaning of punishment

On July 6, 1892, 300 armed detectives confronted a group of unionized steelworkers who had been locked out of a steel mill in Homestead, Pennsylvania. The workers, who were striking for better wages at a time when people routinely worked 12-hour-per-day, six-day weeks, fought back with stones and guns. They eventually forced the armed detectives to surrender. Three workers and seven detectives died. That confrontation is now known as the Homestead Strike. … Consider the gay and lesbian movement for equality. Palmer, author of "Healing the Heart of Democracy," says that for years, many gay and lesbians suffered in silence as people denigrated their humanity. That changed when a critical mass decided that the pain of "behaving on the outside in a way that contradicts the truth" that they held inside was too much. "They redefined punishment," Palmer says.

4. Divide the elites

It's easy to demonize "The Man" if you're talking with friends in a late-night dorm room rap session. But you're going to need "The Man" if you're going to beat "The Man," some historians say. … A movement, though, can't appeal to the altruism of elites to get their support. Elites help movements when they feel their own interests are threatened, says Pizzigati, author of "The Rich Don't Always Win." That cold calculus among the rich is what made the New Deal possible, he says.”
politics  history  change  elite  occupy  activism  theoryofchange  changemaking  2013  spontaneity  policy  via:migurski 
august 2013 by robertogreco
future shock - bookforum.com / current issue
“Fixing government” for Newsom and Brand means getting rid of its vast bureaucracy. But if the Tea Partiers, steeped in Ayn Rand, want to dismantle government bureaucracy because they hate government, Newsom and Brand want to dismantle it simply because they have the tools to do it. And this is where Newsom’s tract moves beyond mere callow publishing opportunism into a broader, more pernicious rejection of progressive ideas. The purely formal urge to overhaul government along notionally digital lines is a manifestation of what I call “solutionism”—a tendency to justify reforms of social and political institutions by invoking the easy availability of powerful technological fixes rather than by engaging in a genuine analysis of what, if anything, is ailing those institutions and how to fix it.

Solutionists are not interested in investigating the subtle but constitutive roles of supposed vices like bureaucracy, opacity, or inefficiency in enabling liberal subjects to pursue their own life projects. Solutionists simply want to eliminate those vices—and the institutions that produce them—because technology permits them to do so. In his discussion of bureaucracy, for example, Newsom doesn’t even bother with the standard Weberian explanation that bureaucracy is a decidedly modernist institution for minimizing nepotism and introducing some fairness and neutrality to public administration. Instead, he simply views bureaucracy as a consequence of inadequate technology, concluding that better technology will allow us to get rid of it altogether—and why shouldn’t we?

“Our government is clogged with a dense layer of bureaucracy,” he complains. “It’s like a clay layer, a filler that serves only to slow everything down. But technology can get rid of that clay layer by making it possible for people to bypass the usual bureaucratic morass.” In a very limited sense, Newsom is right: Modern technology does allow us to bypass “the usual bureaucratic morass.” But to fail to examine why that morass exists and simply proceed to eliminate it because we have the technology is to fall for a very narrow-minded, regressive, and (paradoxically enough) antimodern kind of solutionism.
evgenymorozov  gavinnewson  scathing  review  book  solutionism  california  technology  government  bureaucracy  democracy  stewartbrand  californianideology  via:migurski  books  teaparty  clayshirky  timoreilly  dontapscott  kevinkelly  estherdyson  longnow 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The challenge of developing a capability | rc3.org
"Often it’s the case that the larger (or older) an organization is, the tougher it is to add a capability in the first place. It’s harder to teach 100 developers to use Test Driven Development and rely on continuous integration rather than traditional QA testing than it is to teach 5. It’s also harder for larger, older, or more conservative organizations to rely on a new capability that has been developed. It often happens that organizations put a lot of work into developing a new capability but they never really get comfortable enough to let it replace an old one.

If nothing else, when you’re discussing projects, it’s worthwhile to ask yourself whether the project leverages an existing capability or requires developing a new one, and planning accordingly. If a new capability is required, both the effort and the risk of failure rise significantly. I’d be willing to bet that Chinese aircraft carrier is never put into active deployment."
aircraftcarriers  china  risk  learning  capabilities  scale  size  organizations  change  via:migurski  from delicious
november 2012 by robertogreco
Brooklyn Hacker • What A Hacker Learns After A Year In Marketing
"A year ago last Friday I left eight years cutting code and plumbing servers to take my very first marketing job.   Prior to then and even before in college and high school, hard skills were what paid my bills - technical work building stuff mostly for the Internet.  Everything I had done up until last year required only the soft skills needed to send a group email or interview a candidate, certainly a pittance to those required to craft a message and get it in front of an audience.

I knew I needed more than that.  While I was at Boxee working for Avner Ronen I made the determination that I wanted the CEO role for my startup.  Like a lot of folks who spend their career in the high risk, high reward, high laughs world of early stage tech, I’ve long held my own entrepreneurial ambitions, but after working for a programmer-turned-head-honcho, I came around to the notion I could make a greater contribution to that endeavor by pushing the vision and the culture rather than the technology and architecture.  I didn’t want to be the technical co-founder - I wanted to run the circus.

But, I was sorely deficient.  Sales and marketing were skills I just didn’t have and were I to ask others to entrust their livelihoods and their families in such an enterprise, it would be incumbent upon me to learn.  To do such a thing with a knowledge base very nearly zero would just be irresponsible.

So, to get some of those skills while keeping my technical chops up, I hopped onboard Twilio as a developer evangelist.  Like a lot of companies, Twilio’s devangelism program is under the marketing aegis and the gig meant working for one of the best marketers I knew.  I’d still write code, but would do so surrounded by the thoroughly unfamiliar context of message craft and story telling. And through the daily demands of the job and the proximity of those who do it well hopefully I’d learn a thing or two about this marketing thing and ultimately serve those I wish to lead better.

Holy biscuits - did I learn plenty.  A year in, I thought it might be helpful to my fellow developers to share what it’s like to turn to the Dark Side and what I picked up in the process."
marketing  engineering  skills  business  twilio  growth  learning  robspectre  2012  charisma  sales  via:migurski 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Who Needs ACORN?
"But unlike African Americans or college students, WVWV targets were not geographically clustered in specific neighborhoods whose sidewalks could be stalked by clipboard-carrying canvassers. Gardner knew she would have to seek them out individually, but it wasn’t obvious how to do that: Databases used by campaigns and parties usually included voters’ ages and flagged them by race, but did not identify their marital status. But Gardner happened to be launching her new group just as the political world was discovering the value of commercial data warehouses initially created for credit agencies and consumer marketing. She bought lists of all voting-age adults and then cross-referenced them with voter-registration rolls: The names that appeared on one and not the other became a potential universe of targets. She then had analysts develop statistical models that mined demographic variables for each woman on that list to predict the likelihood that each was unmarried. Women’s Voices Women’s Vote didn’t have to wait for these voters to come to them. They sent the women on their list a letter.

During campaign years, the group issues quarterly mailings.* Each mailing has a randomized experimental design built in, allowing the group to test various ways of packaging a registration form, adjusting everything from cover letter language to envelope typography. By paying the postal service to track which of its forms were sent along to registration authorities, it is possible to determine which packages get the best response. In a 2010 test, for example, WVWV found that Ohio-specific forms sent to targets in that state got returned at a rate 1 percentage point higher than a standardized national alternative. Analysts can also apply statistical models to identify the attributes of those recipients who have been most responsive to each appeal. With time, WVWV learned that those who have recently moved, or just turned 18, are twice as likely to respond to any mailed registration appeal as the broader population.

After the group’s June 2012 mailing, WVWV analysts and designers made 13 improvements to the way it builds a list of new targets.* Each was designed to slightly increase the odds of response, and thus lower the cost of a registering a voter. A decade of such tests and tweaks has cut the price of a new registration more than half from the $15 that Gardner estimated it cost a decade ago to administer traditional site-based programs using paid canvassers. “We have kept driving the cost of registering a person down cycle after cycle,” she says. “Our lists are getting better, our models are getting better, our targeting is getting better.” With that data-centric approach came something unimaginable at the card table: the ability to put on the rolls only those people you wanted to see cast a ballot.*"
vote  participation  vip  voting  politics  statistics  acorn  vpc  via:migurski 
august 2012 by robertogreco
On September 7th, 1982, Ogilvy sent the following... - Preoccupations-on-Tumblr
“On September 7th, 1982, Ogilvy sent the following internal memo to all agency employees, titled “How to Write”: The better you write, the higher you go in Ogilvy & Mather. People who think well, write well. Woolly minded people write woolly memos, woolly letters and woolly speeches. Good writing is not a natural gift. You have to learn to write well. Here are 10 hints: 1. Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times. 2. Write the way you talk. Naturally. 3. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs. 4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize, demassification, attitudinallyy, judgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass. 5. Never write more than two pages on any subject. 6. Check your quotations. 7. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning – and then edit it. 8. If it is something important, get a colleague to improve it. 9. Before you send your letter or your memo, make sure it is crystal clear what you want the recipient to do. 10. If you want ACTION, don’t write. Go and tell the guy what you want. David”
via:Preoccupations  writing  ogilvy  communication  tips  clarity  via:migurski 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Sorting and searching at the library
"If you ever want to screw over a library, just walk up to any shelf, pick up any book, and put it on another shelf where it doesn’t belong.

Eventually a librarian will stumble across it, see that it’s out of place, and pull it off the shelf. Until then, that book is hopelessly lost. It might as well be on the surface of the moon. Finding a needle in a haystack is easy. When it comes down to it, needles are not hay. Finding one book lost among a million other books? That’s hard.

The only reason such a thing as a library is possible is that it is a gigantic, life-sized, walk-in data structure, tuned for fast lookup.

This post is about searching and sorting, two fundamental aspects of data processing, and what the library has to teach us about them."
sort  code  library  books  search  mergesort  algorithm  quicksort  via:migurski 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The Sociological Eye: DRUG BUSINESS IS NOT THE KEY TO GANGS AND ORGANIZED CRIME: WITH A PROGNOSIS FOR THE MEXICAN CARTEL WARS
"Mafia organization dates from 1931 when Lucky Luciano set up the Commission, and its period of greatest dominance was in the 40 years after the end of Prohibition.

The Mafia families in Sicily, from their reestablishment after the fall of the Fascist regime in World War II through their demise in the 1990s, were involved in what Diego Gambetta [1993] calls the business of protection. In the absence of government regulation and in at atmosphere of pervasive distrust, all economic transactions needed a protector or guarantor, and this was provided by traditional secret societies of "men of honor" who received payoffs in return. The scope of businesses under Mafia protection was even wider than in the U.S., and consisted more of legal activities than illegal ones-- gambling was not prominent in Sicily, though an illegal source of income was smuggling cigarettes to avoid taxation, and turfs for pickpocket gangs were enforced in Palermo. Sicilian Mafia families did become important pipelines for heroin processing and smuggling from the Middle-East across the Atlantic. But this was not the key to the Sicilian Mafias; they existed long before the heroin trade, and their protection business remained centered on the local economy.



Symbol-based Alliances and Multi-gang Alliances: Diplomatic Peace Treaties

These are loose, horizontal alliances between gangs who adopt the same symbols. Symbol-based gangs, with their distinctive gang colors and signs (hand gestures, ways of strutting, etc.) are diplomatic peace treaties among those who belong. Instead of every local gang being the enemy of every other, half the gangs they encounter may be their allies. It is suggestive that the cities with the highest homicide rates--- Detroit, Baltimore, Philadelphia-- have no little structure beyond small gangs fighting each other every few blocks.



In Mexico, when increased border surveillance cut into drug deliveries to the US, crime-orgs expanded into extortion and kidnapping for ransom. The Zetas, because of their organization as Special Forces, were less directly connected with the drug business itself; when they became independent of the declining Gulf cartel, they have moved aggressively into more purely predatory use of violence against other cartels' territories. This is not so much an effort to monopolize the drug trafficking business, as a different political strategy, leveraging their special skill, highly trained military violence.

It follows that ending the illegal drug business-- whether by eradication or by legalization-- would not automatically end violence. Mexican crime-orgs could intensify other types of violent extortion (and so they have, with increased pressure on the US border), as along as they still held territories out of government control; and wars between the cartels would not cease. It is a non sequitur to argue that if the US would stop drug consumption, Mexican cartels and their violence would disappear."
drugs  gangs  violence  sociology  anthropology  history  mexico  via:migurski  mafia  policy  foreignpolicy 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Save the planet — ban cycle helmets | Adrian Short
"Here’s the safety strategy: Make it less safe and make it feel less safe. The best way to make cycling less safe is for cyclists to ride faster. Encourage this wherever possible. Forget ambling, casual, pedestrian images of cycling. Emphasise sport, fitness, competition. Measure speed. Sell speedometers and odometers. Get people to monitor their performance. Track their MPH, their heartrates, their calories, their carbon footprints. Compare with others. Compete. Idolise road racers, couriers, extreme mountain bikers, BMXers. Alleycatters. Lance Armstrong. Jump the red light. Race other cyclists. Race cars. Race the clock. Race, race. It’s not fun unless you’re taking risks. Life is one big risk, right? Cycling just got a whole lot more dangerous for the sake of a marginal shortening of the average journey. Ohh, wipeout. Nice one.

Now the perception of safety. Talk about safety, safety, safety so everyone thinks danger, danger, danger. Don’t show images of cyclists without helmets, especially not children. Never children. Sending your children out on bikes without helmets is tantamount to child abuse. Don’t you care? Don’t you care about the children? Would you send them out to their deaths? Photos of cyclists without helmets are like images of people with cigarettes. Historical documents. Anachronisms. Forbidden outside the intellectual safety of the academy. Be safe, be seen. Hi viz. Yellow jacket, yellow jersey. £100 lights that can dazzle shipping 20 miles off the coast. Lumens. Got to get more lumens. You need a bell? You need a foghorn. Radar. Missiles, if you could get them. And you need training, because it’s a war out there. Drivers hate you. Pedestrians hate you. Other cyclists hate you. The law is indifferent, the police don’t care. Every other road user will kill you if they get a chance. Unless you get trained. Unless you can stay one step ahead of them. Unless you can get them first. So you go to boot camp. You get trained. You are approved. You are a Cyclist. You feel a little bit safer in that dangerous place. Until you see the ghost bike. Don’t be a statistic like the pallid, mangled wreck chained to the lamppost at the roundabout. Don’t be a victim. Go faster. Be a winner. Beat them.

Do you smell? People shouldn’t smell. If you cycle, if you cycle fast, you’ll smell. You’ll need a shower. Does your workplace have showers? No? Don’t cycle. Does the pub have showers? No? Don’t cycle. Does the shopping centre have showers? No? Please, don’t cycle."
biking  law  transportation  bikes  safety  perception  advertising  marketing  helmets  via:migurski 
august 2012 by robertogreco
It’s You | KAROLINA SOBECKA
It’s You is an interactive storefront-window projection that explores the mechanisms of public behaviors and the line between the real and constructed social actions.

The installation is a rear projection on large storefront window. Human figures crowd around something that they obscure from the pedestrian’s view. When the pedestrian stands behind them, as if to look over their shoulders, they step aside to allow him a view onto what they’re looking at. The pedestrian can now see part of the unfolding scene, and he obscures the view for the other pedestrians; he’s become part of the crowd.

When the pedestrian enters the interaction area in front of the window, the projected figures turn their heads glancing at him.
If the pedestrian stops, they will move aside, parting enough to allow him a view onto what they’re looking at.

After the pedestrian has been in the interaction area for a period of time, the projected figures will turn their attention to him. The viewer becomes the performer. If he does something to entertain his viewers, the projected figures will react by clapping, applauding the performance and clarifying their role of audience.
art  projection  zero1  via:migurski 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Albion's Seed Review
"Fischer's basic thesis is that although less than 20% of the present U.S. population has British antecedents, our British genesis is still the dominant factor determining our culture. This formative British culture, however, was not monolithic. America still reflects the regional, religious, and class divisions of 17th and 18th century Britain.

According to Fischer, the foundation of American culture was formed from four mass emigrations from four different regions of Britain by four different socio-religious groups. New England's constitutional period occurred between 1629 and 1640 when Puritans, most from East Anglia, settled there. The next mass migration was of southern English cavaliers and their servants to the Chesapeake Bay region between 1640 and 1675. Then, between 1675 and 1725 thousands of Quakers, led by William Penn settled the Delaware Valley. Finally, English, Scots, and Irish from the borderlands settled in Appalachia between 1717 and 1775. Each of these migrations produced a distinct regional culture which can still be seen in America today.



Whether or not Professor Fischer provides the right answers, he has asked the right questions. To finish enumerating the accomplishments of the book, probably the work's greatest asset is that it asks the right questions. The author asks, "Where do we come from? Who are we? Where are we going?" To be useful, history should ask the big questions, the questions of collective identity and purpose, Asking the right questions is half the battle."
book  review  history  england  albion  culture  race  america  via:migurski 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Pinterest and Feminism » Cyborgology
We can view Pinterest from “dominance feminist” and “difference feminist” perspectives to both highlight this major division within feminist theory as well as frame the debate about Pinterest itself. Secondly, the story being told about Pinterest in general demonstrates the “othering” of women. Last, I’d like to ask for more examples to improve this as a lesson plan to teach technology and feminist theories. I should also state out front that what is missing in this analysis is much of any consideration to the problematic male-female binary or an intersectional approach to discussing women and Pinterest while also taking into account race, class, sexual orientation, ability and the whole spectrum of issues necessary to do this topic justice.
pinterest  via:metafilter  sociology  feminism  essay  people  via:migurski 
march 2012 by robertogreco
The importance of being axonometric - interview - Domus
What are the relations between digital cartography and hand-drawn maps?
The science is dividing the field of knowledge into disposable knowledge and reusable knowledge. Google maps are falling into the first category, while axonometric maps belong to the second, because they're suitable for being reused. An 11-year-old hand-drawn map still looks beautiful, whereas 11 years from now Google maps will be dated. Google and others are failing to present the beautifulness of our planet to us when doing their digital atlases.

Are you familiar with Baidu? The Chinese can't show satellite images of their cities so they model these detailed axonometric cityscapes.
Baidu shows very beautiful representations, similar to hand-drawn maps. They're like the depiction of a promise, telling you that it's a beautiful country to live in, whether it's true or not.

Reparieren leicht gemacht (1972), Verlag Das Beste, Stuttgart, 23 x 26 cm, 568 pp
Do you think the actual possibility of processing big datasets will affect other fields of visual design beyond data representation?
The digital has had a great impact not only on the production of information, but also on how to get to the sources. But this speed comes at a cost that shouldn't be underestimated, and that cost is precision. In the early days, information designers controlled the entire process and physically possessed the information. Nowadays, if you're doing a data visualisation using bytes that aren't on your hard drive, or that you don't even own, then you're dependent on other people. That's the digital drawback. The moment authoritarian countries decide to cut the wires, all the knowledge will be gone.
visualization  cartography  mapping  interview  infographics  via:migurski 
february 2012 by robertogreco
"the more you focus on control, the more likely you’re working on a project that’s striving to deliver something of relatively minor value" [.pdf]
"The book’s most quoted line is its first sentence: “You can’t control what you can’t measure.” This line contains a real truth, but I’ve become increasingly uncomfortable with my use of it. Implicit in the quote (and indeed in the book’s title) is that control is an important aspect, maybe the most important, of any software project. But it isn’t. Many projects have proceeded without much control but managed to produce wonderful products such as GoogleEarth or Wikipedia…

This leads us to the odd conclusion that strict control is something that matters a lot on relatively useless projects and much less on useful projects. It suggests that the more you focus on control, the more likely you’re working on a project that’s striving to deliver something of relatively minor value."
management  administration  control  value  whatmatters  work  leadership  measurement  software  metrics  development  programming  tcsnmy  via:migurski  filetype:pdf  media:document  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
HOWTO: Native iPhone/iPad apps in JavaScript
"Until the recent language ban imposed by Apple, I didn't even know that you could write native apps for iPhone and iPad in JavaScript. (I must be the last person to figure this out; it's been possible since 2008!)

In case you're as late to the party as me, it turns out that you can get web apps to behave like native apps. In this article, I'll explain how to:

strip away the browser chrome (the url bar and button bar);
prevent viewport scrolling and scaling;
respond to multi-touch and gesture events;
use webkit CSS to get the iPhone OS look and feel;
cache the app so it runs without internet access;
get a custom icon on the home screen; and
have a splash screen load at the start.

If you want to put it in the app store, you can even package your web app as a "native" Objective-C app. (Although, why you'd want to subject yourself to the app store approval process when you don't have to is beyond me.)"
iphone  ipad  javascript  development  howto  css  html  via:migurski  ios  applications  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Uncleftish Beholding - Wikipedia
"Uncleftish Beholding (1989) is a short text written by Poul Anderson. It is written using almost exclusively words of Germanic origin, and was intended to illustrate what the English language might look like if it had not received its considerable number of loanwords from other languages, particularly Latin, Greek and French.

The text is about basic atomic theory and relies on a number of word coinings, many of which have analogues in modern German. The title "uncleftish beholding" calques "atomic theory". The text begins:

"For most of its being, mankind did not know what things are made of, but could only guess. With the growth of worldken, we began to learn, and today we have a beholding of stuff and work that watching bears out, both in the workstead and in daily life.""
language  history  english  linguistics  via:migurski  uncleftishbeholding  1989  poulanderson  theory  german  germanic  constraints  classideas  writing  literature  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
BBC - Newsnight: Paul Mason: Twenty reasons why it's kicking off everywhere
"18. People have a better understanding of power. The activists have read their Chomsky and their Hardt-Negri, but the ideas therein have become mimetic: young people believe the issues are no longer class and economics but simply power: they are clever to the point of expertise in knowing how to mess up hierarchies and see the various 'revolutions' in their own lives as part of an 'exodus' from oppression, not - as previous generations did - as a 'diversion into the personal'. While Foucault could tell Gilles Deleuze: 'We had to wait until the nineteenth century before we began to understand the nature of exploitation, and to this day, we have yet to fully comprehend the nature of power',- that's probably changed."
via:migurski  politics  socialmedia  egypt  culture  history  hierarchy  power  society  memes  religion  economics  protest  activism  technology  blogs  twitter  facebook  discourse  disruption  michaelhardt  antonionegri  foucault  deleuze  noamchomsky  gillesdeleuze  michelfoucault  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Does a strict upbringing make you a better designer?: Observatory: Design Observer
Coment from pboy: "Oh, barf! Even the Tiger Mom has expressed some ambiguity about the outcomes of her parenting philosophy, but to use the current craze over her as the excuse for yet another reification of the moldy-oldie of graphic design 'Modernism' is just pathetic. Beirut was lucky to have experienced the Kalman corrective to Vignelli's moribund fake discipline. ... romanticize the intolerant and didactic daddies all you want, it's the generation that finally walked away from what had devolved into a rigid and phony stance that let the 'discipline' grow. And that includes Beirut, even if he's too traumatized by his own experience with tough love to be able to recognize it, or to be able admit more clearly, and without the unnecessary flattery to Vignelli, that he learned to think for himself, and move on."
design  typography  modernism  michaelbierut  via:migurski  parenting  amychua  rigidity  graphicdesign  massimovignelli  authoritarianism  creativity  criticalthinking  toughlove  teaching  education  learning  identity  unschooling  deschooling  discipline  tiborkalman  rules  constraints  from delicious
february 2011 by robertogreco
Only 66% Use Twitter Profile Location Field as Intended, Says PARC Research Study
"From the 34% who did not provide real location information, there were a number of trends spotted. One was that the field was often used to denote appreciation for a particular celebrity. Celebrities the researchers came across here included Britney Spears, the Jonas Brothers, Jedward and, of course, topping the charts with 61 users mentioning him, Justin Bieber.

Another common trend was using the location field to express a desire for keeping that information private through the use of phrasing like "not telling you," "none of your business," etc. Also frequenting this field were insults ("looking down on u people"), non-Earth locations ("outta space"), sexual content, jokes and even an expression about how much someone hated their current location. (for example, one user said he was from "redneck hell")."
twitter  privacy  geolocation  location  statistics  identity  via:migurski  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Project Names and Borges Numbers
"Reporters do this sort of thing every day. It's neat, but not amazing. But when the consultant had finished his meeting, he said to himself, "Well, Walnut's a tree, it's something to eat ... and it's an exchange in the San Jose telephone directory." And he asked the first friend he encountered on his way out, "Say, what's the current status on BUtterfield?" And by the time he left the plant he knew all about Project Butterfield too, and how far over budget it was, and why it would never work either.

Now, I'm not saying this story is true.. but it's one of my favorites.

(I have often thought that it would be useful to create a list of names, chosen such that knowing one name on the list provided the least possible information about the rest of the list. We would, of course, call such an enumeration "Borges numbers," after the numbering scheme described in J. L. Borges' story "Funes the Memorious.")"
borges  naming  history  information  ibm  1995  via:migurski  funesthememorius  projectnames  secrecy  security  tomvanvleck  names  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
I Wish This Was
"New Orleans is full of vacant storefronts and people who need things. These stickers are an easy tool to voice what you want where you want it. Fill them out and put them on abandoned buildings and beyond.

These stickers are custom vinyl and can be easily removed without damaging property. They're free and can be found in corner stores, cafes, bookstores, bars, hair salons, and other places around New Orleans. See select photos here and share more on Flickr (tag your photos "iwishthiswas") or email photos or locations.

This project was created by local designer Candy Chang and launched with exhibit Ethnographic Terminalia at DuMois Gallery. Come to the opening Nov 19 or visit the show until Dec 3 2010 for good times and free stickers."
candychang  crowdsourcing  stickers  urbanism  neworleans  location  labels  papernet  city  nola  activism  iwishthiswas  via:migurski  cities  classideas  civics  potential  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
welcome to optimism: A short rant about games, play and storytelling
"We're here to create strong, provocative relationships between great companies and their customers. Games and new ways of storytelling are a fantastic and incredibly exciting way of doing that."
via:migurski  games  gaming  facebook  storytelling  advertising  play  videogames  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Information is a Material (Device Design Day talk transcript) - Orange Cone
"When something becomes cheap, it quickly joins the toolkit of things we create our world with. It becomes a design material. Sometimes for better and other times for worse.<br />
<br />
In the last five years cheap, small processors have drastically lowered the cost of taking information in, evaluating it, manipulating it, rearranging it, and acting on it. It is no longer unthinkable to have an everyday object use an embedded processor to take a small piece of information--say the temperature, or the orientation of a device, or your meeting schedule--and autonomously act on it to help the device do its job better. Information processing is now part of the set of options we can practically consider when designing just about any object.<br />
<br />
In other words, information is quickly becoming a material to design with."
mikekuniavsky  via:migurski  data  information  design  microprocessors  embedded  informationprocessing  processing  informationasmaterial  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
41Latitude - Bing Maps's Redesign: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
"As you can see from my examples, this was not some incremental improvement that Microsoft gave to Bing Maps—no, this was a vast overhaul. In truth, it seems as though Microsoft has left nothing unchanged in the “new” Bing Maps. And yet even though the “new” maps are unusually light on detail (especially in how few cities they seem to show), they’re now among the most aesthetically pleasing maps on the web.

On an unrelated note, I find the similarities between Windows Phone 7’s UI and the “new” Bing Maps to be quite curious: both use Segoe fonts, both are unflinchingly minimalistic, and both are dramatic breaks from their predecessors. Maybe this really is a new direction for Microsoft."
via:migurski  maps  mapping  microsoft  cartography  design  aesthetics  bing  labels  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
scraplab — You’ve Either Shipped or You Haven’t
"You’ve either shipped, or you haven’t. You’ve either poured weeks, months or even years of your life into bringing a product or a service into the world, or you haven’t.

If you have, you’ll know what I’m talking about. You’ll have flicked a switched, cap deploy‘d, or flipped your closed sign to open, and just waited – holding your breath for whatever happens next.

And at that moment everything that’s wrong with it suddenly comes into sharp focus...

So you wear your learning smile, step back a bit, have a think, and work out what to do next.

But whatever you do next, you’ve shipped. You’ve joined the club.

And the next time someone produces an antenna with a weak spot, or a sticky accelerator, you’re more likely to feel their pain, listen to their words and trust their actions than the braying media who have never shipped anything in their lives."
2010  learning  antennas  business  building  creativity  creation  entrepreneurship  apple  shipping  making  life  iphone  failure  experience  critics  culture  delivery  tcsnmy  lcproject  doing  do  make  via:migurski  empathy  startups  cv  controversy  complaints 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Robins can literally see magnetic fields, but only if their vision is sharp | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine
"Some birds can sense the Earth’s magnetic field and orientate themselves with the ease of a compass needle. This ability is a massive boon for migrating birds, keeping frequent flyers on the straight and narrow. But this incredible sense is closely tied to a more mundane one – vision. Thanks to special molecules in their retinas, birds like the European robins can literally see magnetic fields. The fields appear as patterns of light and shade, or even colour, superimposed onto what they normally see.
magnets  animals  birds  robins  via:migurski  migration  nature  perception  physics  vision  biology  compass  magnetic  senses  sight  science  light  evolution 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Clay Shirky: 'Paywall will underperform – the numbers don't add up' | Technology | The Guardian
"The one point of agreement between internet utopians and sceptics has been their techno-deterministic assumption that the web has fundamentally changed human behaviour. Both sides, Shirky says, are wrong. "Techies were making the syllogism, if you put new technology into an existing situation, and new behaviour happens, then that technology caused the behaviour. But I'm saying if the new technology creates a new behaviour, it's because it was allowing motivations that were previously locked out. These tools we now have allow for new behaviours – but they don't cause them." Had Facebook been around when he was in his 20s, he cheerfully admits, he too would have spent his youth emailing photos of himself to everyone he knew."
clayshirky  via:migurski  cognitivesurplus  technodeterminism  collaboration  socialnetworking  behavior  business  future  2010  newspapers  internet  journalism  paywall  media  culture  creativity  community  socialmedia  news  technology  optimism  web 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Patrick O'Brian Mapping Project
"To accurately map the progress of Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin over the course of the 21 novels by Patrick O'Brian."
classideas  via:migurski  maps  mapping  literature  infographics  history  googlemaps  gis  fiction  books  patrickobrian  jackaubrey  stephenmaturin  novels 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Learning from Libraries: The Literacy Challenge of Open Data | eaves.ca
"We didn’t build libraries for a literate citizenry. We built libraries to help citizens become literate. Today we build open data portals not because we have public policy literate citizens, we build them so that citizens may become literate in public policy."
libraries  democracy  education  government  history  information  liberty  opendata  open  literacy  data  change  via:migurski 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Make Your Own Moleskine-Like-Notebook
"Your very own Moleskine-like-notebook/journal/sketchbook. The one we'll be making is 3.5 x 5.5 x .5 inches. I use this size because it fits nicely into my back or front pants pocket. Strangely enough it is also the same size as the Moleskine notebook. For the pages we'll be using 20# bond paper (the same paper you use in your copier and inkjet printer). As you might have noticed in the dimensions, the notebook is a half-inch thick. This gives you 192 single pages of writing/sketching/painting fun. For the cover we'll use vinyl Naugahyde (that's what I use but feel free to use whatever you have on hand). After we're through I'll offer a list of enhancements and alternative ways to make your notebook/journal/sketchbook to meet your individual needs.

Don't be put off by the many steps involved. This really is a simple project using common materials and tools. Almost anyone can do it."
via:migurski  art  book  bookbinding  moleskine  notebooks  howto  gtd  lifehacks  tutorial  tutorials  make  books  crafts  design  diy  papercraft  papernet  paper  projects  srg  glvo  tcsnmy 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Thinking About Innovation // NoahBrier.com
"To be honest, I don't feel like we've gotten anywhere on this one. Christensen made the same point as Hayes/Abernathy 22 years later and here we are, eight years after that, complaining about the same thing (or praising Steve Jobs for not subscribing). Interestingly, Managing Our Way to Economic Decline places much of the blame on the shift in corporate mindset from a one that makes someone with a technical background president, to one that makes someone with a financial/legal background president (see chart below).
business  history  management  politics  process  finance  innovation  leadership  understanding  tcsnmy  corporatism  corporatemindset  via:migurski  noahbrier 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Take It to the Limit - Opinionator Blog - NYTimes.com
"What’s so charming about this calculation is the way infinity comes to the rescue. At every finite stage, the scalloped shape looks weird and unpromising. But when you take it to the limit — when you finally “get to the wall” — it becomes simple and beautiful, and everything becomes clear. That’s how calculus works at its best."
math  infinity  archimedes  pi  circles  circumference  area  calculus  mathematics  via:migurski  proof  visualization  geometry  limits  education  history 
april 2010 by robertogreco
ONull - Vector Generator
"ONull is an image based Vector Generator for Mac OSX. It allows the user to convert images into rasterized vector graphics. This tool was developed to give graphic designers the ability to transform small images from the Internet into printable and editable graphics. ONull is written in Java and uses the Processing core library as graphical engine."
onull  raster  vectors  visualization  macosx  osx  mac  converter  design  freeware  generator  processing  java  via:migurski  images  illustrator  graphics  software  pdf  photography 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Indirect Collaboration: Collective Creativity on the Web: Q&A With Shawn Allen of Stamen Design
"The tighter our connection with the client, the faster things happen. We appreciate that some clients are going to defer to us on every design-related decision, but the smart ones who can call us out and involve themselves in the process are typically more fun to work with. We thrive on fast-paced projects, rapid iteration, and constructive feedback."
via:migurski  iteration  design  collaboration  interviews  process  clients  stamen  feedback  constructivecriticism  projects  tcsnmy  howwework 
february 2010 by robertogreco
KrazyDad » Mayor of the North Pole
"I’ve been blatantly cheating at foursquare for the past week. I didn’t mean to start the week this way. Most of my friends know me as a responsible father who occasionally plays piano at local open mics, and makes puzzles.

Last Sunday, while checking into the Hill Street Cafe in Burbank using the foursquare iPhone app, I idly wondered, “Can I become the mayor of the North Pole?” So I tried checking into a nearby 7-Eleven. It worked. I tried the Griffith Observatory about 5 miles away. It worked. I tried Disneyland, which is about an hour away. It didn’t work, but I now had an afternoon hacking project.

When I got home, I looked to see if foursquare had an api. They did. So I found a venue that was close to the North Pole, the “Top of the World” hotel in Barrow Alaska, and checked myself into it."
foursquare  geolocation  social  via:migurski  hacks  hacking  api  play  scripts  fake  twitter 
february 2010 by robertogreco
All Hands Meetings « High Tech Coaching [I'm wondering what this implies for classroom situations like ours.]
"Getting everyone in one room together is a tradition that starts when a company is small, and often it continues in the same format well past the point that it's an efficient use of everyone's time. For a tiny startup, you can go around the room and have everyone talk about what they're up to, and coordinate who's doing what. It has a kind of charming informality, and since there aren't too many people there, it's not going to take too long. As a company gets bigger, that format starts to break down, usually at around 10-15 people."
management  meetings  organization  growth  projectmanagement  administration  tcsnmy  leadership  lcproject  classsize  groups  via:migurski 
january 2010 by robertogreco
sevensixfive: Losing My Edge: Architectural Informatics (and others)
"(Disclaimer: This is quick and unconsidered)

It is fascinating to watch other disciplines inch closer and closer to the territory that was once claimed by architects. As the profession of architecture continues to shrink, the ground that is ceded does not remain unclaimed for long, and there is new and interesting territory to be discovered at our borders that we no longer seem to have the resources to explore.

Sustainability Consulting, Strategic Masterplanning, Landscape Architecture - all of these other disciplines are very interested in architecture: its literature, its history, and its scope of services. Now add to that the relatively new fields of Service and Interaction Design. Recent articles here and here (and here(and here!)) have all implied that there is a strange relationship between services, distributed computing and cities, with a parallel strangeness in the design of interactions and the design of buildings.

Despite having several friends who are actively working in these fields, I admit that it is sometimes very difficult to understand what it is that they actually do (besides organize, attend, and speak at conferences). Many of them have backgrounds in architecture, and almost all of them are avidly reading Jane Jacobs, Christopher Alexander, Archigram, Situationists - all of this neglected literature from the 60s and 70s that architects themselves had almost forgotten, in our (perhaps bubble-powered) accelerated criticality (and the inevitable post).

So there are all of these people moving in this direction, and there are a few general observations that are worth making about that:

- They seem to think that they have something to learn from the theory and practice of architecture, so let's help them figure out what that is.

- They are creating their own discourse from scratch, outside of academia. Architectural discourse has been supported by schools for so long that it is difficult to remember any other way. The fields of Service and Interaction Design seem to be supported by something more like the feudal corporate patronage structure that architects relied on in the Renaissance. That's very interesting, no? Not the least because despite any purse or apron strings linking them to the corporate world, they still seem to want to talk about ideas, even some of the more out-there quasi-marxist corners of critical theory that academic architects like to frequent. That's kind of fun, right?

- They have no history. Though some might disagree, this is probably a good thing for now (but not for much longer).

- They bring an entrepreneurial startup culture with them. A lot of the work in this area is coming directly out of computer science by way of the old dot.com and web 2.0 pathways, but the thing is, these aren't the casualties, they are the survivors. Many of the people involved with these offices have lived through several busts, and they are thriving. They know about venture capital, public offerings, and bootstrapping. They have business plans. This is kind of exciting, yeah?

For Archinect's '09 predictions last year, I hoped that there would be this massive flow outward from architecture to other disciplines: underemployed architects as secret agents, implanting methodologies into other fields from the inside out. It hasn't happened. Instead, we've lost even more ground to others who are doing the things we do, and it's like the song says: "... to better-looking people with better ideas and more talent ... and they're actually really, really nice." They want to be friends, they want to talk about cities and buildings.

So in the New Year, let's all spend more time hanging out: architects can trade some of our thoughts on cultural context, historicity, and the public realm for some of you all's ideas about agility, narrative, strategery, and business planning, and we'll all hopefully learn a lot."
design  architecture  history  discipline  discourse  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  janejacobs  christopheralexander  archigram  fredscharmen  interaction  interactiondesign  reanissance  academia  patronage  servicedesign  situationist  theory  criticaltheory  via:migurski  baltimore  cities  culture  designthinking  interdisciplinary  urbanism 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Dolores Labs Blog » Not-quite-live-blog: Jonathan Zittrain on “Minds For Sale”
"Zittrain focuses on the potential alienation and opportunities for abuse that can arise with the growth of distributed online production. He also contemplates the thin line that separates exploitation from volunteering in the context of online communities and collaboration."
jonathanzittrain  crowdsourcing  ethics  participatory  participatoryculture  exploitation  online  abuse  via:migurski 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The high cost of ugly, useless Christmas gifts - The Globe and Mail
"Scroogenomics author says bad gifts cost the world economy $25-billion ... “A spectre has been haunting the rich economies of the west, and that spectre is wasteful gift-giving.”...His favourite option is giving to charity – he is a fan of a gift card in the United States that allows the recipient to choose which non-profit gets the money, “to act like a rich person,” he says. He proposes that gift cards should come with an expiry date, after which the unused balance would go to charity rather than just back into the retailer's pocket. But he concedes: “I am told by some shrewd people that's as likely as world peace.”
via:migurski  giftgiving  economics  waste  christmas  value  gifts  cv 
november 2009 by robertogreco
We Have A President - The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
"What we are seeing… is what we see everywhere with Obama: a relentless empiricism in pursuit of a particular objective & a willingness to let the process take its time. The very process itself can reveal - not just to Obama, but to everyone - what exactly the precise options are. Instead of engaging in adolescent tests of whether a president is "tough" or "weak", we actually have an adult prepared to allow the various choices in front of us be fully explored. He is, moreover, not taking the decision process outside the public arena. He is allowing it to unfold w/in the public arena…What strikes me about this is the enormous self-confidence this reveals. Here is a young president, prepared to allow himself to be portrayed as "weak" or "dithering" in the slow & meticulous arrival at public policy. He is trusting the reality to help expose what we need to do. He is allowing the debate - however messy & confusing & emotional - to take its time & reveal the real choices in front of us."
barackobama  afghanistan  confidence  leadership  politics  debate  via:migurski  andrewsullivan  foreignpolicy  military  terrorism  analysis  policy  process  empiricism  2009  middleeast  us  presidency 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Map Kibera
"Kibera's first complete free and open map: November 2009: Kibera, widely known as Africa's largest slum, remains a blank spot on the map. Without basic knowledge of the geography of Kibera it is impossible to have an informed discussion on how to improve the lives of residents of Kibera. Young Kiberans will create the first public digital map of Kibera."
via:migurski  mapping  africa  kibera  kenya  openstreetmap  maps  cities  informal  osm 
november 2009 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Technology | US city to start giant 'mapathon'
"Atlanta, the capital of the US state of Georgia will soon be the world's most digitally mapped city, according to organisers of a massive "mapathon".
openstreetmap  crowdsourcing  maps  mapping  osm  atlanta  georgia  via:migurski 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: architectural arteries
"After seeing James’ quick attempts at making maps with Cloudmade, I had a play, and made some maps of the UK, pulling out everything apart from the roads and rail. Sure, it’s a well-worn metaphor, but there’s something in the infrastructure making the landscape."
maps  mapping  cloudmade  cartography  openstreetmap  chrisheathcote  via:migurski  infrastructure  landscape  visualisation  geography  osm 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Try Coding Dear Boy - Laughing Meme
"Laziness Impatience Hubris: This is the dark side of the geek virtue of laziness.

The belief that if one just thinks hard enough, or cleverly enough, that problems will have an “elegant solution”. And by “elegant” we mean a solution that doesn’t involve much code. (elegant, such a tricky word, it can also mean writing tons of code for problems that will likely never manifest) And by “think hard and clever”, a good short cut is probably just be to ask someone. So I’ve come up with a response that looks something like: We generally try do the dumbest thing that will work first. And that’s usually as far as we get. Almost everything we do is pretty straightforward, and as such is well documented around the Web, sometimes by us, generally by others. And when we do get fiendishly clever, as we do now and again, it’s usually a highly tuned (read idiosyncratic) solution for the problems we’re trying to solve.”
humor  programming  flickr  code  laziness  problemsolving  doing  iteration  gtd  practical  practice  howwework  howwelearn  via:migurski  asksomeone 
september 2009 by robertogreco
The Value Every Business Needs to Create Now - Umair Haque - HarvardBusiness.org [related video: http://vimeo.com/5733976]
"Profit through economic harm to others results in what I've termed 'thin value.' Thin value is an economic illusion: profit that is economically meaningless, because it leaves others worse off, or, at best, no one better off. When you have to spend an extra 30 seconds for no reason, mobile operators win - but you lose time, money, and productivity. Mobile networks' marginal profits are simply counterbalanced by your marginal losses. That marginal profit doesn't reflect, often, the creation of authentic, meaningful value. Thin value is what the zombieconomy creates."
via:migurski  umairhaque  economics  business  zombieconomy  capitalism  innovation  strategy  success  competition  ethics  creativity  creation  capital  value  valueadded  finance  banking  crisis  gamechanging 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Fixed-gear rider or granny-bike dawdler: who will win the race? | Matthew Sparkes | Environment | guardian.co.uk
"A few miles later and everyone crossed the finish line in varying states of disarray. Fixed-gear rider was first, but sweaty enough to star in a Lynx commercial; hybrid commuter next and only slightly less moist. Last place on the podium went to road-bike racer, who was in need of a shower and a trip to the office first aid box before starting his working day.
bikes  biking  slow  fixedgear  sustainability  culture  commuting  via:migurski 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Obama *always* stays “two steps behind them” « ACCUMULATING PERIPHERALS
"I just wanted to point out that this has always been Obama’s MO. He’s always a step or two behind where his supporters want him to be, getting pulled along by their enthusiasm, rather than out ahead of them where he might get cut off. It’s a community organizer’s MO. You never get out ahead of your constituency. Instead you shape the playing field so that your constituency’s desires flow towards where you think they should go, and allow them to carry you along behind them."
via:migurski  barackobama  andrewsullivan  leadership  organization  community  politics  administration  iran  policy 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Firedoglake » The Reaganites Self-Inflicted Recession
"However, as even Republican strategists note, this exposes the real division in the Republican coalition, not between social and economic conservatives, but between exurbanites, and suburbanites. It is very easy to persuade exurbanites that they aren't socialists, even as they work on military bases, land leased at concessionary rates for mining, subsidized agriculture, waste facilities, and prisons. It is far harder to convince suburbanites of the evils of government, when they live in a place that is made safe by government, and whose value comes from subsidized education and transportation. The internal contradiction of Reaganism, then, has produced a vast self-inflicted wound on the very people who mobilized for it."
via:migurski  politics  economics  democrats  republicans  conservatism  california  cities  exurbs  suburbs  us  taxes  reagan  unemployment  recession 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Sisyphus Office Exhibition, Houston 2009. on the Behance Network
"The artists involved in the project are collaborating with businesses and offices in and around Houston in order to highlight art as an integral and necessary distraction in our day to day life. The artists and offices involved in Sisyphus Office are working physically and conceptually with the notions of existentialism, capitalism, artistic romanticism and deadpan slapstickism as a means to examine the artifice that keeps us clinging to reality and distracted from the void. Sisyphus Office is about punching the clock, and then punching it again…but harder the second time. It’s about transcending the mundane through the beauty and absurdity of distraction. It’s about recognizing the comedy in the tragedy of the day to day… and then waking up again to do the same thing all over again the next morning."
art  work  humor  houston  drawing  typography  installation  office  design  via:migurski  2009  handdrawn  illustration  culture  collage 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Old Map App
"Old Map App allows an iPhone user to explore the effects of time on geography and urban development.

The application displays layers of geo-referenced historical maps projected onto a modern coordinate system, so that the same location can be compared over time. Layers can be faded, adjusted, and explored freely. If the user is located with the region of the historical map, the user's position will be mapped on the old maps to the position of the compass indicator.

Several maps of New York City & Region are included from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. All are high-resolution scans from the Library of Congress."
iphone  applications  maps  mapping  history  nyc  via:migurski  csiap  ios  location-based 
may 2009 by robertogreco
The importance of stupidity in scientific research -- Schwartz 121 (11): 1771 -- Journal of Cell Science
"Productive stupidity means being ignorant by choice. Focusing on important questions puts us in the awkward position of being ignorant. One of the beautiful things about science is that it allows us to bumble along, getting it wrong time after time, and feel perfectly fine as long as we learn something each time. No doubt, this can be difficult for students who are accustomed to getting the answers right. No doubt, reasonable levels of confidence and emotional resilience help, but I think scientific education might do more to ease what is a very big transition: from learning what other people once discovered to making your own discoveries. The more comfortable we become with being stupid, the deeper we will wade into the unknown and the more likely we are to make big discoveries."
science  methodology  agnotology  education  learning  academia  thinking  research  skills  creativity  philosophy  motivation  gradschool  phd  via:migurski 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Whitelines® - the new writing paper
"Writing paper with dark supporting lines has been around since medieval times when iron gall ink was used for its lasting dark colour. It took until our recent time before the idea of making a writing paper with white, “non-conflict”, lines got known from an idea of the designer Olof Hansson. Writing paper with white lines is now a patented solution."
via:migurski  paper  notebooks  srg  gifts  writing  whitelines  design 
february 2009 by robertogreco
The City From Below | The City From Below - March 27th-29th, 2009 Baltimore
"The city has emerged in recent years as an indispensable concept for many of the struggles for social justice we are all engaged in [...] In cities everywhere, new social movements are coming into being, hidden histories and herstories are being uncovered, and unanticipated futures are being imagined and built - but so much of this knowledge remains, so to speak, at street-level. We need a space to gather and share our stories, our ideas and analysis, a space to come together and rethink the city from below."
psychogeography  cities  urban  politics  urbanism  grassroots  design  education  culture  architecture  art  activism  development  planning  landscape  baltimore  precarity  conferences  space  via:migurski 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Andy Budd::Blogography: Why I Can't Afford Cheap
"Too poor to buy cheap. That simple phase really resonated with me and has stuck with me ever since.

Cheap is quick. Cheap is dirty. Cheap is disposable.

Cheap breaks.

Cheap costs money. It costs money to fix, it costs money to replace.

Cheap seems like a good idea at the time but cheap fails when you most need it.

Cheap is flimsy and unsatisfying.

Cheap is inefficient.

Cheap gets in your way.

Cheap costs you time and it costs you customers.

Cheap always cost you more in the end. That’s why I can’t afford to buy cheap. Can you?"
via:migurski  quality  affordability  money  wisdom  sustainability  time  services  longevity  beausage  business  life  value  shopping  design  price  slow  simplicity  wabi-sabi 
february 2009 by robertogreco
sevensixfive: X Ways to Ride a Bike in the City
"Coast, As a Swimmer among Monsters, Synaesthetically, Risk vs. Reward, Mindfully."
bikes  cities  urban  navigation  adaptation  cv  via:migurski  fredscharmen 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Code: Flickr Developer Blog » Living In the Donut Hole
"Cities long ago stopped being defined by the walls that surround(ed) them. There is probably no better place in the world to see this than Barcelona which first burst out of its Old City with the construction of the Example at the end of the 19th century and then again, after the wars, pushed further out towards the hills and rivers that surround it. ... But maybe we should also map the neighbourhoods that aren’t considered the immediate children of a city but which overlap its boundaries. What if you could call an API method to return the list or the shape of a place’s “cousins”? What could that tell us about a place?"
maps  mapping  flickr  neighborhoods  geodata  place  cities  boundaries  via:migurski  shapes  geolocation  emergence  politicalvsperceptual  agitpropproject  the2837university  shapefiles  aaronstraupcope 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: Stumbling Away from the Story - "In general, we’re finding that the way people use the web is less narrative and more random than we ever expected. It’s probabilistic."
"Sometimes I think events today more closely resemble a giant wall of sticky notes. Draw lines, make clusters, add more facts as you find them; do your best to hold it all in your head. But it doesn’t all add up. There are contradictions. But hey, that’s the world — and maybe we need better tools to understand it that way. We argue: Stories are those tools. It’s stories that allows us to understand these things at all...Our brains are wired for narrative. But I don’t buy it. Our brains are constantly changing, and I think the internet is a bellwether: We are not using the web in a narrative way. We’re using it in some weird, new way that we don’t have good words for yet. It’s all juxtaposition and feeds and filters, searching and stumbling and sharing. And importantly, it’s starting to make sense. It’s not gut-churning chaos out here, unmoored from the safe haven of story. It’s actually getting kinda comfortable." [Now at: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/2479 sans my comment]
via:migurski  comments  society  culture  internet  thinking  psychology  brain  narrative  storytelling  evolution  web  chaostoorder  reasoning  writing  google  news  history  future  change  journalism  snarkmarket 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Travel time to major cities: A global map of Accessibility - European Commission
"The world is shrinking. Cheap flights, large scale commercial shipping and expanding road networks all Wilderness? Only 10% of the land area is remote – more than 48 hours from a large city mean that we are better connected to everywhere else than ever before. But global travel and international trade and just two of the forces that have reshaped our world. A new map of Travel Time to Major Cities - developed by the European Commission and the World Bank - captures this connectivity and the concentration of economic activity and also highlights that there is little wilderness left. The map shows how accessible some parts of the world have become whilst other regions have remained isolated. Accessibility - whether it is to markets, schools, hospitals or water - is a precondition for the satisfaction of almost any economic need."
accessibility  economics  mapping  maps  visualization  statistics  geography  geodata  heatmap  travel  cities  networks  distance  via:migurski 
january 2009 by robertogreco
atlas(t): obama's office of urban policy
"Yes, we need to fight poverty," he said. "Yes, we need to fight crime. Yes, we need to strengthen our cities. But we also need to stop seeing our cities as the problem and start seeing them as the solution. Because strong cities are the building blocks of strong regions, and strong regions are essential for a strong America."
via:migurski  politics  urban  barackobama  planning  cities  urbanplanning  us  policy 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Helmintholog » Blog Archive » On the loss of history
"Thinking about the ignorant, angry atheists who infest the Guardian’s comment pages I realised one thing they have in common with scriptural fundamentalists: they have no idea of history. They live in an eternally dazzling present and they can’t imagine that there is anything outside it. Oh, sure, they have legends — the inquisition, the crusades, the middle ages — but within these legends the actors move, as they do in renaissance paintings, entirely in contemporary dress. There is no sense of the strangeness and difficulty of the past; no sense that many things have been tried and failed; no sense that words once meant things entirely different and possibly inexpressible now."
history  religion  belief  atheism  ignorance  fundamentalism  via:migurski 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Baumol's cost disease (aka Baumol Effect) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"involves a rise of salaries in jobs that have experienced no increase of labor productivity in response to rising salaries in other jobs which did ...goes against theory in classical economics that wages are always closely tied to labor productivity changes...rise of wages in jobs w/out productivity gains is caused by necessity to compete for employees w/ jobs that did...& hence can naturally pay higher salaries...In range of businesses...car manufacturing & retail, workers are continually more productive due to tech innovations to tools & equipment. In contrast, in some labor-intensive sectors that rely heavily on human interaction or activities...nursing, education, performing arts there is little/no growth in productivity over time...total factor productivity treatment is not available to performing arts sector, because consumable good is labor itself...increases in price of performing arts has been offset by increases in standard of living & entertainment spending by consumers."
productivity  performingarts  work  economics  wages  pay  labor  entertainment  services  manufacturing  via:migurski 
november 2008 by robertogreco
The Field: Evolutionary Leaps and American Public Opinion [by Al Giordano] [pair with http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QIGJTHdH50]
"Their obsession ... masks a fear of the inverse: What if, suddenly, the story of this election becomes that moment in history when millions of American citizens evolved beyond fixed patterns and fears regarding race? ... What happens if the economic stresses suddenly push people, however reluctantly, into voting in their economic self-interest even if it means voting against their own racial prejudices?...Evolutionary leaps, if they exist, are not everyday occurrences. What I'm saying is that the patient - that racially fearful white American - is stressed and heavily so. And that's one of the objective conditions - according to at least one laboratory study - that leads to leaps in evolution and, maybe, just maybe, to mutations in the evolution of public opinion. In the lab it took some stressed conditions plus a catalyst - some amino acids - to cause a species to evolve. In human history, it takes stressed conditions... plus a movement."
barackobama  2008  elections  gamechanging  historicmoments  evolutionaryleaps  politics  economics  race  racism  us  society  johnmccain  via:migurski 
october 2008 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » Cultural appropriation of the kick-ass kind
"Performing haka in north Texas isn’t an act of random cultural appropriation. The offensive and defensive lines of the Trojans are filled with Tongan players, representing 4,000 people of Tongan descent who live in town of 52,900. The size, speed and skill of these players has a lot to do with the emergence of Trinity as a football powerhouse - in a recent NPR piece on the team, one coach of the team remarked that his offensive line currently outweighed that of Washington Redskins...What’s fascinating to me is the way in which the Haka made it into Euless...wasn’t through elders communicating a dance tradition to children. Instead, some of the players watched the New Zealand rugby team perform the haka on YouTube and began learning the moves in a local park. With the permission and blessing of the local Tongan community, they began performing the dance at community events. It later worked its way onto the football field, where it’s become a critical part of Trinity football culture."
society  culture  sports  football  dance  haka  ethanzuckerman  via:migurski  yotube  culturalappropriation 
october 2008 by robertogreco
What if our political process became conscious? (Scripting News)
"My advice to candidates going back to Dean was & is to start implementing the change you seek before the election, while you have the full attention of the electorate. Ask us to give money, not to buy ads, but to buy health insurance for 50,000 uninsured people in a particular state, so we can see how powerful we are collectively, how we can do good, starting right now. We yearn for this, to feel our muscles flex collectively, and individually to make a difference, not just in your hype, but in real terms. Hillary Clinton could have gotten up yesterday and said "There's no time to waste. We can't wait until January 2009 to solve the problems. Let's start right now."...Maybe she won't get elected, but getting us organized now would make it more likely...JFK: "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country."...See how that works??"
davewiner  democracy  politics  via:migurski  gamechanging  policy  example  leadership  us  elections  2008  process  government  progress  progressives  activism  change  reform  healthcare  education  sincerity  money 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Copenhagen Cycle Chic - Streetstyle and Bike Advocacy in High Heels: Terminology Folly
"She isn't an activist, doesn't belong to a cycling organisation with a long acronym and she doesn't even think about the fact that she lives in something called a "bike culture". She's just a cyclist. Riding her bike to work. She'll be doing the same tomorrow. If other cities had more of these kinds of cyclists, they'd find that a "bike culture" would be achieved a lot more quickly."
bikes  denmark  copenhagen  urban  culture  via:migurski 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Bikeway or the Highway - March/April 2008 - Sierra Magazine - Sierra Club
"IN 1900, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIANS CREATED a futuristic traffic structure catering to the mechanical marvel of the day--the bicycle. It opened along a corridor known as the Arroyo Seco, named for the seasonal stream that flows from the San Gabriel Mountains and enters the Los Angeles River just north of downtown Los Angeles. It was part of a grand plan to connect Los Angeles to Pasadena through an eight-mile "great transit artery." A Pasadena mayor, Horace Dobbins, provided the start-up funds to create an elevated, multilane, wooden "cycleway," complete with streetlights and gazebo turnouts."
transportation  history  bikes  losangeles  california  via:migurski  pasadena 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Moving Targets - NYTimes.com
"Isolated, freakish events, certainly. Indeed, some cycling advocates say that as riders in their communities have become a customary sight, civility by motorists has improved. But overwhelmingly, on blogs and Web sites nationwide, drivers and cyclists routinely describe shouted epithets, flung water bottles, sprays of spit and harrowing near-misses of the intentional kind.
via:migurski  bikes  cities  sharing  society  cars  transportation 
august 2008 by robertogreco
This Blog Sits at the: Who is the Elizabethan widow now? "Is there a group of people who by their structural location and/or generational identity who is prepared to play the wild card, free agent?...most likely...boomers in retirement
"Strauss & Howe, the students of Gen Y, insist that "millennials" are quiescent. The impulses "counter" & "alternative" do not beat within their breasts...it looks as if they may be right. No one from Gen Y appears to have risen to protest the designatio
culture  generations  via:migurski  history  geny  millennials  genx  generationx  babyboomers  widows  elizabethanwidows  grantmccracken  boomers 
july 2008 by robertogreco
BikePortland.org » Blog Archive » Update from California: A speeding ticket, lunch with Gary Fisher, and bike dancing in between
"We’re on similar wavelengths about the bike revolution and it was neat to hear that he’s [Gary Fisher] also been thinking about something I’ve been saying for months now — that, cars are the new smoking."
transportation  bikes  via:migurski  society  culture  environment 
july 2008 by robertogreco
TheWashCycle: The Myth of the Scofflaw Cyclist
"Cyclists in general know the law better than drivers...And better than the police even. So much of the myth stems not from willful disregard for the law by cyclists, but rampant ignorance of the law by drivers." "Now then, I'm not trying to claim that cyclists don't break the law. Let me state clearly and upfront, they do. What I'm saying is that there is nothing unique about the frequency with which cyclists as a class break the law when compared with drivers or pedestrians. And even if cyclists broke the law more flagrantly than others, this would not negate the need to share the road."
bikes  cars  mobility  politics  roads  safety  streets  urbanism  law  culture  washingtondc  dc  via:migurski 
july 2008 by robertogreco
EzraKlein Archive | The American Prospect
"In US no one cycles, and [less so] over 30...in Netherlands, 1/4 of old make trips by bike....everyone cycles...mode of transport...often best for given trip....Meanwhile, problem in US is, compared to other countries, cycling is incredibly unsafe"
via:migurski  us  netherlands  transportation  bikes  travel  health  safety  culture 
july 2008 by robertogreco
R-Squared Energy Blog: Peak Convenience
"Most people are going to find that certain conveniences that we have taken for granted during the age of cheap oil are less attainable (i.e., more expensive) than they once were."
via:migurski  peakoil  peakconvenience  culture  change  future  society  travel  transportation  flight  masstransit  energy 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Rirkrit Tiravanija - Wikipedia
"early installations involved cooking meals for gallery-goers...explores social role of artist...described by Bourriaud as having "relational aesthetics."...installations often take form of stages or rooms for sharing meals, cooking, reading, playing music. Architecture or structures for living and socializing are a core element in his work."
art  artists  buenosaires  argentina  via:migurski  cooking  architecture 
july 2008 by robertogreco
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